Tag Archives: dream

Trials Allow Us to Comfort Others Why does God put His children through such terrible situations? Is there a purpose for our trials?

Why does God put His children through such terrible situations? Is there a purpose for our trials?

Written by Joy on 06/04/2014
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Family, Friends, Relationships, Trials
“God is our merciful Father and the source of all comfort. He comforts us in all our troubles so that we can comfort others.” 2 Corinthians 1:4

“Your baby has a hole in his diaphragm and no lungs, so he cannot breathe on his own without machines. Even with advanced medical treatment, he has only a 5% chance of survival.”

Those were the devastating words we heard when our son David was born. Why does God put His children through such terrible situations? Is there a purpose for our trials?

Life is Not Always Happy
Life does not always turn out the way you expect. After 8 months in the hospital and many surgeries, we approached David’s first Christmas with very little joy or hope. I watched David struggle to breathe, realizing how easy breathing was for me, and how I took it for granted. I was so tired of seeing my baby suffer. Then I “heard” a voice in my head say, “I know how you feel. I watched my Son suffer, too.”

God Understands Our Suffering
God sent his Son to suffer for me. Jesus’ suffering started at Christmas — his birth — when the God who created the universe confined himself to a human body. “Though he was God… he gave up his divine privileges; he took the humble position of a slave and was born as a human being” Philippians 2:6-7. How strange for Him to have to breathe, to feel hungry and uncomfortable, to depend on less-than-perfect parents to meet his every need. This world was a prison of limitations to His divine qualities. But he endured all this, and the pain of the cross, for you and me. “This High Priest (Jesus) of ours understands our weaknesses, for he faced all of the same testings we do, yet he did not sin.” Hebrews 4:15

God Promises to Be With Us
God never promises to take away suffering, but He does promise to always be with us. “Even when I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will not be afraid, for you are close beside me.” Psalm 23:4.

God was with me in that hospital room, and because of that experience I have been able to understand and comfort others in ways I never could have before. Your testimony of God’s strength and hope through difficult times can speak to people who might not otherwise listen. So when you experience trials….“Let us run with endurance the race God has set before us. We do this by keeping our eyes on Jesus….Who endured the cross because of the joy awaiting him.” Hebrews 12:1-2

Pray this week:

For your eyes to stay focused on your hope in Jesus Christ, no matter what the trial.

Have you suffered trials and hard circumstances in your life? I challenge you to share with others how God carried you through these times. When you do this, the Holy Spirit turns your ashes into something beautiful that brings God glory. Are you willing?

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Trump Plans Have Deal Makers Dreaming Big ($100-Billion-Cash-Takeover Big)

Bayer’s German headquarters. The company’s $66 billion offer for Monsanto last year is the record for an all-cash takeover bid. Credit Volker Hartmann/Getty Images

By MICHAEL J. de la MERCED APRIL 2, 2017

Bayer’s German headquarters. The company’s $66 billion offer for Monsanto last year is the record for an all-cash takeover bid. Credit Volker HartmanNEW ORLEANS — It wasn’t just cocktails on Bourbon Street or lucky breaks at the blackjack tables that contributed to the buoyant mood of the deal makers who gathered here last week. President Trump — and his support for lower taxes and lighter regulations — also had something to do with it.

At a gathering of the nation’s top mergers and acquisitions lawyers and bankers, the consensus was that under the Trump presidency, deal making should boom.

Lower taxes and less regulation, the thinking goes, should contribute to strong stock prices. And when the markets are up, companies are more likely to strike big deals. Finally, the pro-business Trump administration, most deal makers believe, is likely to take a forgiving view when it comes to antitrust matters.

Taken together, it was enough to lift the spirits of the lawyers, bankers and other advisers who attended Tulane University’s mergers conference last week.

Officially known as the Corporate Law Institute, the event is the year’s pre-eminent gathering of mergers advisers, a Davos for the deal maker set. For decades, top bankers and lawyers from Goldman Sachs; Cravath, Swaine & Moore; and other firms have come to the conference, in good times and in bad.

