Schlagwort-Archive: Facebook

8 Content Marketing Tips to Help Your Business on Social Media.

Content Marketing:
Content marketing is on every business’s mind these days. As a business or brand we need to keep in mind what the community, or followers, or future buyers are looking for and their reactions to your content. Coming up with content is another post for another time. Here I want to discuss the Marketing and Strategy of your content.

Marketing your content is more than just posting, it is how your content is percieved. It is the little things that count that are not seen on the page, but have meaning.

So here are the basics:
Use your content to gently guide your followers through the buying cycle. Don’t treat it like a speed boat, full throttle from the beginning.

Use Social Media Ads to AMPLIFY the reach of your content. $5, $10, or even $20 can go along way.

The best marketing doesn’t feel like marketing. You can not force people to see the value in your content, services or products. If you are trying to force them, it will turn them off right away.

Use simple headlines. Titles that get to the point will bring higher quality people of interest to your content.

Re-Purpose old content in a new way. Take an old blog and turn it into a video or live stream, take an old video and turn it into a blog, edit a blog into 1 minute clips to put out on various networks. Be creative, there are many things to do.

Use a checklist for your content. List all the channels you want to use it for. Use a Social Media Calendar (get yours here) so you can manage your week with the content.

Look at your analytics of your old content. This gives you an idea of the most popular topics and types of content that are working. This will help with future content so you know what is working.

Always give them a way to contact you at the end. Whether it is Phone, Email, Social Media site, or Website.

I recently did a Facebook Live on this and included it here also.

http://https://www.facebook.com/rcstern/videos/10154604759773900/

I hope this was helpful for you and if you have any thoughts or questions please don’t hesitate to write in the comments below or reach out to me.

Robert C. Stern is the CEO and Founder of The Social Leader. Helping companies and individuals harness the power of Social Media for Business. Please Like us on our Facebook Page or follow us on Twitter.

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Facebook Pushes Outside Law Firms to Become More Diverse

A Facebook event in Berlin. The company is requiring that women and ethnic minorities account for at least 33 percent of law firm teams working on its matters. Credit Tobias Schwarz/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Like other Silicon Valley giants, Facebook has faced criticism over whether its work force and board are too white and too male. Last year, the social media behemoth started a new push on diversity in hiring and retention.

Now, it is extending its efforts into another corner: the outside lawyers who represent the company in legal matters.

Facebook is requiring that women and ethnic minorities account for at least 33 percent of law firm teams working on its matters.

Numbers alone, however, are not enough, under a policy that went in effect on Saturday. Law firms must also show that they “actively identify and create clear and measurable leadership opportunities for women and minorities” when they represent the company in litigation and other legal matters.

Those opportunities “include serving as relationship managers and representing Facebook in the courtroom,” Facebook’s general counsel, Colin Stretch, said in an interview. The legal department, he said, has for the last few years been working on increasing diversity at all levels.

“Firms typically do what their clients want,” he said. “And we want to see them win our cases and create opportunities for women and people of color. We think the firms are ready — our articulation gives not just permission but a mandate.”

For Facebook, the move on outside lawyers is happening even as the company’s efforts at improving diversity in its own work force have so far shown little progress.

According to statistics released last year, blacks and Hispanics last July accounted for only 3 percent each of senior leadership, and women made up an additional 27 percent. Hiring for the 12 months beginning with July 2015 showed something of an improvement: Of those newly recruited to senior leadership posts, 9 percent were black, 5 percent were Hispanic and 29 percent were women.

To improve those numbers, Facebook announced last year that it would focus on recruiting and retention. The company is also establishing programs to help underrepresented college students, as well as younger students in public schools nationwide, develop interests in coding and engineering. In addition, Facebook is reaching out to families who want to learn more about programming.

And when it comes to improving diversity among its outside lawyers, Facebook is part of a growing trend.

