Tag Archives: five

Never Trust A Manager Who Does These Five Things

Every working person knows that your direct supervisor sets the tone for your relationship with your job.

If your supervisor is cool, it could be a great job for you even if it isn’t your dream job.

If your supervisor is a jerk, it won’t matter how much you like the work on your desk — you’re probably going to hate the job, anyway.

Your manager is the person who can give you pay raises or keep you stuck at your current pay rate. Your manager can fire you or recommend you for a promotion.

The power your manager holds over you, your employment security and your career path makes your direct boss the most important person in your working life for as long as you have your job.

The unequal power relationship between a manager and their subordinate is one of the most dysfunctional features of traditional employment.

It is ridiculous that new supervisors are promoted with little thought, given little to no training and then put in charge of other people, but it happens every day.

It is not  healthy for you to need one person — your manager —  to approve of your every move!

Working people can easily begin to shift their words and actions in order to please (or try to please) their boss — and hurt  themselves in the process.

A person who feels a lot of pressure to keep a difficult boss happy may not even be aware of the degree to which they bend themselves into pretzel shapes to accommodate their manager.

This is a very bad thing to do – but most of us have done it!

Pay attention the  next time you’re having lunch or coffee with your friend and your friend gets a phone call from their boss. The minute your friend starts talking to their boss, their voice changes.

We unconsciously shift our behaviors to match what we think our boss wants to see and hear from us. In the process we give up something very valuable — namely control over our own minds and bodies!

I hope you have a manager who trusts you and whom you can trust. You deserve to work for a manager who doesn’t expect or require you to behave any differently at work than you do anywhere else.

You deserve to work for someone who wants to see the real you at work, not a fake, subservient version of you — but many of us are not that lucky.
One of the biggest problems in the working world is the level of fear in many workplaces.  Employees skulk around trying to stay out of trouble rather than having fun solving thorny problems with other smart people.

That is the way work should be — creative, warm and human! Sadly, it is easier to find fear-based workplaces than healthy, trust-based ones.

If you can’t trust your manager, you can’t grow your flame. You can’t speak with your own voice, for fear that your boss won’t like it.

If you are in that situation, it’s time to start thinking about your next career move.

If you aren’t sure whether or not your manager is trustworthy, here are five unmistakable signs they aren’t.

If your manager complains to you about your fellow employees or higher-up managers, they are not trustworthy. Anyone who will gossip to you will just as easily gossip about you.
If your manager is obsessed with “face time” in the workplace and pays close attention to employees’ arrival and departure times, they are not trustworthy. A manager for whom “face time”  is more important than actual results is a manager mired in fear, and a person in fear cannot be trusted because their fear will make them do things that a confident person would never do — like throw employees under the bus to save themselves.
If your manager is afraid of higher-up managers, they are not trustworthy. My friend Laura worked for a manager like that. Laura’s manager Denise told her “I’m your biggest supporter, Laura. You let me know what you need, and I’ll go the division VP and get it.” That sounded great, but Laura didn’t believe Denise. Laura said “Denise says all the right things but when she’s under pressure, she becomes a different person. She would stab me in the back in a heartbeat to avoid looking bad with the VP — and I know that because she’s done it before!”
If your manager needs to find someone to blame whenever something goes wrong, they are not worthy of your trust. Many managers have this problem. They cannot handle the pressure of being accountable for their department. When something goes wrong, they must find a scapegoat. They yell at the scapegoat or write them up to get rid of the stress they feel over the mishap. No matter how friendly your manager is when he or she is not experiencing stress, you cannot assume that you can trust them when their stress level increases!

If your boss is obsessed with targets and metrics, you cannot trust them. Yardsticks are only one part of a healthy management structure. Managers who care too much about hitting every goal, every day do not have the backbone to lead through trust. That is the only kind of manager worthy of your talents!
If you cannot trust your manager, don’t panic. You don’t have to start a job search tomorrow, but you can begin to think about what you want and need in a job that you aren’t getting now. You can take your time, and launch a stealth job search when you feel ready.

Your muscles will begin growing the moment you turn your attention away from pleasing your undeserving boss and start focusing on pleasing yourself!
Liz Ryan is CEO/founderofHuman Workplace and author ofReinvention Roadmap. Follow her on Twitterand read Forbescolumns.

