Schlagwort-Archive: care

Do you worry about money?

3 reasons not to worry about money

Written by Hope on 08/03/2015
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Finances, Money, Worry
“Honor the Lord with your wealth and with the best part of everything you produce.” Proverbs 3:9

The Bible is full of stories showing God working in the lives of wealthy people. Abraham, Israel’s King David, and Lydia (a woman who sold purple dye) are just a few. But when Jesus also said that “it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter the Kingdom of God!” it was a warning that money can hurt more than it helps. (Matthew 19:24). How can you follow Jesus and His Word rather than letting money keep you from following God? Here are 3 truths to help.

Money Will Never Satisfy
Although money is not a bad thing, “the love of money is the root of all kinds of evil” (1 Timothy 6:10). Christians should not let anything–including money–interfere with their relationship with God. God is a great provider. Even among the wealthy, “those who love money will never have enough” (Ecclesiastes 5:10). The “happiness” found in things money can buy will not last, for “moths eat them and rust destroys them and thieves break through and steal.” (Matthew 6:19) Remember that Jesus gives His joy as a gift–and doesn’t take it back! (John 15:11)

God Gives What We Need
As Christians, we should strive to take good care of anything God blesses us with–including money. Our goal is to use money in a wise way. This includes providing for ourselves, our families and giving to support the local church. But how can you avoid worrying about money? God tells us to focus on Him. Jesus taught, “seek the Kingdom of God above all else, and live righteously, and He will give you everything you need” (Matthew 6:33). As you deal with and work for your money, “seek God’s will in all you do, and He will show you which path to take” (Proverbs 3:6).

If You Are Walking With God, Be Content As He Provides
The Apostle Paul famously wrote, “I have learned how to be content with whatever I have” (Philippians 4:11). God promised to provide for those who put Him first. So you do not have to “worry about anything; instead, pray about everything” (Philippians 4:6). Be faithful with your money, but when you feel worried, “give your burdens to the Lord, and He will take care of you” (Psalm 55:22). Christians can learn to “be satisfied with what you have, for God has said, ‘I will never fail you’” (Hebrews 13:5).

Pray this week:

that God will provide for you and help you learn to glorify Him with your financial resources.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

Reaching Out in Your Community

By going outside the church walls, we show God’s tangible love and care to many who have never seen it.

Written by Hope on 22/12/2013
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Church And Community, Service
"Work for the peace and prosperity of the city where I sent you into exile. Pray to the Lord for it, for its welfare will determine your welfare." Jeremiah 29:7
"Don’t forget to do good and to share with those in need. These are the sacrifices that please God." Hebrews 13:16

Recently, my church has started encouraging our congregation to get involved in local community service. Many people already serve inside the church — as teachers, cleaners, musicians, and more. But by going outside the church walls, we show God’s tangible love and care to many who have never seen it.

It can be as simple as picking up trash in a neighborhood, or as involved as starting a mentoring program for at-risk children at the local elementary school.

Also, you may find organizations near you that you can work with or pray for. Here are some kinds of groups that God might call you to serve with.

Rescue Mission
Jesus' brother posed the question, "If a brother or sister is poorly clothed and lacking in daily food, and one of you says to them, 'Go in peace, be warmed and filled,' without giving them the things needed for the body, what good is that?" (James 2:15-16). Rescue missions help provide for the basic needs of people who are homeless or impoverished. Right now, you can pray for these organizations that follow the Lord's example of caring for the poor. Ask the Lord if He is calling you to serve, donate to, or otherwise partner with a rescue mission.

Women's Shelter or Crisis Pregnancy Center
James gave further instruction: "Pure and genuine religion means caring for orphans and widows in their distress" (James 1:27). And the Apostle Paul told his disciple, Timothy, "Treat older women as you would your mother, and treat younger women with all purity as you would your own sisters. Take care of any widow who has no one else to care for her" (I Timothy 5:2-3). Ask the Lord if He is calling you to help protect the most vulnerable in your community — abused women, or the unborn.

