Tag Archives: do

Bitcoin surpasses GOLD..AGAIN!! Making this Round 2… Will it hold?

thearcanebear57 in bitcoin
Fun little moment…

Bitcoin has had its amazing runs, and to see it for the second time surpass gold; is absolutely amazing. These are crazy times, banks are in negative interest rates in many places around the world. A "la la" land revolving around this ever prevalent debt scheme. This is a good sing, it means even the traditional investor is forced to look at this technology. For those who don;'t know about blockchain and are in the banking industry. They should probably quite and find something new.
Prices sourced from Google and   http://goldprice.org

Arcane Conclusions

WE are still getting used to the future, and our outlook is bright., Hard times ahead, but many amazing things to look forward to.
Thank you for joining our Journey  Tijo http://@thearcane

http://www.arcanebear.com

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

Finance Needs A 20/20 Vision On The Business

Published on March 20, 2017Featured in: Banking & Finance, Business Strategies, Operations
LikeFinance Needs A 20/20 Vision On The Business104Comment4ShareShare Finance Needs A 20/20 Vision On The Business69
Anders Liu-Lindberg
Anders Liu-Lindberg
FollowAnders Liu-Lindberg
Finance Master | Finance Transformation Expert | THE Finance Business Partner | Writer
In order to drive value creation in a business, it’s important that all employees and functions focus on doing what they do best. Sales should focus on meeting customers, explaining the value proposition and closing deals, operations should focus on delivering the product as agreed, procurement needs to secure the lowest possible price from the vendors etc. No frontline function that’s involved in running the business will have an in-depth view of what’s going on in other functions and how they’re performing. Their view is so to speak limited to any handover points they might have. Now does that mean that it’s only the CEO that has the full overview of what goes on in the business? No, of course not, and here we enter the support functions. Support functions like HR, IT and Finance support all parts of the business having a focus on people, digitalization and business performance to name a few. They are, however, doing it from their own point of view and despite supporting the whole business their view could be limited too.

Finance needs to have a full overview of the business

If we then zoom in on Finance and discuss how good a view the function has on the business it’s clear that without having a 20/20 vision on the business, Finance will fall short on supporting the business and the CEO, in particular, on driving business performance and value creation. By 20/20 vision is meant the following starting with the official definition.

” 20/20 vision  is a term used to express normal visual acuity (the clarity or sharpness of vision) measured at a distance of 20 feet. If you have 20/20 vision, you can see clearly at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. If you have 20/100 vision, it means that you must be as close as 20 feet to see what a person with normal vision can see at 100 feet.”
To translate it into the current context it’s not asking for something superhuman when wanting Finance to have a 20/20 vision on the business. Essentially Finance should see what goes on in each part of the business like a normal person but not like a specialist who would see things even clearer (and yes it’s possible to have a better vision than 20/20). By having this vision into the business, Finance would be able to not only have a full overview of the business but more importantly be able to have a performance dialogue in a business context rather than a pure numbers context.

If you only know the numbers you won’t get a seat at the table

I’ve previously described how simply knowing the numbers is no longer enough to get you a seat at the table. Here I’m then making it clear that without having a view on the business and being able to contextualize the numbers you will get stuck outside the door. It’s important to note the essential point about the 20/20 vision again. As a finance professional supporting the business, you’re not supposed to see what goes on in each function as well as those that work there. You’re not asked to become as good as the specialist although naturally the more you understand of a given function the better you will be able to support it. This is especially true if you’re a finance business partner and tasked with supporting a specific function. Then it’s not uncommon to encounter an expectation that you need to develop a better than 20/20 vision on this function. Only then will you be able to become a true sparring partner to the business leaders in the function.

There are many things you need to do and can do to develop a 20/20 vision on the business but here I will refer you to past and future articles where this has and will be covered extensively. For now, I will leave it by asking how good is your vision into the business and what are you doing to improve that vision? Luckily, unlike your eyesight, in most cases, you can actually improve this vision and if Finance should truly help create value this is a must!

To stay updated on this topic and in particular on how Finance can help the business create value I would encourage you to follow my “value-series” where you can find past articles below. To be sure to stay informed about future articles you can either connect with me or join my group Finance Business Partner Forum. Last but not least you can also follow me on Twitter.

Anders Liu-Lindberg is the Senior Finance Business Partner for Maersk Line Europe Region and is working with the transformation of Finance and business on a daily basis. I have participated in several transformation processes among others helping Maersk Drilling to go Beyond Budgeting and transformed a finance team from Bean-counters to Business Partners. I would love the chance to collaborate with you on your own transformation processes to help you stay out of disruption. If you are looking for more advice on how to get the most of LinkedIn I also have a few tips to share as well as if you want help in your job search. Don’t be shy! Let’s get in touch and start helping each other.

LikeFinance Needs A 20/20 Vision On The BusinessCommentShareShare Finance Needs A 20/20 Vision On The Business
FollowAnders Liu-Lindberg
Anders Liu-Lindberg
Finance Master | Finance Transformation Expert | THE Finance Business Partner | Writer

 

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

How Nigerians use Bitcoin

Werner van Rooyen 
Over the past few months, Bitcoin adoption in Nigeria has increased dramatically. Not only does the African country top Google Trends charts for Bitcoin-related searches, but wallet downloads and trading volumes are also growing exponentially.