A number of general counsels across corporate America are pressing their outside firms to make their teams more diverse — in terms of ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and even disability — at all levels of seniority, not just among junior associates.

MetLife says it is announcing a new policy this month; HP in February adopted a more stringent program. The moves are an acknowledgment that the numbers of women and minorities at law firms have barely budged over the past 20 years.

“Law is the least diverse white-collar profession,” said Jean Lee, the chief executive of the Minority Corporate Counsel Association, an organization that focuses on the hiring, retention and promotion of diverse lawyers. “A lot of companies made a concerted effort to increase diversity internally, and now they are demanding diversity at the firms they use.”

“One of the challenges in the legal profession is that, despite all of the focus, the lack of diversity is a stubborn and persistent problem,” said Kim Rivera, HP’s general counsel. “We think we can help if we can be clear and unambiguous and hold firms financially accountable.”

HP now requires its outside law firms to have at least one diverse so-called relationship partner or at least one “woman and one racially/ethnically diverse attorney each performing at least 10 percent of the billable hours worked on HP matters.” (A woman who is also a minority will cover the requirements as long as she bills the requisite 10 percent.)
SEE SAMPLE PRIVACY POLICY
Failure to comply, under the policy, would result in a 10 percent “diversity holdback” of fees, but with a one-year grace period.

Ms. Rivera said the reaction to the new policy had been positive. “I’ve gotten dozens of calls and meeting requests largely asking how to partner with us to have the program succeed,” she said.

Zakiyyah Salim-Williams, the chief diversity officer for Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, which counts both HP and Facebook among its clients, said she was not fazed by the new requirements.

“We have a large number of diverse lawyers and we always try to staff our teams to reflect that,” she said.

Mr. Stretch of Facebook says its legal department will work with outside law firms in their efforts, tracking results, not surprisingly, through a variety of metrics.

It’s not just tech companies that are pushing their outside counsel. MetLife’s general counsel, Ricardo Anzaldua, will meet this month with representatives of some of the 50 firms the company retains to review an initiative to spur retention and sponsorship of women and diverse lawyers.

Under the program, the firms “must make sure that the junior diverse talent has sponsorship among the senior lawyers and that they get the best coaching and nurturing they can provide.” MetLife will evaluate the results in 2018; underperforming firms will have six months to improve or be dropped.

Mr. Anzaldua’s mandate echoes his own in-house initiatives. “A few years ago we began to identify and coach those with high potential to become the future leadership pipeline,” he said. “While the initiative doesn’t exclude white men, the proportion of women and people of color in that pipeline is more than 60 percent, reflecting the fact that we have an influx of talented women and people of color in the lower ranks.”
Some companies take a more fluid approach. While Verizon Communications has no numerical target, its general counsel, Craig Silliman, said, “diversity of the team is one of the specific criteria we use when we bid out a matter,” in addition to strategic approach, cost and other factors.

Morgan Stanley’s chief legal officer, Eric Grossman, in addition to encouraging diverse teams, also annually names one of its outside law firms as the recipient of a leadership award in diversity and inclusion. Firms vie for the award, which depend on a variety of factors.

“We put a lot of weight not just on the diverse and female attorneys who work on Morgan Stanley matters, but also on how many diverse lawyers they have in the firm and the depth of their sponsorship programs they have to promote overall diversity. We recognize that it just doesn’t happen on its own,” he said.

The possibility of a fee reduction or being dropped from the roster of approved firms could be an effective tool to make it happen.

“Companies are now using a carrot and stick approach because the carrot approach alone didn’t work,” said Ms. Lee of the Minority Corporate Counsel Association.

A version of this article appears in print on April 3, 2017, on Page B2 of the New York edition with the headline: Facebook Pushes Outside Law Firms on Diversity. Order Reprints| Today's Paper|Subscribe

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Oculus Founder, at Center of Legal Battle Over VR, Departs Facebook

Palmer Luckey, a founder of the Facebook-owned virtual-reality company Oculus, speaking with a reporter at a San Francisco conference in 2014. Credit Jason Henry for The New York Times

SAN FRANCISCO — Palmer Luckey, a founder of the virtual-reality technology company Oculus, has left Facebook three years after the social network acquired his company for close to $3 billion.