Financial Ministry
Some ministries share the Gospel through loans for small business start-ups, according to this principle in Psalms: "[the godly] are generous, compassionate, and righteous. Good comes to those who lend money generously and conduct their business fairly" (Psalm 112:4-5). These ministries lend money for people to start small businesses, while teaching the borrowers about the Lord and how to grow in their faith. Successful small businessmen and women are able to provide for their families and build up their communities, repay their loans, and expand the ministry by lending money to other entrepreneurs. Ask the Lord if He is calling you to bless your community by working with this kind of ministry.

This week’s Prayer, Care, Share Guide below shows a different way we can care for others by caring for groups or organizations.

Prayer, Care, and Share Jesus
Pray this week:

You will be able to serve those in need.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

This Study Reveals The 5 Biggest Regrets People Have Before They Die

 

John-Paul Iwuoha
FollowJohn-Paul Iwuoha
Author, Business Strategist & Champion for Entrepreneurship in Africa
Do you have any regrets?

Most people do.

But it appears our regrets gain a lot of weight as we approach the end of our lives.

For many years, Bronnie Ware – an Australian nurse and counselor – worked in palliative care; taking care of terminally ill people, most of whom had less than 12 weeks to live.

Her patients were typically old people with very serious illnesses, waiting to die.

And a lot of her work involved providing counseling and relief from the physical and mental stresses that come naturally when a human being comes face to face with their mortality.

Death is not a comfortable subject for most people. We prefer to not think or talk about it.

But the sad truth is, all of us will die someday.

Knowing you are going to die in a few weeks is a very bitter pill to swallow. And Bronnie noticed as her patients experienced a range of emotions that usually started with denial, and then fear, anger, remorse, more denial, and eventually, acceptance.

As part of therapy, Bronnie would ask about any regrets they had about their lives, and anything they would do differently if life gave them a second chance.

Of all the responses she got from her patients, she noticed there were 5 regrets that stood out. These were the most common regrets her patients wished they hadn’t made as they coursed through life.

But the regrets of the dying can be sound and invaluable advice for the living.

And that’s why it’s a really good thing you’re reading this article.

One of the key revelations from Bronnie’s study is that we often take our lives for granted because we are healthy.

Health affords us boundless freedom very few realise, until we no longer have it.

But while her dying patients were helpless in the face of their regrets, you and I still have time to do something about our regrets, before it’s too late.

Let’s now look at each of the 5 most common regrets Bronnie observed:

1)    I wish I pursued my dreams and aspirations, and not the life others expected of me

According to Bronnie, this was by far the most common regret of all.

When people realise their life is coming to an end, it becomes easier to look back and see all those dreams they had but didn’t have the courage to pursue.

In many cases, their failure to pursue those dreams were often due to fitting into the expectations of others – usually family, friends and society.

One of her dying patients, Grace, made Bronnie promise that she would pursue all her dreams and live her life to its fullest potential without ever considering what others would say.

According to Bronnie, Grace was in a long but unhappy marriage. And after her husband was put in a nursing home, she was diagnosed with a terminal illness. And Grace’s biggest regret was that she never was able to pursue all the dreams she put on hold.

I think the biggest lesson from this regret is, if you know what really makes you happy, do it!

It appears that our unfulfilled dreams and aspirations have a way of silently stalking us, and eventually haunt our memories in our dying days.

And if you’re afraid of what people will say about your choices, remember that their voices will not matter to you in your dying days.

2)   I wish I didn’t work so hard

This one makes me feel guilty.

According to Bronnie, this regret came from every male patient she nursed. And a few female patients too.

As breadwinners, their lives were taken over by work, making a living, and pursuing a career. While this role was important, these patients regretted that they allowed work to take over their lives causing them to spend less time with their loved ones.

Their regrets were usually about missing out on the lives of their children and the companionship of their spouse.

When asked what they would do differently if given a second chance, the response was quite surprising.