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Business Mistakes Learned the Hard Way: 5 Entrepreneurs Share their Story

Where are you in your entrepreneurial pursuits? Idea stage? Development stage? Growth Stage? Whatever stage that may be, there is excitement and uncertainty. Many of us know to seek out mentors, business coaches, and peers about their experiences and insights. For good reason too: learn from them. Listen to their advice. Take their words of wisdom and apply it to your own situation. Yet, regardless of where we are in the process, we will encounter obstacles and problems. We KNOW we will make mistakes; we KNOW there will be failure, but we fight to minimize the depth of failure. However, there are situations that pop up without warning or they creep up on us to create havoc. These 5 entrepreneurs share their story and lessons learned:

Jennifer Tamborski, Virtual Admin Experts: “Hiring people and being a leader is entirely different from the corporate world. I hired employees and set them loose, assuming they knew what I knew. When they came back to me confused and lost, I realized I didn’t have the processes necessary for my employees to effectively perform their job. It’s a process I had to learn as I taught them.”

Lesson learned: a clear, concise, communication and documentation plan must be established. Follow-up with employees is just as important as follow-up with clients.

Chris MacLellan, Whole Care Network: “My theological background inspired me to trust without hesitation. That approach to life did not transfer well to business. I didn’t discover this until I handed over the IP (intellectual property) to a business connection in which the gesture was not reciprocated. As a result, I lost lots of money and my humility. It took a great deal of time to restructure my business, much of which conflicted with my trusting nature.”

Lesson learned: Life skills do not always transfer well to business skills.

Mary Scott, Make Believe TV: “Create a clear, contractual arrangement for each project which includes payment agreements and pricing for situations that influence the service offered. All decisions must be clear and understood before the project (or any part of the business arrangement) begins. If it isn’t clear, it will cost a lot of time, money, and frustration.

Lesson learned: Do not rush into a project without the proper documentation.

Angie Monko, Harmony Harbor Coaching: “I jumped into business without a clear plan, quickly becoming distracted by multiple business objectives. I didn’t recognize the situation until ~18 months later when cash flow and momentum declined. It took another 18 months to create a business plan and to begin recovery.”

Lesson learned: Create a business plan, follow it, and revise as your business shifts and grows.

Paul Heirendt, True Bearing Advisors: During my corporate days, I had ‘two young guys’ working with me. They frequently joked, ‘You’re not the boss of me’, which resulted in them learning very little and becoming a liability rather than an asset. I eventually left the corporate world and took one of these young guys with me. As his urging, we moved into his uncle’s free office space in downtown St. Louis. The caveat: the uncle’s son must become the CEO of my company. With no written partnership and nearly 100% of the company in my name, I dealt with legal issues, lost opportunities, lost revenue, and lots of bad blood.”

Lesson learned: It’s better off not partnering unless each member can prove their value AND share the same business goals.

These entrepreneurs faced some crushing blows to their business growth but regrouped, adjusted and recovered. Communication and documentation were the top business issues. How can you apply their lessons? Share your ideas or stories below.

Kristen Edens

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The Best Days and Times to Post on Five Major Social Networks

by Ayaz Nanji  |  October 17, 2016  |  1,190 

The most effective days and times for brands to post on social media vary significantly by network, according to recent data from TrackMaven.

Its report was based an analysis of 17.5 million social media posts made by 17,737 brands on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Brand posts made to Instagram garner the most engagement (likes, comments, etc.) at 7 PM EST, on average, and on Fridays, the analysis found.

Brands' Pinterest pins also perform best on Fridays, though they register the highest engagement levels around 1 AM EST.In contrast, brand LinkedIn posts perform best at 9 AM EST and on Wednesdays. Brands' Twitter posts and Facebook posts both garner the most engagement on Thursdays.

 

The best days and times to post to social media also varies significantly by industry, the analysis found.

For example, the most effective day and time for aviation brands to tweet is at 1 PM EST, and on Fridays, whereas for marketing and advertising firms it is 4 PM EST and on Thursdays.

To see industry-specific data for 75 verticals, check out the full report.

About the research: The report was based an analysis of 17.5 million social media posts made by 17,737 brands on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest.

 

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