As the virtual currency continues to gain ground, we asked our Nigerian customers: how do you view Bitcoin and what do you do with it?

Below are the results in an infographic on how often they use their Bitcoin wallets, if they use it more as a payments system or an investment tool, whether they trust it or not and what they think the Bitcoin price will be over time.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

Will Blockchain Technology be the Ultimate Disruptor? Harvard Says Yes!

Say goodbye to the middle-man for your financial transactions. Blockchain technology will change the way you do everything.
  
     By Marissa Levin 
Founder and CEO, Successful Culture@marissalevin

 "Imagine a technology that could preserve our freedom to choose for ourselves and our families, to express these choices in the world, and to control our own destiny, no matter where we lived or were born. What tools and jobs could we create with those capabilities? What new business and services? How should we think about the opportunities?" 
— Don Tapscott and Alex Tapscott, Blockchain Revolution, How the Technology behind Bitcoin is Changing Money, Business, and the World

Until recently, we've relied on trusted intermediaries to send information over the internet. In 2008, a pioneering payment method and cryptocurrency entered the market–bitcoin. The technology behind it, called blockchain, has forever changed both online payment and information sharing networks.

To learn more about this emerging business technology, I interviewed blockchain expert Jeremy Epstein.

Blockchain's claim to fame is its ability to fully encrypt personal data on the internet, allowing for the digital translation of assets and the elimination of need for a protective middle man. Essentially, this new cryptotechnology enables secure-funds transactions and ensures that data cannot be hacked by outsiders.

Epstein explained that blockchain is a "distributed ledger." It's not a database sitting in an office. It's a database that everyone can access.

"We're seeing decentralization and a paradigm shift of moving from institutions to ourselves. Power has been given back to the business owners, who no longer need to rely on the permission of banks and governments to send money electronically," says Epstein.

When you use a bank as an intermediary to transfer funds to another person by check, each person involved in the transaction has a separate record. The bank doesn't know right away that the person writing the check has a balance to cover the amount written out–there is an element of trust, and things can go wrong.

Epstein stated, "We've been built to have other organizations be custodians of our assets (like banks). However there have been more and more violations of our data–just look at the S & L scandal, 2008 mortgage crisis, and common accounts of fraud."

Conversely, Blockchain allows for privacy in the combination of records and the elimination of any intermediaries. Both parties can view the encrypted ledger and see any mutual transactions, but no one party controls it. Rather, each transaction is a block that is added to a chain once all parties affirm the block is correct. The chain itself is protected by cryptography.

Epstein asserts, "nobody can manipulate the system or go back and over-write it. It is chronological and time stamped." Overall, this technology is empowering people worldwide to push costly intermediaries to the side by giving them the ability to both authenticate and perform direct, immediate transactions with others.

Epstein explained that "Anything valuable can now become digitized. What's so powerful about blockchain is that everything we have seen with decentralization of data will now happen with assets."

With blockchain, data is split up and distributed in pieces, all over the internet. However, only one person is able to put the data back together–the owner. The control of the asset stays with the owner of the asset and all is done without third party intermediaries.

"Think of anything valuable you have – your car, house, jewelry, etc. These assets are not digital, but blockchain allows you to create a digital asset that represents that physical asset," says Epstein.

"With blockchain, everyone is able to clearly see who the owner of the asset is, but only the person with the right key can unlock the door of that asset.

Think about the title of the asset – it would be in your control. This is why people buy title insurance. Blockchain lets us buy and sell any asset without an intermediary. Additionally, the asset is programmable, so you can set up business rules and computational logic for each asset. For instance, you could put in place a rule that states, 'I can't sell this without others signing off.' Thus, the asset cannot be not sold unless business rules are met."

According to Harvard research, Blockchain also maximizes transparency and anonymity. Each transaction is seen by anyone who has access to the chain; however, since each node (or user) has a unique alphanumeric identifier, each user has the ability to decide whether to remain anonymous in the transaction between addresses. These transactions can also be programmed with algorithms that can automate transactions between users.

Why Blockchain Hasn't Caught On Yet

Trust Issues. Epstein emphasized the issue of believability and gaining trust of users. He said, "How will people get their head around this technology? Is it possible for individuals and companies to believe that they are safer having your money in their phone or computer instead of a bank?" Building this trust and credibility will take time.

Stigma. Harvard found that some industries may view blockchain as "disruptive" because it "can attach a traditional business model with a lower-cost solution and overtake incumbent firms quickly." However, they argue that blockchain is most importantly a foundational technology that can be used to create new business models and underpin business, economic, and social infrastructure.

Novelty. It will take decades for blockchain to seep into our economic and social infrastructure. The process of adoption will be gradual and steady. Esptein agrees, saying that, "it is still very, very early. Think Internet circa 1993."

Adoption. Epstein shares that the financial services market has implemented blockchain technology most. They're looking to improve efficiencies with cross-border transactions. Bitcoin is the most well-known blockchain application.

Essentially, "Email is to the internet the way bitcoin is to blockchain. There are multiple apps, just like there are multiple blockchains," says Epstein.

