Tag Archives: Amazon

HUGE Amazon Uses Brave Ads

[HUGE] Amazon Uses Brave Ads


 

Hello again fellow BAT lovers, I come bearing some more good news for you. We are all in a strange spot in the market, so any little good news is much appreciated. 

If you’ve read even a few articles that I’ve written about Brave and BAT, then you’ll know that I’m a huge fan. I’ve recommended the Brave browser to everyone here and in my personal circles, and I’m proud to say that they’re all really digging the browser. 

Fortunately, for you guys, this good news is a pretty big deal. This comes courtesy of my friend in Germany who sent me a screenshot of an AMAZON ad that was on Brave. 

Amazon Brave

I wasn’t quite convinced of it at first glance, thinking it was just some Amazon affiliate on Brave Ads – there are affiliate ads already running in the US. Anyway, me being the enthusiast that I am, asked him to check the ad out so that I could see what it was. The ad took him to this page:

351665157-3e3e588a1c61e8db40d3aa5cdcc5afdf1011248d9813430edddbc3a891d65c16.jpeg

After that, I was curious, what with Amazon already showing some interest in the Brave program (BAT is now redeemable on Amazon and many other platforms), so I asked him to send me the redirect URL, which is:

https://www.primevideo.com/?tag=braveuk0d-21

Notice the URL? It doesn’t have the affiliate string, which means that this is through and through an Amazon run ad. It’s amazing to see one of the biggest companies in the world (and AMAZON on top of that, for which you see an endless number of ads) use Brave Ads. I think it is a real validation of what Brave is trying to do as well as the effectiveness of the whole service.

My friend also just sent me another screenshot that all but confirms that Amazon is on Brave Ads.

351665157-5ca358b7cf908b65a2a3923a0167e102cb752c7e154899b9d38350e30ec5893e.png

The redirect URL shows you that this is a page with various merchants, so it’s not an affiliate. Here's a screenshot of the page:

351665157-81d164c5a7209b9303245633c604a325d0c2f14e33d3ef7b7f2c10be46e4f73e.png

Coming back to the tag in the URL string, “tag=braveuk0d-21”, shows that Amazon is testing Brave ads to see how it does. The UK bit makes me think that UK is one of the markets for these ads.

Amazon somewhat on board? I think so! 

Turning Point for Brave and BAT 

This is probably something Amazon is testing to see how much they can get out of this. But even that is a big milestone for Brave, which has risen incredibly both in terms of adoption and ecosystem expansion in such a short span of time.  

If we begin to see more Amazon ads on Brave Ads, then it probably means that the ads have met Key Performance Indicators and they’re happy with what they’re getting out of it. They're testing their services via Brave Ads and surely they must believe that there is potential, otherwise they would not even consider trying it (it's Amazon, after all). If from a few months now Amazons ads continue to show up, then it's a sign that their ads performance indicators like return on ad spends are showing good numbers.

This is going to be the big turning point for BAT, as a major entity is confirming its belief in the program and that will almost immediately rope in more entities. It's a huge seal of approval.

Now I think Amazon even trying this is a big thing, but as we see more advertisers joining, and the continuation of ads by the likes of Amazon, we will see BAT and Brave explode in terms of price and adoption respectively. Just having big well known names joining the ecosystem (and Brave itself has been receiving great reviews) bodes extremely well for BAT’s value. It’s kinda like how Tesla’s stock went up after it was announced that their production numbers had been delivered. When people see BAT clicking with advertisers and doing as it was expected to do, the token’s price will go up.

So let me know if any of you (whichever country you may be in) are seeing Amazon ads. 

Heiko Closhen, Entrepreneur

Want to Work From Home? Amazon Is Hiring 5,000 People to Work From Their Kitchens and Living Rooms

Jeff Bezos. CREDIT: Getty Images

These jobs are all about the flexibility and the benefits–including, of course, the ability to work from home.
  
  By Bill Murphy Jr. 
There's nothing like working from home–that is, if you can make it work for you. Prerequisites: an efficient space, a healthy respect for your own time–and, of course, a job.

If it all sounds appealing to you, and you haven't already found your work-from-home nirvana, perhaps Amazon might be the answer. The company recently announced it's planning to hire 5,000 home-based workers to join its customer service teams.

Many of the new jobs will come with benefits, including health insurance, sick and vacation time, and tuition.

