Tag Archives: card

Credit card with a fingerprint sensor revealed by Mastercard

By Samantha Smith
Technology reporter
The fingerprint sensor draws power from the terminal meaning it does not need batteries of its own
A payment card featuring a fingerprint sensor has been unveiled by credit card provider Mastercard.
The rollout follows two successful trials in South Africa.
The technology works in the same way as it does with mobile phone payments: users must have their finger over the sensor when making a purchase.
Security experts have said that while using fingerprints is not foolproof, it is a "sensible" use of biometric technology.
'Nine changes'
Mastercard's chief of safety and security, Ajay Bhalla, said that the fingerprint technology would help "to deliver additional convenience and security. It is not something that can be taken or replicated."
However, fingerprint sensors can be compromised.

Card holders must place their finger over the square sensor when using the card for a transaction

Karsten Nohl, chief scientist at Berlin's Security Research Labs, told the BBC: "All I need is a glass or something you have touched in the past."
He adds that if that information is stolen, "you only have nine fingerprint changes before you run out of options".
But Mr Nohl is cautiously optimistic about the technology, saying it is "better than what we have at the moment".
"With the combination of chip and PIN, the PIN is the weaker element. Using a fingerprint gets rid of that."
"Fingerprints have helped us avoid using terrible passwords, and even the most gullible person is not going to cut off their finger if [a criminal] asks nicely."
No scanner needed
The cards are thought to be the first to include both the digital template of the user's fingerprint and the sensor required to read their fingerprints at the point of sale.
Previous biometric payment cards only worked when used in conjunction with a separate fingerprint scanner.
That limited their usefulness, as only stores with the correct equipment could accept them.
Having both the data and the scanner on the same card means that they should be accepted everywhere a normal chip and PIN payment card can be used.
But the biometric verification can only be used for in-store purchases: online and other so-called "card not present" transactions will still require further security measures.

 

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

Buy Bitcoin with a credit card (beta)

Werner van Rooyen 
11 JAN 2017 • 3 minute read

At Luno, we focus on helping customers get Bitcoin in the easiest and fastest ways.

Bank transfers are by far the most common funding method supported by Bitcoin providers, including us. Customers make a deposit in their local currency, and then once the funds reflect, they use it to purchase Bitcoin.

This, however, is often a hurdle for new customers to buy Bitcoin: it just takes too much time.

The other hurdle is that we can only accept bank deposits from customers with bank accounts in our supported countries. This excludes many people from getting access to Bitcoin and our products.

We are excited with the slow rolling out of a new feature, still in beta testing mode: buying Bitcoin with a credit card.

We have partnered with Simplex to provide this feature. Simplex’ expertise lie in reducing credit card fraud – a key issue that prevents most Bitcoin trading platforms from accepting payments that way. They have extremely sophisticated tracking and monitoring systems and use tons of data points to identify potential fraud. This was very important to us.

All a customer needs to do is enter their credit card details and the amount of Bitcoin they wish to purchase in USD and in a few minutes, the transaction will be processed.

Please note:

Buying Bitcoin with a credit card on Luno is currently only available in India and most of Europe (Austria, Belgium, Switzerland, Cyprus, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, United Kingdom, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Latvia, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Sweden, Slovenia, Slovakia, Ukraine), but will come to more countries around the world soon.
Note that Simplex recently announced that they won't be able to support customers from Canada anymore.
Note that we have seen some credit cards being rejected while going through the process. This is usually due to your bank not approving the payment. In such cases, we would urge you to try another credit card if possible and make sure it is a reputed international credit card.
Customers who purchased Bitcoin with their credit card can safely store, spend or send it elsewhere. Currently, we/Simplex can't support the selling of Bitcoin that was bought with a credit card. We are working on solutions to get customers to sell their card-purchased Bitcoin using Luno. We'll send updates on this as the product evolves.
For step-by-step guidance on buying Bitcoin with your credit card, see our Help Centre article.
SUPPORTED COUNTRIES
Buying Bitcoin with a credit card on Luno is currently only available in Andorra, Argentina, Austria, Australia, Belgium, Bulgaria, Bahrain, Brunei Darussalam, Brazil, Bahama, Switzerland, Chile, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Gibraltar, Greenland, Guadeloupe, Greece, Hong Kong, Croatia, Hungary, Ireland, Isle of Man, India, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Latvia, Luxembourg, Republic of Moldova, Montenegro, Martinique, Malta, New Caledonia, Netherlands, Norway, New Zealand, Peru, French Polynesia, Poland, Puerto Rico, Portugal, Qatar, Reunion, Romania, Serbia, Saudi Arabia, Sweden, Slovenia, Slovakia, San Marino, Sint Maarten, Turkey, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom.