Blockchain is still in its early stages, and new cryptotechnology applications and advancements are regularly occurring. We expect big changes over the next few years, as over $1 billion has been invested into this tech by venture capitalists.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

Meet the $21 Million Company That Thinks a New iPhone Is a Total Waste of Money

IFixit's founders, Kyle Wiens (left) and Luke Soules, have built a thriving company around a pretty radical idea. CREDIT: Alex V. Murawski

The guys behind iFixit want to show you how to fix everything from your iPhone to your toaster–for free. By doing so, they've built a huge business. Even though Apple totally hates them.
 IFixit's founders, Kyle Wiens (left) and Luke Soules, have built a thriving company around a pretty radical idea. CREDIT: Alex V. Murawski
  
"Here–stand on that," says Kyle Wiens, positioning himself opposite his visitor and reaching for the switch. Then comes the electric hum, followed by the soft jolt and the ground receding. It's a car lift, mechanic's grade, salvaged from a dealership, reinstalled on a concrete pad in Wiens's backyard in Atascadero, California. 

Wiens–who's wearing jeans, a checkered shirt, steel-rimmed glasses, and the kind of haircut you might give yourself with a pair of dull scissors–has about two sloping acres on a rise overlooking U.S. Highway 101, midway between Los Angeles and San Francisco. The high hills beyond are green from this winter's drenching rains. There's a stucco main house, a prefab outbuilding, a chicken coop, a patio with a monster grill, and a work shed that houses motorcycles, dirt bikes, kayaks, wetsuits, a generator, a compressor, a welding torch, hammers, wrenches, and drills, as well as several small piles of disassembled equipment: his many works in progress. The lift is just outside the shed. Wiens uses it for jobs most people would delegate to a professional, like swapping out the transmission on a truck. And for cheap thrills: "It's so cool!"

IFixit co-founders Kyle Wiens (left) and Luke Soules in a loft atop a rock-climbing wall. Note the strategically placed iFixit logos on their laptops.CREDIT: Shaughn and John
It's also there because fixing stuff is his life's work. Wiens, 33, is co-founder and CEO of iFixit, a company whose mission, he says, is to "teach everybody how to fix everything." On iFixit's website is a vast library of step-by-step instruction sets covering, well, let's see: how to adjust your brakes, patch a leaky fuel tank on a motorcycle, situate the bumper sensor on a Roomba vacuum cleaner, unjam a paper shredder, reattach a sole on a shoe, start a fire without a match, fill a scratch in an eyeglass lens, install a new bread-lift shelf in a pop-up toaster, replace a heating coil in an electric kettle, and–iFixit's specialty–perform all manner of delicate repairs on busted Apple laptops and cell phones. More than 25,000 manuals in all, covering more than 7,000 objects and devices. Last year, according to Wiens, 94 million people all over the world learned how to restore something to tiptop working condition with iFixit's help, which frankly was a little disappointing. Wiens's goal was 100 million.

Some of the knowledge stored on iFixit's website is produced internally. Most comes, wiki-style, from the world at large. Either way, the information is always free. You don't have to register. There's no advertising. IFixit makes about 90 percent of its revenue from selling parts and tools to people who wouldn't know what to do with them if iFixit weren't also giving away so much valuable information. The rest comes from licensing the software iFixit developed to write its online manuals, and from training independent repair technicians, some 15,000 so far, who rely on iFixit to run their own businesses.

"We impact the economy in a far bigger way than we capture ourselves," Wiens allows. He's OK with that. That's how you get to everybody and everything. But it's a real business. A 14-year-old, 125-employee, five-time Inc. 5000 honoree growing 30 percent year over year, iFixit topped $21 million in sales in 2016 and delivers steady profits. "We give away a whole lot for free," says co-founder Luke Soules, who's 32. "We like that, and it still works, even if only a fraction of those people give us money."

Consider how we as consumers relate to our electronic gadgets and gizmos. We can't live without them, but we have no more idea about what goes on beneath their shiny exteriors than the apes did about the monolith in 2001: A Space Odyssey. When they break, we feel helpless; we want a new one right away. But there are consequences to consuming like that–environmental consequences, as our discarded toxic technology makes its way into landfills and dumps; resource consequences, as finite supplies of crucial elements like iridium are rapidly consumed and discarded; eco­nomic consequences, as we recklessly empty our pockets to keep pace with the latest and greatest; and human conse­quences, as we grow increasingly frustrated by the magical objects on which we depend.

IFixit and its noble mission may not seem like much of a threat to anyone, least of all the most profitable company on the planet, but Apple has been watching iFixit carefully. Apple doesn't like iFixit, because iFixit writes its own in-house versions of Apple's top-secret repair manuals and shares them with all comers. It sells reverse-engineered Apple-equivalent parts and bundles them with custom-designed picks, tweezers, spudgers (tiny plastic chisels), and screwdrivers in affordable, everything-you-need kits. Working with iFixit, you can replace a cracked screen or a fried battery for a lot less than if you were to take your problem to an Apple store, which might not be an option for you anyway, depending on where you live. Plus, iFixit won't try to sell you a new phone. (Apple ignored repeated requests to comment for this story.)