Jobs "with benefits"
We'll get to the hourly pay in a minute, but the real value in these jobs is probably in the flexibility and those two little words: "with benefits." Because if you work more than 20 hours a week at Amazon, the company says, you get:

"… life and disability insurance, dental and vision insurance with premiums paid in full by Amazon, and funding toward medical insurance," along with the company's Career Choice program, which "prepays 95 percent of tuition for courses related to in-demand fields, regardless of whether the skills are relevant to a future career at Amazon."

"There are lots of people who want or need a flexible job–whether they're a military spouse, a college student, or a parent–and we're happy to empower these talented people no matter where they happen to live," Tom Weiland, Amazon vice president for worldwide customer service, said in a press release.

In addition to these positions, Amazon says it's hiring another 25,000 part-timers to work onsite this year, and another 100,000 full-timers over the next 18 months.

There's no word on what the home-based jobs pay in the press release, but a separate job listing says the "pay rate nationwide is $10.00 per hour."

And, at least for now, it looks like the part-time hours are limited to nighttime and weekend work, which could make it tough for parents who were hoping to work while their kids are at school, for example.

Also–again at least for now–Amazon is limiting hiring to people who live in 26 of the 50 states. (Sorry Californians and Texans.) You can find the details and the application process here.  http://www.amazondelivers.jobs/about/our-opportunities/#hourly-fulfillment-associates

Nobody is going to get rich working from home for Amazon for $10 an hour, of course, but even though we're technically at full employment in America, that's an economic term–of course there are still people who would like to be working but can't find jobs.

Among them: lots of stay-at-home moms, military spouses, and others who need income but might not have the flexibility to work outside their homes. Here's hoping other companies follow suit, and that these unemployed and underemployed workers might now have a steady, new, workable option.

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How Technology Is Changing The Future Of Our Grocery Stores

According to a recent report, analysts believe that the online grocery market will grow from 4% of total sales to 20% by 2025, which is not too far away. The study points out that while most people will be concerned that the rise of online grocery could kill brick and mortar stores, they also believe that grocery stores will actually adjust their strategies to appeal to the digital shopper.

Before they can arrive at this shopping destination utopia of the future, grocery stores need to make an increased investment in a multi-channel experience and have a greater focus on incentivized digital loyalty programs. If they successfully do that, grocery stores will be able to co-exist in an environment that is quickly changing.

Tom Caporaso, the CEO of Clarus Commerce, an e-commerce solutions provider believes that Amazon’s decision to test several Go store concepts highlights the potential opportunities in the grocery industry in the coming years.

Caporaso advised, after moderate grocery sales growth in recent years, Amazon sees a chance to implement new bricks-and-mortar models that cater to consumers’ changing behaviors. Meanwhile, a new report says that online spending on groceries could increase five-fold by 2025, from its current 4.3% share of the market to 20%.

Established supermarkets clearly have to step up their efforts to retain and grow their audiences. That includes enhancing their online capabilities; expanding their ordering, pick-up, and delivery services to better suit their customers; and creating a seamless, convenient shopping experience across multiple channels — computers, mobile devices, and the stores themselves.

It also includes strengthening their loyalty programs. Shoppers are already more likely to join grocers’ programs than those of other businesses, and more liable to shop and spend more at stores that reward them for doing so. Caporaso also believes the key is to engage them with compelling offers that meet their evolving interests and desires.

Interestingly, cash back and rebates rank just behind product discounts as the most attractive benefits among shoppers of all ages, including Millennials, who now make up the largest demographic.

Amazon and countless other companies now see a variety of growth opportunities in the grocery industry. Supermarkets, therefore, need to keep exploring new offers and approaches; analyze their customer data incessantly; and use the lessons learned to develop a broad range of services, benefits, and messages that appeal to an increasingly digital consumer audience.

There is no longer a one size fits all approach with shoppers seamlessly switching between the art of showrooming and webrooming depending on what type of item they are purchasing. Maybe, we shouldn’t be too surprised to see that Amazon is aggressively pushing forward into the grocery market and while physical store Walmart increases their online presence.

In commerce, the blurred lines that have existed between our online and offline worlds are rapidly disappearing. But this can only be a positive thing as companies begin to understand exactly what the digital transformation means for businesses.

It seems that the future success of retailers in our imminent future is not about being online or offline but both. Caporaso recently revealed further insight into this fascinating topic on my podcast where he also talks about the strategy that both Amazon and Wal-Mart are already following.

Retail
 
Startups
 
Technology
 Neil Hughes Neil Hughes
Owner • Tech Blog Writer

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