For Luno, this is a big step towards reaching our end goal: making Bitcoin easily accessible to everyone, everywhere.

You can expect to hear more updates and features like this in the near future.

Global
Avatar Werner van Rooyen
AUTHOR
Werner van Rooyen

Werner heads up Business Development and Growth at Luno. His passions include payments, e-commerce, technology, marketing and design: something that he has been fortunate enough to do on three different continents. Werner has lived and worked in South Africa, the United States, Indonesia, Taiwan and China.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

Thank you for your grace and kindness…

"No One":
For those of you who don't know, my youngest son, Christopher, is on the autistic spectrum. I went to his back to school night on Thursday and took a picture of one of his projects displayed on the wall, one of many cute little cards that all the kids in his class had filled out. It asked him to list his favorite foods, sport, TV shows etc.
I took the picture hurriedly, and didn't notice all the answers he had filled out at that time. It was only after I got home that something stood out upon closer review.
Do you guys remember, a couple of weeks ago, the massive amount of press that the Florida State Football player got when he sat down at the lunch table with an autistic boy that was eating alone? That player didn't know the boy was on the autistic spectrum when he sat down with him…he just saw a boy eating lunch all by himself and decided to join him. A teacher snapped a picture of the moment and it went viral. That's what made the story great….it wasn't staged…it was just a real moment of human kindness.
The follow up to that story was that the boy no longer ate alone; that the other kids NOW were sitting with him and patting him on the back. That boy now had "friends",B and everything was right with the world.
Something that wasn't right was fixed, and tied up neatly with a pretty little bow of kindness and understanding.
But in my head, I asked "Where were those kids prior to this child being thrust into the spotlight? We know where they were: they're in the picture: sitting at other tables, ignoring him.
If that football player had not sat down next to that child, and if it hadn't become a national news story, that kid would still be sitting by himself today.
And it's not their fault…. that's the saddest part. They were clearly not taught to embrace and accept the differences of others. Not by their teachers, which would have been nice, had they thought to do so, but by their parents. I don't mean to imply that parents that don't have this conversation with their kids are bad people, but only that somewhere in between working, soccer practice, and homework, it never occurred to them to have this particular conversation. I'm sure that if Christopher were typical (that's the word we use instead of "normal" in our world of 'Holland', for our developmentally delayed children), I would have not had this conversation with him either.
Christopher's brothers have had many, many sleepovers over the years, obviously in front of him, and it has not gone unnoticed.
"Can I have sleepover?" Christopher has asked.
"Sure, buddy….with whom?" As a response, he would flap his arms and stim instead of answeting. He didn't have an answer because he didn't have a name.
Because he didn't have a friend.
He's never had a friend.
Ever.
He just turned eleven.
And because he's had no friends….there was no one to invite.
And I don't have a solution. I don't have an answer. The reality is that I have to rely on the compassion of others to be incredibly understanding in order just to sit next to him, attempt to engage him, and make him feel included.
My son is very smart and has a great sense of humor. Every adult that meets him is drawn to him. However, because he needs the input, he will spontaneously flap his arms and make loud, guttural sounds from time to time. It draws a lot of attention in public. If you're not used to it, it's normal to feel embarrassed, as you will have all the eyes in the room upon you. He will ask the same question fifty times in a short period of time (His latest is "What time do you go to bed?" and "What's your addtess?").
I typically have to tell servers in restaurants just to give him the restaurant's address…as once he has a satisfactory answer, he will usually move on.
Like I said, there's no easy answer for this…at the end of the day it comes down to compassion, empathy and understanding.