IPhones equipped with new iFixit replacement screens, awaiting testing.CREDIT: Shaughn and John
Then again, iFixit doesn't like Apple either. At iFixit headquarters in San Luis Obispo, California, the recycling goes in cans labeled with iFixit's logo–it resembles a Phillips screw head–while the cans with the Apple logo are for trash. In eight state legislatures across the country, the two companies are fighting over so-called right-to-repair laws (see "You Gotta Fight for Your Right to Repair," below) that, if passed, will loosen Apple's strict, cradle-to-grave control over everything it sells and eat into its stupendous repair revenue. Apple doesn't report just how huge that repair revenue is, but trade journal Warranty Week estimates that one proxy for that–sales of Apple's extended-warranty repair program, AppleCare–delivered the company a staggering $5.9 billion worldwide in 2016. "It's the world's largest extended-warranty program," says Warranty Week editor Eric Arnum. "Bigger than GM's. Bigger than Volkswagen's. Bigger than Best Buy's or Walmart's."

IFixit wouldn't be here if it weren't for Apple and everything about it–its innovation, its ubiquity, and its arrogance. IFixit is basically a parasite if you think about it that way. Or maybe a pilotfish, swimming with the shark and subsisting on its leftovers. Yet that doesn't begin to capture the fullness of this company's radical mission, or the ambition of its founders, both of which Wiens has spent much time reflecting on.

"I'm really concerned about the transition in society to a world where we don't understand what's in our things," he says. "Where we are afraid of engineering, afraid of fact, afraid of tinkering. When you take something like a phone or voice recorder and you take it apart and you understand it enough to be able to fix it, a switch flips in your brain. You go from being just a consumer to being someone who is actually a participant." This may not be as cool as having your own backyard car lift. But still, it's pretty cool.

Wiens and Soules both grew up in Oregon, but they didn't meet until they got to California Polytechnic State University, where the motto is "Learn by doing." That was 2003, and they've been together ever since–as friends, roommates, 50-50 business partners, and river kayaking buddies. (When Wiens announced he was getting married, his other friends told him he would have to divorce Soules first.) Wiens talks more than Soules and sleeps less; he's the public face of iFixit, its chief explainer and grand strategist. Soules oversees operations and manages iFixit's China supply chain; he's also a pilot and a clarinetist. At Cal Poly, they bonded over their shared geekiness. "I remember him going home for Christmas break," says Soules. "He had a big, old-fashioned desktop computer. He brought it with him on the train."

Wiens's other computer was an Apple iBook G3, the curvy, candy-colored laptop known as the "toilet seat Mac." He dropped it one day, and it broke. Wiens was unfazed. As kids, he and his brother were always taking apart and reassembling old radios and kitchen appliances that their grandfather bought for them at Goodwill. He "spent his life making and maintaining things," Wiens wrote of his grandfather in a eulogistic essay published on The Atlantic's website in 2013; he schooled Wiens in the war against "entropy: the second law of thermodynamics that guarantees everything will eventually wear out"; and he sent him off to college with a toolkit and a soldering iron.

IFixit staffer Alec Thille, at his desk at company headquarters.CREDIT: Shaughn and John
Wiens needed a G3 repair manual. He searched in vain online. Apple doesn't share such knowledge with its customers. That ticked him off. It was his computer, after all. Bought and paid for. Why shouldn't he have access to its inner workings? "This shall not stand," Wiens remembers thinking, and so was born the idea for a business.

Wiens and Soules worked it out over the next several years. Initially, they thought they'd write their own repair manuals and sell them, but–first lesson–information is a tough sell. (No one would pay for eHow's articles or videos, either.) Parts and tools, on the other hand, aren't, so Wiens and Soules became online resellers, clearing out the screwdriver shelves at Sears, ordering hard-to-get parts from catalogs, and filling orders, Michael Dell-like, from their dorm. They called their fledgling company PowerBook Fixit, until Wiens got scared that Apple might hunt them down for trademark infringement. Next, they tried PBFixit, which didn't stick either. "People thought it stood for peanut butter," says Soules. Still, people came. "We didn't make money our first month," says Wiens. "We made money our second month. And we've made money ever since."

They roomed together, sleeping in bunk beds so they'd have more space for inventory. Sophomore year, they moved off campus to a two-bedroom apartment, and eventually to a three-bedroom house with a three-car garage that served as a parts warehouse. Taking care of business while keeping up with classes presented certain challenges. "I'd be on the phone with a customer, trying to walk them through installing their hard drive, and I'm looking at the clock thinking, 'I have a midterm across town in 20 minutes,' " says Wiens. "You can't tell the customer that." Eventually, they hired help. One day, an employee arrived for work at the house having forgotten his key, so he picked the lock. The boss was impressed. "To this day, we still teach lock-picking to new employees," Wiens says. (At times, iFixit has sold branded lock-pick sets despite certain complications; it's illegal to ship them via U.S. mail.)

"In the beginning, we were very carefully iterating on the customer experience around parts," says Wiens. "Then customers would say, 'Well, that's fine, but how do we install it?' So we wrote them a manual. And they would say, 'Well, that's fine, but we don't have tools,' and so we sold them the tools. And they would say, 'Well, the tools are too expensive,' so then we started building kits and just bundled the tools into the price of the parts. It turns out that we were doing something that nobody else in the parts business was."