Mr. Luckey’s departure was announced two months after a trial in federal court over allegations that he and several colleagues had stolen trade secrets from a video-game publisher, ZeniMax Media, to create the Oculus technology. A jury found Facebook liable for $500 million in damages, in part for Mr. Luckey’s violation of a confidentiality agreement.

“Palmer will be dearly missed,” Tera Randall, an Oculus spokeswoman, said in a statement. “His inventive spirit helped kick-start the modern VR revolution and helped build an industry.”

Ms. Randall declined to disclose the terms of Mr. Luckey’s departure.

The move adds another twist to Facebook’s bumpy foray into virtual-reality technology. Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, has bet big on virtual reality as part of the social network’s future, saying he envisioned social interactions between people will someday exist inside virtual worlds. Oculus, he has said, could be a catalyst for that.

But from the start, Oculus has run into problems. Adoption of the Oculus technology and headsets has been slower than Facebook had anticipated. The selection of content made for VR headsets is still small, though growing.

“These things end up being more complex than you think upfront,” Mr. Zuckerberg said in January while appearing in court for the ZeniMax trial. “If anything, we may have to invest even more money to get to the goals we had than we had thought upfront.”

Mr. Zuckerberg has committed to spending more than $3 billion over the next decade to get virtual reality off the ground and into the mainstream.

Mr. Luckey has had other stumbles. In 2016, it became public that he had donated $10,000 to Nimble America, a pro-Trump political organization that promoted far-right memes and slogans on social media sites like Reddit, Twitter and Facebook. He has since apologized for the impact his actions had on Oculus and its partners.

Mr. Luckey did not immediately respond to a Facebook message requesting comment.

In January, Facebook appointed a new leader, Hugo Barra, to head up the company’s virtual-reality efforts, including Oculus.

Follow Mike Isaac on Twitter @MikeIsaac.

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Apple Just Put Another Nail In Snapchat’s Proverbial Coffin

Apple announced it will launch Clips in April, a video-making app that allows users to capture photos and videos, combine multiple videos and include a variety of features like Filters, Overlays, Posters and Live Titles.

We can draw many similarities between Clips and the already existing features of Snapchat, Instagram and Messenger. However, the key difference is that Clips is not attempting to build a stand-alone network. Instead, it acts as a production tool and encourages sharing across all existing platforms, including Facebook, Instagram and even Snapchat. Although the main emphasis is to encourage sharing via iMessage, the option of social network freedom is nevertheless there.

Until now, the mass-market video messaging features have been largely tied to the boundaries of their parent platforms. Users post Snaps on Snapchat, Stories on Instagram and Days on Messenger. To take part in advanced video messaging, users had to use at least one of these social networks, often multiple ones, as different social circles use different platforms. Users often tend to post content only on the one channel they find most relevant. With Clips, users can now make one Clip and share with their peers on Snapchat, their mother on Instagram and their grandfather on Facebook in one seamless session – or use iMessage to share it with their phone contacts. Apple encourages users to engage with the latter by deploying its face recognition technology that automatically suggests to share the clips with the people featured in the video.

Why Is Apple Doing This?

Apple rightly recognized that advanced video messaging features have grown so popular,that they have become a major product differentiator in the war of social networks. Apple has always been all about making consumers’ lives easier with user-friendly products. If mobile users have now evolved to expect a great photo/video messaging production experience as a standard, it is in Apple’s utmost interest to deliver it better than any non-Apple product can. Because of this, it is highly unlikely that we are going to see an Android version anytime soon (unless the uptake on iOS exceeds all expectations and a scalable opportunity emerges to drive potential new Apple users into the pipeline).

