Schlagwort-Archive: found

Ex-Boyfriend Stabs Her 32 Times. 3 Years Later, The EMT Who Found Her Dying Hands Her A Note

In 2012, Melissa Dohme was 20 years old when she was attacked by her ex-boyfriend in Clearwater, FL. He stabbed her 32 times and left her for dead. Miraculously, she survived.

Firefighter-paramedic, Cameron Hill, was one of the first responders at the scene of the crime. One day, in the midst of her long road to recovery, Melissa attended a church event and finally met Cameron.

Melissa and Cameron instantly connected, and soon they were in love.

Melissa underwent several surgeries to reconstruct her face and body. Wait until you see her transformation! She continues to document her journey via Facebook, constantly showing her appreciate for her strong support network of family, friends, her loyal pit bull, and now the love of her life. All the while, Melissa has become an advocate against domestic violence; she’s graduated from college; she’s become a nurse; and her story of survival has inspired millions.

A judge sentenced Robert Lee Burton Jr. to life in prison. After the sentencing, Melissa proved her strength yet again. “I offer forgiveness and I forgive him,” she said. “Forgiveness is a sign of letting go and when you forgive someone that hurts you, you take away their power.”

Three years after her brush with death, Melissa threw the ‪ceremonial first pitch at a Tampa Bay Rays game. Little did she know, Cameron had a huge surprise for her.

This is Melissa Dohme. When she was 20 years old, her ex-boyfriend tried to kill her. He stabbed her 32 times, all over her body, and left her for dead.

But Melissa fought for her life, and miraculously, she survived. She suffered critical stab wounds to her face and neck, leaving her partially paralyzed in her face. The attempted killer was sentenced to life in prison, and Melissa began documenting her road to recovery on Facebook.

Melissa's best friend Kayla stood by her side, from the trauma room to her first courtroom appearance. You can see the incredible transformation Melissa began to make in recovery.

Melissa underwent several surgeries to repair the damage that had been done, like scar excision and revision surgery. She had deep cuts, missing teeth, an eye that didn't shut — but she never gave up hope.

Included in Melissa's vast network of supporters and loved ones is Dixie, her faithful pit bull. Dogs have incredible healing power!

One day, in the midst of her long road to recovery, Melissa attended a church event and finally met Cameron (pictured on right) — one of the firefighter-paramedics who saved her life that tragic day. The two instantly bonded, and sparks flew…

…And by 2013, Melissa and Cameron were totally in love! Melissa says she's not bitter about the attack because it led to her meeting the love of her life. 

As Melissa began piecing her life back together, she became a huge advocate in her community against domestic violence. Break the Silence Against Domestic Violence is just one of her many causes, and victims of domestic violence look to her for hope and strength.
As Melissa began piecing her life back together, she became a huge advocate in her community against domestic violence. Break the Silence Against Domestic Violence is just one of her many causes, and victims of domestic violence look to her for hope and strength.

Robert Lee Burton Jr. pleaded guilty to attempted first-degree murder. Judge Keith Meyer sentenced him to life in prison without parole. He was 22 at the time of the crime.

On May 11, 2015, Melissa threw the‬ ceremonial first pitch at the Tampa Bay Rays baseball game for her community work opposing domestic violence. She had no idea Cameron was there with a huge surprise…

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Does Faith Help an Entrepreneur?

Being a devout Christian and being an entrepreneur aren't usually found in the same sentence. I've seen articles and heard people even say that the two don't go well together, saying one is progressive while one is degressive. However, in my opinion this couldn't be further from the truth.

Anyone who knows me knows that I am a huge believer in the saying, "manifest your dreams." I believe that if you have a deep passion for the work you are doing and become willing to do whatever it takes then you can accomplish just about anything. It may sound cliché, but this is the exact moment where I see God fit in many lives. 

You see, the biggest part of manifestation is truly when someone spends hours on a daily basis dreaming about what they plan on creating. When someone deeply envisions something they begin to grow a passion for it. Passion leads to hard work. Hard work leads to success. Christians who are empathetic, observant, and live to help others (as we were called to do and be) usually are easily able to pinpoint problems in society. These problems are where business ideas stem from, as the next step is finding a solution. I'm not saying these traits are only found in believers, I'm just saying that we have been taught these for the majority of our lives.