The year they graduated, 2007, was the same year the iPhone made its debut, presaging a dramatic shift in their revenue stream from fixing computers to fixing handheld devices. What had begun as a part-time gig was by now a profitable, fast-growing business. It didn't provide them with just spending money while they were in college–it paid for college. It also covered the down payment on the $690,000 house in Atascadero that would serve them over the years, sometimes overlappingly, as their shared home, an employee bunkhouse, and iFixit's headquarters. "This could very well be a career for us," Soules remembers thinking senior year; the thought had never occurred to him before. So much for worrying about finding a job.

IFixit staffers pitching in to process the company's latest delivery of its tools inventory from its suppliers. This time around, iFixit received more than 2,000 boxes.CREDIT: Shaughn and John
The front door at iFixit headquarters on the edge of downtown San Luis Obispo is locked. A sign says "by appointment only." There is a bell, however, to which a smiling, bearded 20-something responds. He leads the way through an empty waiting room into a steel-girded, skylighted barn, filled with other bearded 20-somethings and a few of their female counterparts. This building used to be the car dealership where Wiens got his lift. He left the other lift out back for his employees' benefit, though it's not clear how many drive, much less own cars. On their first day, all iFixit workers receive–in addition to a desk, in parts, which they're expected to assemble themselves–$400 toward the purchase of a bike. The parking lot is mostly empty.

Renovating the place took more than a year. The biggest challenge, Wiens says, was figuring out how to insert an upper level into the existing framework and make everything watertight without bringing down the roof. ("It's much harder to repurpose and reuse an existing building than to build a new one from scratch," he concedes, irony apparently unintended.) There's a grand staircase bisecting the central atrium, made with recycled acacia and walnut. Twin monitors on the landing track global activity on the website. The paneling at the top of the stairs is made with two-by-four oak-flavor planks, discarded by the region's wineries. It smells good in here. Not like wood or wine, but familiar and clean. Like a freshly opened box of electronics.

Soules is visiting the company's suppliers in China this week, but Wiens is at his second-floor "desk." It's a treadmill set to walking pace, facing a high-top table holding a stack of outdated software manuals, repurposed as a platform for his laptop.

Wiens doesn't advertise it, but he's a devout Christian. Jen Wiens, iFixit's company chef, wasn't sure what to make of her future husband the first time they met, in Bible class–an insistent chatterbox, a voracious reader (later she would learn that he listens to audio books at double speed), a man given to big ideas and noble pronouncements. "I worked at a law firm downtown," she says. "I was always pretty tired from a 14-hour day. He would sit next to me and just keep talking. He was always really excited. Eventually, I decided maybe I should pay attention."

One of the first times they hung out together, Kyle told Jen that he wanted to change the world. He was still in college, still working out the details of his big vision for "fighting the growth of disposable culture," as he would write years later in iFixit's employee handbook (a 50-page manifesto illustrated with drawings lifted from a 1903 edition of the Boy Scout handbook), "promoting sustainable design, defending ownership rights, and shedding light on the devastating effects of electronic waste." Kyle wasn't quite there yet, though it was clear to Jen even then that when Kyle talked about changing the world, he meant something more than disrupting some tiny corner of the tech industry and making a lot of money for himself. "I knew where he was going," she says.

Where he was going, of course, was this business that would eventually infuriate Apple. But it would also thrill a few enlightened corporate allies–notably Patagonia, which partners with iFixit to help fulfill the lifetime guarantee it offers on all branded gear. "We're really impressed with their ethos," says Nellie Cohen, Patagonia's "worn wear" program manager.

In some ways, iFixit is a conventional success story. It's made money, certainly, though not as much as it could have if that had been the main goal all along. One reason its founders stopped applying for inclusion on the Inc. 5000 several years ago, according to Wiens, is they weren't interested in hearing from any more potential investors. "I think we're both scared of the responsibility to grow and make money at all costs that that would bring," says Soules. And already iFixit has had far more impact, in its own industry and beyond, than companies many times its size–remember, it reached 94 million do-it-yourselfers last year, and has trained thousands of technicians scattered across the U.S.

"I can't think of anything else as exciting as this or as needed," Wiens says. In a world marked by a huge economic divide, he is convinced–as well as convincing–that iFixit can help make owning technology more affordable while creating opportunities for independent repair shops. Add to that the environmental benefit of throwing less stuff away, and maybe the human benefit of making us all just a little bit happier.

One of Wiens's favorite books is Matthew Crawford's Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry Into the Value of Work. Crawford, a research fellow at the University of Virginia, has an undergraduate degree in physics and a PhD in political philosophy. His book ties all that together with lessons learned in his other career, as a motorcycle mechanic. "We evolved to be tool users," Crawford says. "What people are looking for is that basic experience of individual agency, to see the effect of your own actions and take care of your own shit."

That Wiens and Soules have created a booming business that can help with that? Very cool.

You gotta fight for your right to repair
Eight states are mulling legislation that would thrill iFixit–and anger Apple.

The first car I owned was a 1970-something Ford Maverick. When you opened up the hood, it was easy to do whatever you had to do–new plugs, new belts, oil change. Cars today are packed to the gills with circuitry and software. But that doesn't mean they're unfixable by anyone other than the manufacturer, despite what car companies would have us believe.