Lawyers who attend earn legal credits (several lawyers said they eagerly awaited a panel discussion on the arcane matter known as shareholder appraisal rights, a topic that makes nonlawyers’ eyes roll). But the real purpose of the event is to network, whether over butter-laden gulf fish at Galatoire’s or sherried turtle soup at Commander’s Palace or at the high-roller poker tables at Harrah’s.

This year’s gathering had more than 600 attendees, setting a record. And the general agreement throughout the crowd attending presentations at the stately Roosevelt Hotel was that the prospects for business were as good as ever. The sentiment was best captured when a senior banker from JPMorgan Chase made the bold claim that, under current market conditions, a company could strike a $100 billion takeover, paid entirely in cash.

Many deal makers had hoped this year would bring more business after a relatively slow 2016. A survey of 120 advisers by the Brunswick Group, a financial public relations firm, found that 44 percent of respondents believed that more mergers would be struck this year than last.

Mergers data for the first three months of the year appeared to at least partly support that. Some 10,229 transactions, worth $771.3 billion, were announced in the first quarter, according to Thomson Reuters. The dollar value was up 11 percent from the same time a year ago, although the number of deals was down about 11 percent.

Yet doubts were already emerging about whether Mr. Trump will really usher in a boom time for mergers, with the failure of the Republican health care overhaul and the president’s unpredictability threatening to dampen spirits.

Crossing Borders, Making Deals
Mergers worldwide grew 11 percent in the first three months of the year, compared with the period a year ago, as stock markets climbed. Leading the surge were cross-border transactions, which totaled $339.5 billion — the highest level since the first quarter of 2007.

The $100 Billion Deal

The tone for much of the conference was set as Kurt Simon, global chairman for mergers and acquisitions at JPMorgan, made his bold prediction that an enterprising corporate giant today could assemble an all-cash takeover bid of $100 billion.

It was an audacious claim — the record for an all-cash offer is Bayer’s $66 billion bid for Monsanto last year — but it illustrated how favorable the markets are for deal making.

Mr. Simon argued that the right company could borrow enough debt at low interest rates to cover the cash. Investors have largely supported corporate takeovers, pushing up the stocks of purchasers. And the Trump administration, which recently named a health care lobbyist as its choice for the Justice Department’s top merger reviewer, seems unlikely to block many deals.

Some attendees quietly joked that JPMorgan was simply angling for big lending fees. But none disputed the data underlying Mr. Simon’s claim. Interest rates remain low despite two raises by the Federal Reserve. Stock markets have been largely calm, devoid of whipsawing that would give buyers or sellers pause.

“The U.S. economy is in really good shape,” Mr. Simon said.

A Nod to Shareholder Activism

For years, many of the panelists at Tulane argued vigorously that activist hedge funds trying to shake up companies were short-term investors and did not have the best interests of other shareholders at heart.

Now, even the staunchest critics of these activist shareholders concede that the practice is here to stay.
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This conference was perhaps the first one in which an activist sat on stage with the chief executive of a company his firm had targeted. And each man sang the other’s praises.

Gerald L. Hassell, the chief executive of Bank of New York Mellon, spoke on a panel with Edward Garden, the chief investment officer of Trian Partners, an activist hedge fund that had targeted Bank of New York Mellon. The men discussed how they had cooperated in improving the bank’s financial performance, recounting dinners spent discussing strategy and joint efforts to provide financial benchmarks.

“I just want great outcomes,” Mr. Hassell said when asked who deserved praise for the bank’s turnaround. “It’s not an issue of who gets credit.”

And during another panel on activism, the entire group — advisers both to activists and to the companies those investors target — treated the practice as a permanent fixture on the corporate landscape.

Even Joele Frank, a financial publicist who has long advocated waging war on activists, has mellowed out on the topic.

“The biggest change I’ve seen in my practice is there is positive dialogue between the activist and the company for a settlement,” she told the group.

The Wisdom of Leo Strine

For lawyers in particular, one major draw of the conference is the chance to mingle with judges from Delaware, the corporate home for the vast majority of American companies.