When I start a new project, no matter the size, I spend a quick moment talking to our Lord and Savior. I pray to him asking for a clear and creative mind, success in my endeavors, and the ability to do his work with my hands. I lift my project to him, and allow him to take over. Immediately after this I feel renewed, fresh, and as if I have a clear brain. This allows for my brainstorming to now take place.

Generally, when brainstorming, a lot of my ideas are risky. I can't tell you how many times my parents, family and friends have called me crazy and I definitely can't tell you how many times I was told by teachers and classmates that I screwed my self over by picking too hard of a topic. What I can tell you though, is that I do not regret any of those choices. "A man who does not leave his comfort zone never grows," is one of my favorite quotes. That mindset combined with the confidence that if I fail I will be saved and put back on the right track by God allows me to take risks without the constant worry of failure.

It has actually led me to believe that more Christians should be out there building new things.

Building on my former point, I believe there is nothing more important in life than worshiping the higher being who has given us this universe. I tend to view myself as someone who worships through my work and because of this I refused to do "useless topics" in class but rather picked some of the most challenging and controversial. I also refuse to live a stereotypical lifestyle because I believe I wasn't born a stereotypical person. I was made in the eyes of God, not the eyes of the institutions and government who continuously push me to go to college just to find a job with benefits (nothing wrong with either, just not my calling). Instead, I would rather go do something that can change the world we were given for the better. My faith is partially responsible for my passion for entrepreneurship because I feel like we as people all possess the ability to do something amazing and this is the canvas which I can excel at doing so with.

"With God, all things are possible." If you grew up in a conservative Christian household you've probably heard this near a million times at this point in your life. But hey, I can not think of a better way to end this article. With God it's very true that all things, within the morals and guidelines he has given us, are possible. I don't have much to add on to this statement besides my promise that this is true. I have witnessed his miracles many times, I have witnessed him turn dreams into reality, and I have witnessed him turn nightmares into fantasies. Give him your business or whatever you're working on, do his work through it, and in that moment you'll start to see success like never before. God promised to provide for you, and provide he will.

 

About the Author: Jeremiah Northcutt is a dreamer who is currently an enrolled Business Administration major at Gordon College. He has recently started a new company named Jueko Imports, LLC which has set out to help the Wildlife Conservation Society save the endangered animals of our planet by donating $50 for every 50 sales. Jeremiah has experience in E-Commerce, social media marketing, and sales. 

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These 10 Leadership Habits Have Been Found in the World’s Best Leaders

Where are you in your own journey as a leader in relation to these characteristics?
  
     By Marcel Schwantes 
Principal and founder, Leadership From the Core@MarcelSchwantes

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CREDIT: Getty Images
  
If you're not familiar with the leadership movement known as servant leadership, you might want to grab a cup of java and pull up a chair. This may just transform how you lead your tribe moving forward.

What we are finding is that organizations around the world are changing their attitudes toward leadership. Yes, it's been written and talked about for decades, with great authors defining it in different ways, calling it different things.

In the end, most of these "thought leaders" have been talking about the same things–that leadership (and life, really) is about human relationships.

Consequently, servant leadership has emerged over the last 30 years on a grand scale in some of the most admired and successful companies on the planet, including many named to Fortune Magazine's annual listing of "The 100 Best Companies to Work For." Companies like Zappos, The Container Store, and Southwest Airlines have successfully integrated servant leadership into their corporate cultures.

To immortalize the movement, world-renowned management thinker Danah Zohar, in her groundbreaking book Rewiring the Corporate Brain, called servant leadership "the essence of quantum thinking and quantum leadership."

Giving Credit Where Credit Is Due
Before I give you the 10 practices of a servant-leader (or, if you can't wait, scroll down to "The Gold Mine" for the good stuff), I need to frame this article into its proper context and give credit to the right people.

Robert K. Greenleaf is the first person that needs distinct accolades as the founder of the modern servant leadership movement. Without his work and research, I don't have a basis for my work or speaking engagements.

As his bio states, Greenleaf's work continues to have a lasting impact on fields as diverse as systems thinking, management, leadership, organizational development, religion, assessment and evaluation, and scores of other disciplines.

Legendary management consultant Peter Drucker, Greenleaf's good friend and collaborator for over a decade, called him "the wisest man I ever met."

But there's another person worth noting in this conversation.

Meet Larry Spears
Allow me to introduce you to Larry Spears. He is deserving of his own bust on the Mt. Rushmore of servant leadership for advancing the movement after Greenleaf passed in 1990.