But mostly empathy. Not from you guys, but from your children. As far as I know, (save for one time), Christopher's classmates have never been overtly cruel to him. What they have done, however, is to exclude him. And frankly, I understand this. His classmates are delayed as well, but most not as much as Christopher. They are figuring out how to interact socially every day, and because Christopher cannot engage them in a typical way, he gets left behind…excluded.
Until Thursday, I didn't know how aware he was of this divide, as he does not often talk about his peers. I should not have been surprised as he makes his wants (but not his emotional needs) very clear….but I was. Mostly, I suppose, because I had never seen him put in down on paper. For the first time, it was staring at me in the face.
I guess I'm sharing this because when asked to list his friends he wrote "no one". Never have five letters cut so deep, and they weren't even directed at me….it was just an overly simplistic statement that spoke volumes.
And because I know him so well, and because I have pretty good handle on him after raising him for eleven years, I know this disconnect makes him feel lonely, and it makes him sad.
Usually, I have to figure out what Christopher is trying to say, as his manner of speaking is very straightforward; very black and white.
This time I did not.
It's clear to me that he desperately wants to be part of the group, but his challenges make it difficult for his peers to include him.
The only solution I can come up with is to share this with you and ask that you have a conversation with your kids. Please tell them that children with special needs understand far more than we give them credit for. They notice when others exclude them. They notice when they are teased behind their back (a lot of times "behind their back" is right in front of them because they think the 'different' child doesn't understand). But mostly they are very much in tune when they are treated differently from everyone else.
Trust me when I tell you this hurts them. Even if it's not obvious to you and me.
For the first time ever, I'm going to ask for two favor, here, on Facebook.
One: Share this post on your time line. Awareness and empathy are the only solutions I can come up with.
Two: Speak with your children. Show them the video of the Florida State Football player. The Internet is full of feel-good stories about a special needs child being included. Remember the special needs child that was put in the basketball game for the last few minutes of the final game of the season? Very recently, there was the prom king who gave his crown to a special needs classmate.
These stories are newsworthy because they are unusual. We are not used to hearing about kids being kind to those that are different and unique.
I not so naive that I think this post is going to change the world. But, if, by sharing this, I can make you think about having a conversation with your children about empathy, about going out of their way to include those that are different from everybody else, especially if it goes against the group mentality, especially if it's not socially poplar (I'm not so old that I don't remember that this takes bravery…bravery to break from the confines of whet your friends think is cool in the middle and high school worlds), then I will feel like Christopher's voice has been heard.
Because even though he can't say it, he wants to be included.
He wants a voice, that, at the moment, he doesn't have.
And he needs help to find his voice.
And the child that will finally reach out to him, that will help him, that will include him, will be the kindest child, the child that does the right thing by going above and beyond.
He will be Charlie Bucket.
And that child will be Christopher's first true friend.
Thanks for listening.
Sincerely,
Christopher's Dad
UPDATE:
As I have just leaned that this has gone viral, All of the requests I have been receiving to write Christopher a letter or send a care package now make sense. This was an idea that was started by KMBZ radio personalities Dana and Scott, or one of their listeners to be precise, so this "card shower" is on its way.
Many of you have asked to send cards and packages to Christopher, so, please join the party…I will be posting his reactions online. You may write to him at: Christopher Cornelius….96 Valley View Drive…Rockaway NJ )7866. Thank you for your grace and kindness….it is very much appreciated!  Bob Cornelius

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e