And in particular, that means hearing from the most quotable of them all: Leo E. Strine Jr., the chief justice of Delaware’s Supreme Court.

Mr. Strine is widely regarded as one of the sharpest minds on the Delaware bench, and almost certainly its sharpest wit.

At the Roosevelt, he displayed the offbeat humor that laces his judicial opinions. He described one legally dubious situation as having a smell that was “not Bourbon Street when you’re having fun, but Bourbon Street the next morning.”

Not all was sunshine at the Tulane conference, whether with the mercurial New Orleans weather or with the outlook on transactions.

Panelists pointed to the rise of economic nationalism as a potential dampener on mergers. Both the Brunswick survey and Mr. Simon, of JPMorgan, cited a likely drop in offers for American companies by Chinese and Russian bidders.

Then there was the prospect that the Republicans’ failure to pass a replacement for Obama-era health care regulations made a sweeping tax law overhaul less likely. Some deal makers feared that the issues on which they most want to see reform — corporate tax rates and the taxation of sales made abroad and then brought back to the United States — could end up felled by political gridlock.

“Post-heath care, we have to consider a number of scenarios, one of which is that nothing happens,” said Eileen T. Nugent of the law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom.

And finally, there is Mr. Trump himself, and his brand of economic populism.

Merger proposals that would lead to big job cuts would be unlikely to go anywhere, George R. Bason Jr. of the law firm Davis Polk & Wardwell said, calling such layoffs “a tragedy for a lot of people.”

A version of this article appears in print on April 3, 2017, on Page B1 of the New York edition with the headline: Trump’s Plans Fuel Big Dreams by Deal Makers. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe

 

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Does Faith Help an Entrepreneur?

Being a devout Christian and being an entrepreneur aren't usually found in the same sentence. I've seen articles and heard people even say that the two don't go well together, saying one is progressive while one is degressive. However, in my opinion this couldn't be further from the truth.

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a huge believer in the saying, "manifest your dreams." I believe that if you have a deep passion for the work you are doing and become willing to do whatever it takes then you can accomplish just about anything. It may sound cliché, but this is the exact moment where I see God fit in many lives. 

You see, the biggest part of manifestation is truly when someone spends hours on a daily basis dreaming about what they plan on creating. When someone deeply envisions something they begin to grow a passion for it. Passion leads to hard work. Hard work leads to success. Christians who are empathetic, observant, and live to help others (as we were called to do and be) usually are easily able to pinpoint problems in society. These problems are where business ideas stem from, as the next step is finding a solution. I'm not saying these traits are only found in believers, I'm just saying that we have been taught these for the majority of our lives.

When I start a new project, no matter the size, I spend a quick moment talking to our Lord and Savior. I pray to him asking for a clear and creative mind, success in my endeavors, and the ability to do his work with my hands. I lift my project to him, and allow him to take over. Immediately after this I feel renewed, fresh, and as if I have a clear brain. This allows for my brainstorming to now take place.

Generally, when brainstorming, a lot of my ideas are risky. I can't tell you how many times my parents, family and friends have called me crazy and I definitely can't tell you how many times I was told by teachers and classmates that I screwed my self over by picking too hard of a topic. What I can tell you though, is that I do not regret any of those choices. "A man who does not leave his comfort zone never grows," is one of my favorite quotes. That mindset combined with the confidence that if I fail I will be saved and put back on the right track by God allows me to take risks without the constant worry of failure.

It has actually led me to believe that more Christians should be out there building new things.

Building on my former point, I believe there is nothing more important in life than worshiping the higher being who has given us this universe. I tend to view myself as someone who worships through my work and because of this I refused to do "useless topics" in class but rather picked some of the most challenging and controversial. I also refuse to live a stereotypical lifestyle because I believe I wasn't born a stereotypical person. I was made in the eyes of God, not the eyes of the institutions and government who continuously push me to go to college just to find a job with benefits (nothing wrong with either, just not my calling). Instead, I would rather go do something that can change the world we were given for the better. My faith is partially responsible for my passion for entrepreneurship because I feel like we as people all possess the ability to do something amazing and this is the canvas which I can excel at doing so with.