Apple is joining the trend of making video messaging features a part of its own product differentiation, but it does it in a completely different, competitive landscape. While most companies use video messaging features to differentiate their social media platforms, no other smartphone manufacturers do so at scale.

Implications

Besides creating a new product differentiator for iOS that will help drive further brand loyalty, Clips may disrupt both Snap Inc. and Facebook Inc.. If consumers start using Clips to produce photo and video messages at scale, all social networks risk a decrease in their average session lengths as a result. Even worse however, is their risk of loosing a portion of the high-value Apple users, who may simply choose to start sharing via the iMessage app. This in turn could threaten the value for advertisers and subsequently drive ad-inventory prices down.

This is much more of an existential threat for Snapchat than Facebook, because the former is amidst figuring out its business model and it does not have a solid foothold globally. After losing its product differentiation in the social messaging space, it will now face additional competitive pressures from the most valuable company in the world.
Karol Severin Karol Severin
Analyst • MIDiA Research

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Oculus could cost Facebook up to $11 billion, but it might be worth it

In 2014, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg spent $2 billion to purchase the virtual reality startup Oculus and its Rift headset. The deal was huge, not just from a price standpoint, but because it was proof of momentum behind the nascent VR industry.

Nearly three years later, though, it looks like that $2 billion was just a down payment for the VR company, as Facebook will likely have to shell out billions more until the social network can get the Oculus’ technology to a point where Zuckerberg and co. are satisfied.

The Facebook founder said as much while on the witness stand for a lawsuit that accuses Oculus of stealing some of its VR technology from video game company ZeniMax Media, according to The New York Times.

From $2 billion to $11 billion

That initial $2 billion payment for Oculus wasn’t even the entire amount Facebook paid for the company. The social networking giant also paid $700 million to keep certain Oculus employees and promised an additional $300 million if the company met specific milestones, according to the report.

On top of that, Zuckerberg said Facebook might have to dump an additional $3 billion into Oculus to shore up its technology.

Why commit to spending nearly $7 billion — plus an extra $2 billion if Oculus loses its lawsuit — on a technology that has yet to blow up in the consumer market? Well, because Zuckerberg is looking beyond VR in the traditional sense. See, where the Rift, HTC’s Vive and Sony’s PlayStation VR are primarily designed as gaming systems, the Facebook founder has his sights on making virtual reality a more social experience.

During the Oculus Connect 3 conference in October, Zuckerberg took the stage to show off a kind of virtual/augmented reality system the company was working on. In the demo Zuckerberg showed how he, through a digital avatar, could interact with friends and family in real time in a digital space as if they were all in the same room.

Price is still a barrier

It’s an interesting gambit, but it’s still far from complete. What’s more, the cost of VR systems like the Rift is still prohibitively high for many consumers. The company is working to bring prices down, though.

For instance, when Oculus launched the Rift in 2016, you needed to purchase a $1,000 to $1,500 PC to run the headset, plus another $600 for the device itself. Since then, the company has worked to ensure the Rift can run on systems that cost as little as $500. Still, at $1,100 for the whole setup, the Rift isn’t exactly cheap.

HTC’s Vive costs $800 and still requires a powerful PC, while Sony’s PSVR costs $400 and only works with that company’s PlayStation 4 console. Sure, gaming enthusiasts might not have a problem spending that kind of cash on a top-notch gaming experience, but none of these headsets is quite there yet. There’s no “killer app” for high-end VR systems.

The most successful headsets, so far at least, have been Samsung’s Gear VR, which costs $100 plus the price of a compatible Samsung smartphone, and Google’s Cardboard, which costs $15 in addition to the cost of a smartphone.

Zuckerberg’s big bet

Zuckerberg is obviously keenly aware of the importance of mobile platforms — the majority of Facebook’s traffic comes from mobile users and that will only continue to grow. Which is why Facebook split Oculus into two divisions, one primarily focused on PC-style VR and the other focused on mobile VR.