A set of screwdriver heads, waiting to be mounted on an iFixit-branded handle. On their first day at iFixit, new employees are given a desk. There's one catch: They have to assemble it themselves.CREDIT: Shaughn and John
Such was the impetus behind Massachusetts's Right to Repair ballot initiative of 2012, which voters approved by 86 percent to 14 percent. It gave car owners and independent repair shops access to the same diagnostic tools, repair manuals, and firmware that licensed dealers have.

Now lawmakers in eight states are pursuing legislation that would extend the concept to cover computers, smartphones, and tractors. "Repair is impossible without access and information," says Gay Gordon-Byrne, executive director of the lobbying firm Repair Association. One such bill was introduced in January by Lydia Brasch, a state senator for a rural district in northeastern Nebraska. She's tired of driving 80 miles to Omaha–to the only Apple store in Nebraska–to get her computer fixed. Her husband, Lee, is a fifth-generation corn and soybean farmer who's had similar issues with his $300,000 John Deere combine. (John Deere, says Gordon-Byrne, is "the Apple of farming.")

Apple, which did not respond to multiple requests to comment for this story, is not happy with what's happening in Nebraska–and Kansas, Minnesota, New York, Tennessee, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Wyoming. Recently, the company sent a delegation to the state capitol in Lincoln to have a word with Brasch. Apple's lobbyists were "respectful," she reports. They offered to back off if she exempted smartphones. Then they tried to scare her, warning if the bill passed, Nebraska would be "a mecca for hackers and bad actors."

But Brasch isn't buying it. "How many billions do you need?" she wonders. "There should be a little piece of the apple for the rest of us to share."

If I can do it, you can do it
I put one of iFixit's kits to the test, on my busted up old iPhone.

My work-issued iPhone 5C worked fine until one day it didn't. The screen fizzed out. No cracks in the glass, just a dense net of wavy vertical lines, rendering the display unreadable. Apple says that its phones should last three years. Mine made it two and a half.

By then, the warranty had expired, which might have bothered me if I were paying, but I wasn't. Work sent me a replacement and the 5C went into a drawer, where according to a study sponsored by SellCell.com, a reseller, some $13 billion worth of old cell phones reside.

Then I heard about iFixit and I wondered: Could a doof like me really fix my old phone? I was encouraged to learn that the 5C earns a reparability score of six from iFixit, on a scale of one to 10, which isn't bad. (My new Galaxy S6 Edge only gets a three.) And that my specific job, a front panel replacement, involved 32 steps, would require 30 minutes to an hour to complete, and had a difficulty rating of "moderate"–not "easy," but not "very difficult" either. I ordered the full kit, parts, and tools, for $54.95, plus shipping.

The first thing I did when my package arrived was watch the six-minute tear-down video on iFixit's website. Then I dove into the illustrated instructions. Step 12, removing the four infinitesimally small Phillips screws that secure the front panel assembly cable bracket to the logic board, caused me the most anxiety. The screws look identical, but they're not. "Accidentally using the 3.25 mm screw or the 1.7 mm screw in the bottom right hole will result in significant damage to the logic board causing the phone to no longer boot properly," I read.

I wasn't certain at the time that I hadn't made that mistake. (I recommend clearing off your workspace before you begin; a magnetic mat would have been helpful too.) Still, I persevered. After reinserting the last two "Pentalobe" security screws (Apple nomenclature) that seal the case, I pushed the power button, held my breath, and beheld with pride a glowing screen. My old 5C, good as new. I showed my wife. 

 

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

What To Do When Someone Tells You You’re Not Good Enough

Throughout my career, I've been plagued by people telling me I'm not good enough. I've been rejected for more jobs than I care to remember. I've heard every excuse in the book for not being hired. Some of them were quite absurd and hard to swallow.

I've had my share of toxic bosses who have tried to hold me back. They used every chance they could get to put me down in an effort to make themselves look smart. They took credit for my ideas and then blamed me for their own failures.

After a while, it's hard not to start believing your haters. I know I did. My career began to plummet as a result. There will always be voices telling you you're not good enough. Telling you you're wasting your time and you should just give up.

Just because someone holds a fancier title than you or has a larger ego, doesn't mean they know what is best for your career. Many people in management positions are still trying to figure it out for themselves.

A few years ago, I fell into this trap. I started to believe that people with senior titles knew more than I did. Instead of continuing to work hard and push to move forward in my career, I began to accept the limitations that others were casting on me. The negative voices in my life were starting to drag me down.

The most difficult part of my journey has been to believe in myself and not listen to the people who were trying to hold me back. I love this quote from, Sean Stephenson: "Never believe a prediction that doesn't empower you."

Before I started blogging, I sought out advice from my boss, friends, family, and my mentors at the time. Not a single one of them advised me to start writing. Little did they know it would be my blogs that would propel my career forward and enable me to pivot into something I love.

Use your haters as an instrument for change and personal growth.

You don't have to listen to what everyone else thinks.
Always remember, the people who say you can't do something can't do it either! Not one person I sought advice from about starting a blog had ever made a dime from writing.

To overcome the negative voices of your haters, you need to seek out mentors who have been where you'd like to go. Seek out people who will coach you and empower you along your journey.

A good mentor will challenge you to get better. A good mentor will point out your shortcomings and tell you why you weren't good enough that particular day. However, unlike a hater, a good mentor will provide you with solutions for growth. These are the voices you should listen to.

To find success, keep grinding, improving your existing skills, and learning new ones.