"With God, all things are possible." If you grew up in a conservative Christian household you've probably heard this near a million times at this point in your life. But hey, I can not think of a better way to end this article. With God it's very true that all things, within the morals and guidelines he has given us, are possible. I don't have much to add on to this statement besides my promise that this is true. I have witnessed his miracles many times, I have witnessed him turn dreams into reality, and I have witnessed him turn nightmares into fantasies. Give him your business or whatever you're working on, do his work through it, and in that moment you'll start to see success like never before. God promised to provide for you, and provide he will.

 

About the Author: Jeremiah Northcutt is a dreamer who is currently an enrolled Business Administration major at Gordon College. He has recently started a new company named Jueko Imports, LLC which has set out to help the Wildlife Conservation Society save the endangered animals of our planet by donating $50 for every 50 sales. Jeremiah has experience in E-Commerce, social media marketing, and sales. 

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Honda S Dream Streamliner Is Now Fastest Car Honda Ever Made

The Honda and its Honda S Dream Streamliner, which set a brand-new FIA world record for a vehicle in its Category-A Group-1 Class-4 by knocking a normal top speed of 261.875 mph over the flying mile at the Salt Flats. It also affixed a normal of 261.96 mph over the flying kilometer. The Dream Streamliner finished its content using a heavily altered model of the 660-cc three cylinder engine that was designed for the Honda S660. Using that 660-cc engine to set the world speed record remained company’s main objective said by Keisuke Tsuta in a press merchandise.

The record-setting run may have looked uncomplicated as the affixed moment of 261.865 mph over the flying mile was already faster than the 227.776 mph it set on the first day of the fight to end the FIA record. Getting there, though, were to be the strenuous part as the faction moved through every retreat and depression of the S660 engine and worked on its elements to get three times the power than the engine was able of making in capital form.

Several runs soon acted place, including some at the Bonneville Speed Week where the team was unable to come the speed it needed to end the record. Despite all of the contents that the team had in preparing the Dream Streamliner, the vehicle stood gangling when it was finally moment to strive the world record run, not only becoming the swift vehicle in its collection, but also becoming the swift vehicle Honda has ever created, brooding the room Honda F1 race vehicle that knocked a normal top speed of 246.9 mph over the flying mile at the Salt Flats in 2006.

Honda’s record-setting run is a large determination for the company as it reinforces the content within the Japanese manufacturer that it is able of enormous things if it collections its cognition to it. The action is especially more superb thinking all of the difficulties the team encountered along the path. There were issues with the engine, canopy design, with failed strive at Bonneville Speed Week.

All of these difficulties could’ve compelled Honda to elevate its guardianships and call off the whole situation. But it spent on and the phenomenons have certainly made it all worthy it for Honda. And for what it’s worthy, the accepted record normal top speed wasn’t the swift the faction earned during its run. The streamliner actually went fast on one of its advanced runs, coming a normal top speed of 266 mph. Unfortunately, that strive could not be accepted because the vehicle was not able to replicate the speed on its return run as demanded by FIA rules. Honda commodities have triumphed dozens of motorsports championships throughout the world, dominating tournament at heroic locations from Indianapolis to Monaco, and on surfaces being from the seashores of Dakar to the dust of Carlsbad.

But this ago week, a bold team of youthful Honda people acted to the Salt Flats of Bonneville, Utah to position the swift speed ever saved for a honda vehicle. Not only did the Honda position a brand-new FIA World Record of 261.875mph(1mile), 261.966mph(1km) for a vehicle in its collection (Category-a team-1 collection-4), it affixed a speed faster than any Honda-powered vehicle ever including the record opened by room Honda F1 vehicle at Bonneville in 2006, by using a 660cc engine three cylinder designed for the Honda S660 sports vehicle. The project Bonneville Speed Challenge was internally publicized at Honda R&D in Japan in 2015 and 16 associates were appointed from an excavation of 100 servicemen, including the project leader Keisuke Tsuta, to make the vehicle that would be known as the Honda S-Dream, to attain world speed record with 660cc engine.

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