The hope is that Facebook and Oculus will be able to create a system impressive enough for all consumers to want to use. How long will it take for the company to get there? If Zuckerberg’s prediction on the stand holds up, it could take anywhere from 5 to 10 years.

Still, Oculus will be in an enviable position if Zuckerberg’s prognostications prove correct. That’s because the Facebook CEO sees gaming as just the tip of the VR iceberg. In its ultimate form, Zuckerberg sees virtual reality as a means to share experiences with others in real time and feel as though you’re actually there.

In a July interview with Bloomberg, Zuckerberg explained how virtual reality is the natural progression from sharing experiences via video, just as video was the natural progression of sharing experiences via photos. VR, then, will almost literally allow us to stand in another person’s shoes as they explore the world.

And with Facebook’s enormous audience — it has roughly 1.8 billion monthly active users, already sharing everything from selfies to wedding videos — the social network is just about the only company that can help push VR forward as a means to connect the masses. If that all works out, and Facebook becomes the VR company just as it is the social network, the billions Zuckerberg spent on Oculus will surely have been worth it.

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Skype now lets you make calls without an account

by ABHIMANYU GHOSHAL — 14 hours ago in MICROSOFT

 

Microsoft has updated Skype with a much-needed feature: A Web-based guest interface that lets you make and receive calls without the need to download the desktop app or register for an account.

To make a call, all you need to do is point your browser to skype.com and enter a handle. You’ll receive a link that you can share with anyone, and you can then start a voice or video call, group chat, and share files.

Naturally, your contact will be able to interact with you the same way when they visit the link you’ve shared, in an interface that will be familiar to anyone who’s used Skype in the past. Conversations last for 24 hours, after which they’re wiped clean.

skype-call
While that’s good to see on Skype, it’s clear that Microsoft is awfully late to the game. Barring email, most messaging apps that you might consider using to share this Skype call link already support voice and video calls.

If that still sounds useful to you, you can try the new feature by visiting skype.com.

Now anyone can use Skype right away on Skype Blog       http://tnw.to/2fbiLgl

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UK halts Facebook’s WhatsApp data dip

Facebook has been told it must not use data gathered from UK members of its WhatsApp messaging app to target ads on its core social network.

facebook and whatsapp data privacy

The country's Information Commissioner said she did not believe the firm had obtained valid consent for the move and added that people must be given "ongoing control" over their data.

Elizabeth Denham said that Facebook had agreed to "pause" its rollout but had not met all her demands.

Facebook has yet to publicly comment.

The California-based company bought WhatsApp in 2014 and pledged to keep the chat app independent.

However, in August, WhatsApp made changes to its privacy policy, prompting an investigation by the UK watchdog.

"I had concerns that consumers weren't being properly protected, and it's fair to say the enquiries my team have made haven't changed that view," blogged Elizabeth Denham, the Information Commissioner.

"I don't think WhatsApp has got valid consent from users to share the information.

"We've set out the law clearly to Facebook, and we're pleased that they've agreed to pause using data from UK WhatsApp users for advertisements or product improvement purposes."

Enforcement

Ms Denham said she now wanted Facebook and WhatsApp to:

  • offer customers' more details about how their data will be used
  • let WhatsApp members restrict access to their information beyond the existing 30-day cooling-off period
  • let users completely opt-out of the agreement at any time

Ms Denham said that Facebook had not agreed to these terms.

"If Facebook starts using the data without valid consent, they may face enforcement action from my office," she warned.

WhatsApp has already been cautioned warned by European privacy watchdogs about sharing user data with its new parent company. 

If you believe that my message is worth spreading, please use the share buttons if they show on this page.