Most of them believed that by simplifying our lifestyle and making better choices, we may not need all that money we’re chasing. That way, we can create more space in our lives for happiness and spend more time with the people who mean the most to us.

3)   I wish I had the courage to express my feelings and speak my mind

This one just made me so much bolder. 🙂

According to Bronnie, many of her dying patients believed they suppressed their true feelings and didn’t speak their mind when they should have, because they wanted to keep peace with others.

Most of them chose not to confront difficult situations and people, even when it offended them. By suppressing their anger, they built up a lot of bitterness and resentment which ultimately affected their health.

Worse still, harbouring bitterness can cripple you emotionally and stand in the way of fulfilling your true potential.

To avoid this type of regret later in life, it’s important to understand that honesty and confrontation are a necessary part of healthy relationships.

There is a common misconception that confrontation is bad for relationships and can only create division.

Not all the time.

In reality, when confrontation is kind, honest and constructive, it helps to deepen mutual respect and understanding and can take the relationship to a healthier level.

By speaking our minds, we express our true feelings and reduce the risks of building up unhealthy stores of bitterness that ultimately hurt us.

4)   I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends

This one is a regret many of us struggle with.

Bronnie found that her patients missed their old friends and regretted they didn’t give those friendships the investment of time and effort they deserved.

Everyone misses their friends when they’re dying.

It appears that when health and youth have faded, and death is looming, people realise that some friendships hold more value than all their wealth and achievements.

According to Bronnie, it all comes down to love and relationships in the end. Nothing else mattered to her patients in the last few weeks of their lives but love and relationships.

We live in a busy world these days. And the pressures and demands of work, city life and trying to raise a family can take its toll on some golden relationships.

Knowing this now, what would you do differently?

5)   I wish I had let myself be happier

This is a very humbling one, really.

Many of her patients didn’t realise until the end of their lives that happiness is a choice.

They wished they had known that happiness isn’t something to be chased and acquired through wealth, social acceptance and the trappings of life.

In their deathbeds, these patients realized they could have chosen to be happy, regardless of their circumstances in life – rich or poor.

To me, this regret is the most touching.

Throughout our active lives, we often focus too much on acquiring the things we would like to have – wealth, status, power and achievement. We often (wrongly) believe that these things hold the keys to our happiness.

When asked what they could have done differently, here’s the key message those dying folks shared: Learn to relax and appreciate the good things in your life. That’s the only way to find real happiness.

Happiness is a choice.

Is it possible to live a life without regrets?

This is the big question I’ve been asking myself.

As no human being is perfect, and I doubt there’s anything like a “perfect life”, I expect all of us would have some regret(s) in our dying days.

But I think the key is to have as few regrets as possible.

And the best way to die with very few regrets is to live life as if we would die today.

After all, almost nobody knows exactly when they’ll die.

By living our lives as if the end is nigh, we would realise that we really don’t have all the time in the world. As a result, we would procrastinate less, and pursue our truest desires, dreams and aspirations.

Also, to live a life of few regrets, we have to focus on and accommodate ONLY those things and people that make us happy. Because if we try to conform to the expectations of others and hide our true feelings, the regrets could haunt us later in life.

If you’re reading this article and you’re alive and healthy, you still have a choice.

Remember, you only live once!

Don't forget to share this article with people you care about. You may just save someone a ton of regrets.

I wish you an amazing life.

Best,

John-Paul

PS: Inspired by the regrets of the dying people she cared for, Bronnie Ware went on to become a writer and songwriter. The experience totally transformed her life and she is daring everyday to live up to her truest potential. She authored a full-length memoir about this experience titled ‘The Top Five Regrets of the Dying – A Life Transformed by the Dearly Departing’.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

Care for People All Around You

The book of Ruth in the Old Testament tells a beautiful story about love and loyalty among family.

Written by Hope on 28/04/2013
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: God, Love, Loyalty, Relationships
"And may the Lord make your love for one another and for all people grow and overflow, just as our love for you overflows." (1 Thessalonians 3:12)

The book of Ruth in the Old Testament tells a beautiful story about love and loyalty among family.