Every day in life you have a choice to either listen to your haters and give in to self-doubt or go out there and make the changes you need to improve. Do something small each day to improve your career, and over time those small steps will turn into something big.

I've put the days of listening to haters in the past, and it's been amazingly liberating. Once I finally made this decision, it empowered me to begin achieving in my career again.

Originally published on my column in Inc. Magazine

 John White, MBA John White, MBA
Columnist • Inc Magazin

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

How Do You Know That God Is Faithful?

The moon is a faithful witness in the sky

Written by Susan on 30/08/2016
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Faithfulness, God, Love
It will be as eternal as the moon, my faithful witness in the sky!

Psalm 89:37
Let us explore one aspect of God’s character today: faithfulness. One Word is not enough to describe God. God is many, many things, and faithful is just one of them.

As sinful, fallen people, we may doubt His faithfulness, or not fully trust it at times. We run across hard times like the loss of a job, a broken marriage, or financial struggle and we question things. However, God is always faithful. When we come to understand that, we are able to feel more and more blessed by it!

Here are three ways we can better understand how God is always faithful:

1. His faithfulness is constant, like the moon in the sky.
“It shall be established forever like the moon, and the witness in the sky is faithful.” (Psalm 89:37)

God has placed a constant reminder of His faithfulness in the sky. It may seem strange to think of the moon as a reminder of faithfulness, but remember that God created this good world for us to live in and enjoy.

Did you know that the moon stabilizes the rotation of the earth? All of our being depends on God’s intricate design! It is over time that we begin to realize that He can be trusted to be who He says He is.

His faithfulness can be known through His creation. Imagine all the detail that went into making our world! Continue to look at the moon as an example of who God is, how He loves us, and the way He has made the world for us to live in.

2. God’s faithfulness makes it possible to trust Him with the details.
“I will instruct you and teach you in the way you should go; I will counsel you with My eye on you.” (Psalm 32:8)

Once we begin to trust God’s faithfulness and know that God is who He says He is, and that He will do what He says He will do, we begin to realize that He also has a very detailed and intimate interest in each of us.

Not only does God give us creation for us to enjoy, but He is also aware of every detail in our lives, and we can trust His faithfulness with details. He watches over us, teaches us, guides us, and cares for us as only He can.

Our lives are as important to Him as His creation, and we can trust in His faithfulness!

3. God is faithful to provide.
“He found him in a desert land and in the howling waste of a wilderness; He encircled him, He cared for him, He guarded him as the pupil of His eye. Like an eagle that stirs up its nest and hovers over its young, He spread His wings and caught them, He carried them on His pinions. The Lord alone guided him…” (Deuteronomy 32:10-11)

These verses refer to how God led Israel through the desert and provided for them.

Provisions are another example of how God always works on our behalf, even in ways we don’t realize!

He works in the visible and invisible world. He knows how fragile we are, and is aware that we can’t make it on our own. We are surrounded by His faithfulness, and we would not exist without Him.

Praise His holy name!

Pray this week:

Dear Father, I am so grateful for Your wonderful provisions. I thank You for placing me into Your creation with such thoughtfulness and kindness. Would You open my eyes to new examples of Your faithfulness? Would You make me know You in a deeper and more trusting way because I see how I am surrounded by Your faithfulness? Wherever I am, You are with me and faithfully provide what I need. Amen

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

Nokia CEO ended his speech saying this “we didn’t do anything wrong, but somehow, we lost”.

Nokia CEO ended his speech saying this “we didn’t do anything wrong, but somehow, we lost”.

 During the press conference to announce NOKIA being acquired by Microsoft, Nokia CEO ended his speech saying this “we didn’t do anything wrong, but somehow, we lost”. Upon saying that, all his management team, himself included, teared sadly.

Nokia has been a respectable company. They didn’t do anything wrong in their business, however, the world changed too fast. Their opponents were too powerful.

They missed out on learning, they missed out on changing, and thus they lost the opportunity at hand to make it big. Not only did they miss the opportunity to earn big money, they lost their chance of survival.

The message of this story is, if you don’t change, you shall be removed from the competition.

It’s not wrong if you don’t want to learn new things. However, if your thoughts and mindset cannot catch up with time, you will be eliminated.

Conclusion:
1. The advantage you have yesterday, will be replaced by the trends of tomorrow. You don’t have to do anything wrong, as long as your competitors catch the wave and do it RIGHT, you can lose out and fail.

To change and improve yourself is giving yourself a second chance. To be forced by others to change, is like being discarded.
Those who refuse to learn & improve, will definitely one day become redundant & not relevant to the industry. They will learn the lesson in a hard & expensive way.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

A woman is made in God’s image and her body is meant for His glory.

Do Not Commit Sexual Assault Or Harass Others
A woman is made in God’s image and her body is meant for His glory.

Written by Hope on 06/12/2016
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Sex, Sexual Assault, Sexual Harassment, Temptation, Self Control
Tell the young men to have self-control in everything.

Titus 2:6
A woman is made in God’s image. Her body is meant to bring Him glory, not to become a source of ungodly lust.