Stephen Hodgkiss
Chief Engineer at MarketHive

markethive.com


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Verizon Bought Yahoo for $4.83 Billion…Time You Bought a Share in Markethive

Verizon Bought Yahoo for $4.83 Billion…Time You Bought a Share in Markethive

Image result for market network

“The entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it, and exploits it as an opportunity” ………Peter Drucker

Dollars make “Change” and this is why Verizon smelled the money and came a running resulting in the purchase of Yahoo for $4.83 billion dollars because Digital Advertising (Internet Advertising) generates billions of dollars for competing giants like Google and Facebook.  Nothing like owning a global Internet-Technology platform that swallows up its competition with large volumes of resources to continue the expansion into emerging global markets.  Yep, we see the emergence of a global oligarchy with corporations like Verizon, Facebook and Google, monopolizing online advertising and this is why we must act now to ensure our freedoms are not negotiated away by the pimps (corporations) and prostitutes (political leaders), who make the World’s Oldest Profession look positively saintly when comparing the gargantuan volumes of money exchanged that consummate today’s corporate business deals with government law makers (lol).  Nothing like having vigorous social intercourse between entities that essentially control the economy and the people.  Yes, Free Market Economics and Democracy at work and perfectly legal because, the lawmakers got their cut, I mean donation.

Anyway, back to Digital Advertising or Internet Advertising which is when “businesses leverage Internet technologies to deliver promotional advertising and messages delivered through emails blogs, video, banners, social media websites, social networks, market networks, affiliate programs, search engines and mobile devices”.  Indeed, multiple marketing methods with more eyeballs on products/services to maximize profits in a growing global market that reaches its audience in nanoseconds.  I guess, you can see why Verizon made its move and competitors (Facebook & Google) are about controlling and more importantly monetising content to the max.

So, dominance by these evolving Market-Networks (Facebook, Google & Verizon) continues and this is why you as an entrepreneur need to build your own Network by connecting with likeminded individuals and Social Networks like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Reddit and countless others that influenced the way we communicate and interact act with each other. 

So, ready to start the process and purchase a share in a growing Market-Network known as Markethive that gives you an unfair advantage as an entrepreneur?  

The Alpha Legacy Special includes the following, full profile page activation (turns subscribers into your customers), receive 200,000 ad credits every month (that can be used at any time), receive 3,000,000 ad credits deposited into your account (that can be used at any time), receive 50% commission for every sale of advertising, every paid Alpha signup that you personally introduce to Markethive (your children). This means your initial contribution will be recovered quickly in our affiliate program and you will always receive far more advertising benefits as well with this program.

 

5% Revenue Sharing: As an Alpha Legacy, Alpha Lite, Alpha Founder (all now known as Alpha Legacy) as revenue increases each member will receive 1 share per Alpha Legacy account of 5% of the Markethive revenue. No need for contracts as this has now become all inclusive.

Purchase as many as you want. But keep in mind this is a limited offer.

Alpha Legacy is limited to 250 subscriptions which is dwindling fast. The one-time price for this Alpha Legacy Special lifetime partnership has been slashed to $400. (It originally sold for $1200 over a year ago.)

This is our final push to take Markethive across the starting line. We will hold many meetings to help you understand why this could be the best decision of your life. Do you believe Markethive will be the next great social network? We do!

LinkedIn revenue and sales: 2015 ($2.9 billion).

If, you watched Rise of the Entrepreneur then, you would recognize that this company embraces change and adapts to the reality of the conditions of its customers so as to achieve a solution.  Ironically, many companies are resistant to making adjustments to satisfy their customers base.        

Contributor

Vaurn James

 

 

 

 

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What Does Advertising-Supported Revenue Model Mean?


What Does The Future of  the Ad-Supported
Revenue Model Mean to the Internet and Technology?

An advertising-supported revenue model is a business approach that emphasizes the sale of advertising as a major source of revenue. This structure is most prominent in traditional broadcast and print media, as well as online media. Media businesses generally earn revenue from advertising, customer subscriptions or a combination of the two.