Naomi, an Israelite, had traveled with her husband and sons to the foreign land of Moab to escape a famine. Her sons married local women, one of them being Ruth. When the husband and the sons died, Naomi chose to return to Israel and her people.

Love Each Other
Naomi and her daughters-in-law loved each other dearly. Wanting them to be provided for, Naomi urged them to remain in Moab to remarry. However, Ruth chose to stay with Naomi, dedicated to serving her mother-in-law — and God. She demonstrated a love and loyalty the Apostles Paul and John would describe many years later: “those who won’t care for their relatives, especially those in their own household, have denied the true faith” (1 Timothy 5:8) and “those who love God must also love their Christian brothers and sisters” (1 John 4:21).

Avoid Evil and Pray
In Israel, Ruth provided for herself and Naomi by gathering leftover grain. She chose a field owned by Boaz, one of Naomi’s distant relatives. Boaz told Ruth to keep gathering on his land, where she’d be safe from dangerous men elsewhere. This mirrors God’s warning to His people against close contact with those who chose evil: “If you do, you will follow their evil ways and be trapped” (Exodus 34:12). If we can’t avoid harm, though, Jesus said to “Pray for those who hurt you” (Luke 6:28). We should avoid evil ways, but care about, and pray for, people who choose evil.

Care – No Matter What
Naomi loved Ruth, wanting to see her married and settled. She instructed Ruth to ask Boaz to take care of her (and Naomi) by marrying Ruth. Although Ruth was a poor foreigner, Boaz treated her with godly care and agreed. Jesus spoke of providing for others: “when you [cared for] one of the least of these people, you [cared for] Me” (Matthew 25:40). We, too, should show godly concern for others, especially those in need.

When Ruth chose to go with Naomi rather than stay with her own people, she said, “Wherever you go, I will go; wherever you live, I will live. Your people will be my people, and your God will be my God” (Ruth 1:16).

Naomi’s devotion to the Living God caused Ruth to turn from the idols of her native Moab. Wouldn’t it be awesome if your love for God and for people would inspire others to turn from sin and follow God?

Prayer, Care and Share Jesus
Care for people in need around you!

Scripture: "Then the King will say to those on his right, 'Come, you who are blessed by my Father; take your inheritance, the kingdom prepared for you since the creation of the world. For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me"

Then the righteous will answer him, 'Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, and thirsty and give you something to drink? When did we see you a stranger and invite you in, or needing clothes and clothe you? When did we see you sick or in prison and go to visit you?'

"The King will reply, 'Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.' (Matthew 25:35-40)

The Prayer, Care & Share Jesus guide, encourages you to care for people around you because of what Jesus said in the Bible. People in the passage above could hardly believe that Jesus compared their deeds for others to the way they served Jesus. But, it is really that important to Jesus because his love and care is unconditional and he wants us to live like He did as much as we can.

How do we care for people the way Jesus would every day? Be aware of the needs of people around you – for the homeless, the poor, the hungry, the broken, the discouraged. Use the Prayer Care Share guide as a way to reach out to them. Pray for God's blessing and care, on them. Prepare yourself to care for them. Remember, Jesus did warn that sometimes, the person he wants us to help, may be a person that we don’t want to help. But, he tells us to even love and pray for our enemies.

When someone has a need, you can help them or encourage them. Or if you can’t solve the problem, ask the Lord to solve it.

There are all kinds of things that cause people to be in need. Take a moment and think about ways people in your life may need to be cared for right now. They may be saying things like:

My child is ill.
My brother was wounded in battle.
I have no money for transport to go home today.
My mother is an alcoholic.
My computer crashed and I don’t know how to fix it.
I am writing an important test tomorrow and am worried about it.
I need a job.
When you hear this, it’s possible the Lord has called you to care for them. How will you respond to His call?

Pray this week:

The book of Ruth in the Old Testament tells a beautiful story about love and loyalty among family.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e