Spears, a prolific author and editor, has been called today's foremost authority on servant leadership. Through his writings, millions have been introduced to servant leadership. It didn't hurt having Stone Phillips interview him on NBC's Dateline in front of ten million viewers back in 2004.

After Greenleaf's death, Spears spent years combing over a truck-load of Greenleaf's personal papers and discovered previously unknown and unpublished essays written by Greenleaf over a fifty-year period.

This…was…a gold mine.

Chief Human Resource Officers take note. In his analysis, Spears was able to identify the ten characteristics of the servant-leader as being of critical importance to transforming an organization.

While by no means exhaustive, Spears says "they do serve to communicate the power and promise that this concept offers to those who are open to its invitation and challenge."

The Gold Mine
As I go over these, I want you to consider where you may be in your own journey as a leader in relation to these characteristics. Call this you new measure for leadership success.

1. Listening
Listening lands first on this list because it is a crucial yet frequently absent trait in leaders who are self-oriented. Greenleaf wrote that, "A true natural servant automatically responds to any problem by listening first." He further added, "True listening builds strength in other people." So practically speaking, this is a leader that automatically responds through active listening–to understand the other side. She will listen before she speaks, as she speaks, and after she speaks. In decision making, she listens completely before deciding. This takes practice.

2. Empathy
The second characteristic is empathy, which has been proven in this study to drive performance. Empathy is really an extension of listening, if you think about it. Servant leaders attempt to understand and empathize with others–to put themselves in others' shoes. This means listening without judgment. As empathetic leaders, workers are considered not only as employees, but as people who need respect and appreciation for their personal and professional development. This generates a competitive advantage.

3. Healing
What Spears meant by "healing" is that leaders recognize the opportunity to help make whole those with whom they come in contact. A servant leader tries to help people solve their problems and conflicts in relationships, because he/she wants to develop the skills of each individual. This leads to the formation of a business culture in which the working environment is characterized by dynamic, fun engagement and no fear from failure.

4. Awareness
Servant leaders have a strong sense of what is going on around them. They are always looking for cues, they know what's going on and will rarely be fooled. They're very self-aware.

5. Persuasion
Servant leaders don't take advantage of their power and status by coercing compliance; instead, they try to use influence to convince others. They are effective at building consensus within groups through influence and persuasion.

6. Conceptualization
This is the ability to look at a problem by thinking beyond the day-to-day realities. Greenleaf said that the servant leader can conceive solutions to problems that do not currently exist. They see beyond the limits of the business and focus on long term goals. They work their big hairy audacious goals, but they do it S.M.A.R.T.

7. Foresight
Foresight is the ability to foresee the likely outcome of a situation. It means understanding the lessons from the past, the realities of the present, and the likely consequence of a decision for the future.

8. Stewardship
This a commitment to not just serving the needs of others but also of the organization and its mission as a whole. It's holding your company in trust for the greater good of society.

9. Commitment to the Growth of People
Pretty self-explanatory. This is a demonstrated appreciation and open encouragement of others and their growth. In practice, this can include things like having a budget for personal and professional development, taking a personal interest in the ideas and suggestions from everyone, encouraging worker involvement in decision-making, and even helping out a laid-off employee find work.

10. Building Community
Servant leaders are what I call compassionate collaborators. They show appreciation and praise employees often for their contributions. They want to get to know what makes their employees tick, what drives them, what gets them up in the morning so that they can support them in those endeavors. As I've written before, building community can only happen through connecting and making relationships work.

Three Sections of the Full Spectrum
If you break down the characteristics into sections of the full spectrum of a servant leader, you'll see that the servant side of a servant-leader encompasses the listening, the empathy and the healing.

The leader side encompasses awareness, being able to persuade, conceptualization, and foresight. Every leader has to have those traits and be able to use them effectively.

And in the middle is where the two sides overlap into the servant-leader: stewardship, commitment to growing people and the building of community.

Put them all together, you have the best and most whole version of a leader, bar none.

A Few Questions in Closing
Now reflect, if you will, how you may have modeled some of these approaches in the last 24 hours. My questions in closing:

How have you been a servant leader reading the examples given?
What if we could think and act this way moving forward in our work? What would that do for your team, business, organization?
How would this change your roles as managers, executives, founders, board chairs, or even at home as spouses, fathers and mothers?

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