Traditional Media

TV and radio shows, along with newspapers and magazines, generally serve to entertain or inform viewers or readers. TV and radio have traditionally been largely advertising-supported. While networks and TV stations do often earn revenue through subscriptions to satellite or cable television, much of their income is earned from advertisers trying to appeal to viewers. Similarly, magazines and newspapers charge subscription or purchase fees, but advertisers pay to place ads within these print media.

E-Commerce

The emergence of the Internet in the mid-1990s has affected the advertising-supported revenue model. Newspapers, for instance, have tried to adjust to increased demand for online content and limited growth in print publications. Thousands of media websites have been born online, which often offer free access to content for users. This attracts users and enables the publishes to sell banner ads and advertorial ad spaces. Traditional newspapers have offered free content as well, but many are trying to figure out how to combine ad revenue with subscription fees as of 2013.

Benefits

The benefit of an advertising-supported revenue model is that if you have an audience, you can almost always find companies that want to pay to reach it. This is especially true when you can provide specific details about the nature of your audience. When you operate with a 100 percent ad-supported model, you can more easily attract users with free content. Newspapers have long given away hundreds of copies to businesses and organizations in communities to drive up their circulation and readership, and subsequently, ad revenue potential.

Drawbacks

The major drawback of an entirely ad-supported revenue model is the inherent lack of diversification. Businesses generally prefer multiple revenue streams when possible. In a down economy, advertisers might back off their investments, which can more negatively affect a medium that has no subscription revenue. Plus, print publications, and even some websites, have high costs. Even a small subscription rate can help cover some of these costs. Local newspapers charging, say, 35 cents per issue can't use that to cover all production costs, but the fees do help offset costs and allow revenue to build.

Facebook Reports Soaring Revenue, Buoyed by Mobile Ads

On Wednesday, Mr. Zuckerberg’s social-networking company, Facebook, reported another quarter of soaring revenue. The company said sales in the fourth quarter rose 52 percent from a year ago, to $5.84 billion, while profit increased to $1.56 billion, more than doubling from $701 million a year ago. For the full year, the company reported $3.69 billion in profit on $17.93 billion in revenue, an increase of 44 percent from 2014.

The numbers far surpassed Wall Street’s fourth-quarter expectations of $1.2 billion in profit on $5.37 billion in revenue. Investors welcomed the performance by pushing up Facebook’s stock more than 12 percent in after-hours trading.

The results were largely a result of Facebook’s enormous success in selling advertising on mobile devices, a business that the company was not even in just a few years ago. Mobile ads made up 80 percent of the company’s total ad business in the fourth quarter, compared with 23 percent in the same quarter of 2012.

“We have a Super Bowl on mobile in the U.S. every single day,” Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook, said in an interview.

The results offer a bright spot in a tumultuous climate for many American technology stocks. Shares of Twitter, Facebook’s most visible social networking competitor in the United States, have tumbled more than 55 percent during the last year. Yelp, the local-review service, is down about 60 percent. LinkedIn, the professional social networking service, is off more than 15 percent.

Facebook is a much larger company than many of its peers, yet it is able to keep its growth rate high. The company has notched double-digit jumps in ad revenue and in the expansion of its user base. Facebook now has 1.59 billion monthly visitors, up 14 percent from a year ago. About 1.44 billion of those people visit the site on a mobile device; 1.04 billion visit Facebook every day.

That growth engine has given Facebook lots of room to play in different areas — like virtual reality, messaging and even building drones capable of delivering Internet service to far-flung places around the world — that seem to have little to do with Facebook’s core business of advertising.

Facebook is spending billions of dollars developing those projects, and Mr. Zuckerberg has repeatedly said the company has no plans to make money on them in the near term. In an earnings call with investors, David Wehner, Facebook’s chief financial officer, said the company projected that expenses would increase roughly 30 to 40 percent over the course of 2016 compared with last year.