God is working His unique plan in her life. Your life as a Christian man should exhibit the “self-controlled” fruit of the Spirit (Galatians 5:23), not the immoral ways of the flesh (Galatians 5:19). Even if you see her walking alone, even if she is wearing something provocative, even if she is sexually forward with you, resist temptations to be immoral in thought or deed. God has promised that He “will show you how to escape from your temptations” (I Corinthians 10:13). And He asks that you “offer your bodies to him as a living sacrifice, pure and pleasing” (Romans 12:1).

God Commands Self-Control
In some societies, women are not permitted to leave their homes without a male relative. In others, women are blamed after being attacked by men, sometimes for wearing clothing that is ‘too provocative,’ or not trusted when they come forward with a story of sexual assault.

God’s Word says this is wrong! It is shameful for a man to brag about attacking or harassing women, and it is shameful to a community when such men go without facing consequences. Instead, God instructs His people repeatedly to behave with “self-control” (I Corinthians 7, I Timothy 3:2). Nowhere is it more difficult to have self-control than in the face of sexual temptation.

When Faced With Temptation To Torment
If you have the opportunity to take advantage of someone sexually, DON’T! Here are some ideas for avoiding temptation to commit sexual assault:

It is natural to recognise human beauty in a woman, and you can praise God for His work, without comment to the woman or to other men. Be truthful with yourself; if you feel lustful, acknowledge that sin before God and repent.
If you are often overcome with lust, discuss this with your pastor or another male friend who can help you move your focus to God.
When a woman is in public alone and it is appropriate to speak with her, limit yourself to a polite greeting. If you feel tempted to harass or sexually assault her, let God guide you to turn your attention elsewhere! If other men torment her, you can defend her, as appropriate; remember, “God’s Spirit doesn’t make cowards out of us. The Spirit gives us power, love, and self-control” (II Timothy 1:7), and “if you don’t do what you know is right, you have sinned” (James 4:17).
Simply put, treat every woman as respectfully you’d want a sister treated. Think of her as beloved by God: He has invested His image in her. His Son died for her sins, just as He did for yours. Your good behaviour will help “your light shine, so that others will see the good that you do and will praise your Father in heaven” (Matthew 5:16).
Maybe you know someone who has experienced sexual assault? Maybe you have been the victim yourself? It happens more often in some cultures than others. Be aware of the need to show grace to those who have been harmed and correction for those attitudes which allow abuse to continue.

Pray this week:

That God will embolden you to turn away from sexual temptation and to treat others respectfully.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

10 KEYS – WHAT DO YOU SEE ?

LIFE LESSONS FROM THE BOOK OF JOHN 8:38 

"I speak that which I have seen with my father : and ye do that which ye have seen with your father"

 

10 KEYS – WHAT DO YOU SEE ?

1.If you fail to speak what you see by faith , you will always fail to receive , what the lord has prepared for you by faith . 2 Cor 4:13 (NIV)"It is written: "I believed; therefore I have spoken." Since we have that same spirit of faith, we also believe and therefore speak,"

2.What you see becomes spiritual reality , when you speak it . Gen 1:2 (NIV) " And God said, "Let there be light," and there was light."

3.Never speak what the enemy is showing you .Prov 31:32."If thou hast done foolishly in lifting up thyself, or if thou hast thought evil, lay thine hand upon thy mouth." Is a trap.

4.Never believe the thoughts from the enemy. lest you begin to speak what he is showing you. Prov 4:23 (NIV)"Above all else, guard your heart, for everything you do flows from it."

5. The enemy will show you the facts, but God will always remind you of the truth .John 14:26 (NLT) "But when the Father sends the Advocate as my representative–that is, the Holy Spirit–he will teach you everything and will remind you of everything I have told you."

6.. In the Kingdom of God we are not ruled by our circumstances , but by what we see with the eyes of faith. Hab 2:4 "Behold, his soul which is lifted up is not upright in him: but the just shall live by his faith." We live by what we see with the eyes of faith !

7. What we see by faith , is as "real" as what we see in the physical .Matt 9:22 (ESV) "Jesus turned, and seeing her he said, “Take heart, daughter; your faith has made you well.” And instantly the woman was made well." Once you see it , it is yours!

8.What you see by faith has the power to change the fact into the truth. Luke 2:7 (NIV) "Jesus said to the servants, "Fill the jars with water"; so they filled them to the brim." Jesus never considered the fact , but worked with the truth.

9. What you see with the father is as real as the written word . John 1:1(NIV) "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God." No difference. period!

10. If you delight in what the Lord shows you , you would receive what he has prepared for you . Isaiah 64:4"For since the beginning of the world men have not heard, nor perceived by the ear, neither hath the eye seen, O God, beside thee, what he hath prepared for him that waiteth for him."

BONUSES:

11. When God shows you a thing , he expects only one thing in return "believe only " so you can receive it . Luke 8:50 "But when Jesus heard it, he answered him, saying, Fear not: believe only, and she shall be made whole."

12. If you celebrate what you see , God will celebrate you .If you fail to celebrate what you see , you limit God from celebrating you. Matt 14:31 (NLT) "Jesus immediately reached out and grabbed him. "You have so little faith," Jesus said. "Why did you doubt me?" Don't doubt what you have seen with the father !

 

Personal quote:

 

" What you see , is what God has done , you only receive it by faith , if you believe it"

Prayer: Father help me to believe what I see with you in Jesus name , Amen.

You are blessed!

tony buwawa in Life lessons, 

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e