This Is Officially the Best City in the World for Women Entrepreneurs

This Is Officially the Best City in the World for Women EntrepreneursThis Is Officially the Best City in the World for Women Entrepreneurs

When Aquila Leon-Soon was in the early stages of launching her startup, she was rejected for a loan by three different banks. She also knew that another funding option, venture capital, was not a realistic one: Black women like her only raise about .01% of the VC money pulled in by the average successful startup.

Luckily for Leon-Soon, she lives and works in New York City. Through resources provided by the city, she was able to find workarounds to replace the traditional avenues of funding, instead growing her business using government certifications, grants, and mentorship programs.

Happily, Leon-Soon's experience—she now runs her own consulting firm, Advance Talent Solutions—is not unique. —more any other U.S. city. In fact, Dell's new Women Entrepreneur Cities Index (WE Cities), released on Wednesday morning, ranks NYC as the world's best possible place to be a female entrepreneur. WE Cities measures a city's ability to attract and support high-potential female entrepreneurs—women who want to grow and scale their businesses. To create the ranking, research firm IHS partnered with Dell to come up with a scoring system and used it to rate 25 global cities. These cities were pre-screened for being generally entrepreneur-friendly based on previous Dell research, with the new WE Cities research providing an added gender lens.

"We wanted to find out why women-owned businesses scale better in one city than in another one," explains Elizabeth Gore, Dell's entrepreneur-in-residence.

The research team looked at 70 indicators that fell into five major categories—markets, talent, capital, culture, and technology—to come up with the scores for each city. Even the top places had "mediocre" scores: New York got a 58.6 out of a possible 100, the Bay Area was slightly lower with 58.3, and London got a mark of 50.4. "Even the best cities haven't cracked the code" for women entrepreneurs, says Gore.

Still, New York City is by far the highest scoring in terms of government policy, says Cris Turner, Dell's head of government affairs for the Americas. (The Bay Area, on the hand, is strongest in talent and technology.) "I really wasn’t surprised by the results given the amount of attention New York has placed on driving entrepreneurship," he says. That attention comes in three major forms: people, policies, and programs.

People

The city's digital director, its department of information telecommunication and technology commissioner, and its CTO are all women. Moreover, more than 70% of the 27 city agency commissioners are women. Having so many women in the city government "has been huge in changing the culture associated with women starting businesses," says Turner.

Policies

Since 2014, the mayor has launched a number of initiatives supporting female entrepreneurs. One example is a certification called Minority & Women-Owned Business Enterprises (MWBE), which gives special status to businesses owned by minority groups. Mayor Bill De Blasio's administration has made a commitment to award more than $16 billion to MWBEs over the next decade.

Programs

The list of city-based programs is long, but some of the biggest include Women Entrepreneurs NYC (WE NYC), which provides women entrepreneurs with free master classes, networking events, and mentors, and Tech Talent Pipeline, which attempts to reach the next generation through specialized training and internships for women in STEM fields.

Of course, the push to get more women to start businesses hasn't changed New York overnight, and the city that never sleeps continues to be a hotbed for male ambition. "At the end of the day, it's finance, construction, and those [industries] are still dominated by men," says Leon-Soon, who is both MWBE-certified and a member of WE NYC. Yet she remains optimistic that even that will change.

"We're doing something about it," she says. "The city's making moves."

“ The creation of a unique financial platform dedicated to the empowerment of women entrepreneurs and the people who invest in them . My team of young women is genuinely committed to growing our unique ecosystem of female entrepreneurs and driving meaningful change and innovation within their industries but also in their life "

Perfect the power of positive thinking, value love more and its power to change life . Chris Alexander .

Founder Brickell Capital Women Division – Crowd Funding Women Entrepreneurs. Funding Fashion and Social Influencers

Entrepreneurs
 Chris Alexander Chris Alexander

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Why Surfers Make Great Entrepreneurs

fb thumbnailWhy Surfers Make Great Entrepreneurs

1.It’s all about the Hustle

Surfing isn’t as mellow and laid back as those picture-perfect images of Malibu sunsets make it look. Out in the water can be a real hustle. Very often you’ve got to paddle out into a line-up of established and hostile faces and stake your claim for a right to be there. Sound familiar?

2.Think outside the box

As with business, it’s very often the people who don’t follow the crowd that reap the rewards in surfing. Those people who are prepared to take a chance and go a long way out of their way to search for new ways to rip the ocean waves are the pioneers. Guaranteed they’re surfing innovations are rewarding them extreme new surfing experiences as well as netting great wealth in the process.

3.Surfing teaches you failure

Like nothing else. (Except maybe business!) When you first start out you’re gonna try, try and try and fail, fail and fail. Cold water will rush through your sinuses. Your arms will feel like someone’s tried to rip them from your body. People will shout at you telling you to get out of their way. And yet, you can see those guys, just beyond the breakers, gliding along the face of the waves like they were raised by a pod of dolphins. Don’t let the failure hurt you. Get back on your board, stick with it, and you’ll get there. Once again – sound familiar?

4.Live on a shoestring

Surfers know how to exist with very little. They can make $100 dollars last longer than most people would imagine possible. They don’t go on holidays, they go on expeditions, and they want to stay away for as long as they possibly can. Two months on a remote Indonesian island eating nothing but rice and bananas? If the waves are good it’s all worth it. Surfers make sacrifices for their passion, just like the most successful startups.

5.See the bigger picture

When you’re starting a business, it’s so easy to let it become your world. Tunnel vision kicks in and you can’t think of anything except the next list of potential clients you’ve got to email or what a blogger said about you on Twitter. Here’s where surfers have an advantage. A little time spent in the ocean reminds you that there’s a much bigger world out there; that you’re just a tiny part of it. That kind of perspective can be helpful when you’re stressing about how many Facebook likes you got this week.

I was born an entrepreneur, but surfing entered my life when I first saw the ocean at the age of three. I was thunder struck and fell in love with that big blue ocean. Every real surfer I know is an entrepreneur. Unable and unwilling to hold a job down longer than the next swell.

Kawabunga, Markethive is my newest surf board to ride the coming quadrillion dollar swell. Are you with me?

Well? Are you?

Thomas Prendergast
Big Kahuena and CEO of Markethive.

P.S. Outside bruddas!

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