One example of the spending is on Oculus, Facebook’s $2 billion bet on bringing virtual reality to the mainstream. The unit will begin selling its first headsets to consumers in March. Facebook has said it plans to sell the hardware, called the Rift, at a loss to help the technology catch on with a large audience.

“These are long-term bets, but we don’t think they’re particularly large bets relative to the size of Facebook,” said Ben Schachter, an Internet analyst at Macquarie Securities. “They’ve gone out of their way to say they’re not Google and going after health care, for instance.”

Other analysts said they also saw potential for profit in the hundreds of millions of people who regularly use Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp, a messaging service also owned by Facebook.

They are also bullish on the potential for Instagram, the photo-sharing service that has more than 400 million regular monthly users, to become a significant source of revenue in the future. The company does not disclose what portion of revenue Instagram accounts for in Facebook’s overall sales. Ms. Sandberg said 98 of the top 100 advertisers on Facebook also advertised on Instagram in the last quarter.

As for Mr. Zuckerberg, he spent a portion of the investor call on Wednesday talking about his new role as a father to his daughter, Max.

“With a new addition to my family, I’ve been reflecting a lot on the legacy we want to pass on to the next generation,” he said, adding that he wanted Facebook to “continue to focus on solving the fundamental challenges facing the world, and bringing the world closer together.”

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Facebook worth $1 trillion? Not so crazy

These are all legitimate concerns for investors … and hot topics of discussion on Facebook. So maybe that's why Facebook is doing so well. There's a lot to talk about.

Facebook (FBTech30) shares hit an all-time high on Wednesday. The company is now worth about $350 billion. Cue Justin Timberlake as Sean Parker telling Mark Zuckerberg in a sequel to "The Social Network" that a trillion dollar market valuation is cool?

Actually, it's not out of the question that Facebook could someday be worth $1 trillion.

It won't happen overnight, of course. But Facebook shares are up more than 200% from their 2012 initial offering price of $38.

There's a lot to like about Facebook. The company recently announced that its Messenger platform crossed the 1 billion monthly active user mark, joining the core Facebook service, WhatsApp and Groups at this nine zeroes milestone.

Instagram is — to quote Bon Jovi — halfway there (but not livin' on a prayer.) The popular photo sharing site has 500 million monthly active users.

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Related: Messenger hits 1 billion monthly users

There are also high hopes for Facebook's new Facebook Live streaming service (CNN is a partner) and virtual reality subsidiary Oculus. It will be interesting to see if Facebook/Oculus tries to do more in augmented reality given the success of Pokemon Go.

But enough about Facebook's future. The present looks pretty good, too.

Facebook will report its second quarter earnings on July 27 and analysts are predicting another quarter of blockbuster growth. Wall Street is expecting a nearly 50% jump in sales from a year ago and a more than 60% increase in earnings per share.

Related: Messaging app Line soars in biggest tech IPO of the year

To get to a trillion dollar valuation, Facebook would have to go up another 185% — putting its stock price at about $345. It is currently trading at about $121.

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For what it's worth, Wall Street's consensus price target for the next twelve months is $144. That's about 20% higher than current levels and would place a $420 billion value on the company.

Another thing in Facebook's favor? The stock doesn't have a crazy valuation like many tech giants did in 1999 and early 2000. It's trading at 26 times earnings estimates for next year.

Sure, that's not cheap. But it may be reasonable given its earnings growth potential — and it's a much better bargain than Amazon, which trades at 75 times profit forecasts. It's also not that much more expensive than Google owner Alphabet and Microsoft.

Facebook is now worth about as much as Amazon(AMZNTech30). The two tech giants trail only Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway (BRKA), Exxon Mobil (XOM),Microsoft (MSFTTech30), Alphabet (GOOGLTech30)and Apple (AAPLTech30).

Who do you think will get to $1 trillion first? I've got a poll up on Twitter (which probably won't get close to $100 billion, let alone $1 trillion, anytime soon) asking you to choose between Apple, Alphabet, Facebook and Amazon.

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