Tag Archives: going

Join and Earn Royalties for Life.

Are u a Inventor. Do you need Funding? Do you have a Product that you want to launch on Kickstarter or Indiegogo? Let the KULA Community assist you. Crowdfunding at it BEST. Let's launch your campaign or product  together!!  

If you haven't seen this yet, here are words from one of our inventors, Cliff Henthorn….

https://www.facebook.com/rong.kongtuo/videos/10154837206184191/

Join NOW and EARN: https://dz241.isrefer.com/go/kbrefer/a4864/
kulaBrands BUSINESS MODEL

Join This Amazing "Kula Brand Community" and  earn royalties for life. We are ready to make a difference. This is going to be HUGE.  https://dz241.isrefer.com/go/kbrefer/a4864/     

GET PAID OVER AND OVER ON THE ONE-TIME ACTIONS YOU TAKE TODAY!
ROYALTY INCOME IS THE BEST RESIDUAL INCOME ON THE PLANET! MULTIPLE STREAMS OF PASSIVE INCOME UNDER ONE ROOF!
It’s time for change! We are revolutionizing the entire home-based business model. Allow us to show you the two holy grails of financial freedom. SHOW ME THE WAY

 

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

The smartphone is eventually going to die, and then things are going to get really crazy

Apple CEO Tim Cook AP

 

One day, not too soon — but still sooner than you think — the smartphone will all but vanish, the way beepers and fax machines did before it.

Make no mistake: We're still probably at least a decade away from any kind of meaningful shift away from the smartphone. (And if we're all cyborgs by 2027, I'll happily eat my words. Assuming we're still eating at all, I guess.)

Yet, piece by piece, the groundwork for the eventual demise of the smartphone is being laid by Elon Musk, Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon, and a countless number of startups that still have a part to play.

And, let me tell you: If and when the smartphone does die, that's when things are going to get really weird for everybody. Not just in terms of individual products but in terms of how we actually live our everyday lives and maybe our humanity itself.

Here's a brief look at the slow, ceaseless march toward the death of the smartphone — and what the post-smartphone world is shaping up to look like.

The short term
People think of the iPhone and the smartphones it inspired as revolutionary devices — small enough to carry everywhere, hefty enough to handle an increasingly large number of daily tasks, and packed full of the right mix of cameras and GPS sensors to make apps like Snapchat and Uber uniquely possible.

But consider the smartphone from another perspective. The desktop PC and the laptop are made up of some combination of a mouse, keyboard, and monitor. The smartphone just took that model, shrank it, and made the input virtual and touch-based.

So take, for example, the Samsung Galaxy S8, unveiled this week. It's gorgeous with an amazing bezel-less screen and some real power under the hood. It's impressive, but it's more refinement than revolution.

Samsung Galaxy S8. Business Insider

Tellingly, though, the Galaxy S8 ships with Bixby, a new virtual assistant that Samsung promises will one day let you control every single feature and app with just your voice. It will also ship with a new version of the Gear VR virtual reality headset, developed in conjunction with Facebook's Oculus.

The next iPhone, too, is said to be shipping with upgrades to the Siri assistant, along with features aimed at bringing augmented reality into the mainstream.

And as devices like the Amazon Echo, the Sony PlayStation VR, and the Apple Watch continue to enjoy limited but substantial success, expect to see a lot more tech companies large and small taking more gambles and making more experiments on the next big wave in computing interfaces.

The medium term
In the medium term, all of these various experimental and first-stage technologies will start to congeal into something familiar but bizarre.

Microsoft, Facebook, Google, and the Google-backed Magic Leap are all working to build standalone augmented-reality headsets, which project detailed 3D images straight into your eyes. Even Apple is rumored to be working on this.

Microsoft's Alex Kipman recently told Business Insider that augmented reality could flat-out replace the smartphone, the TV, and anything else with a screen. There's not much use for a separate device sitting in your pocket or on your entertainment center if all your calls, chats, movies, and games are beamed into your eyes and overlaid on the world around you.

Apple's AirPods keep the Siri virtual assistant in your ears. Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

At the same time, gadgetry like the Amazon Echo or Apple's own AirPods become more and more important in this world. As artificial-intelligence systems like Apple's Siri, Amazon's Alexa, Samsung's Bixby, and Microsoft's Cortana get smarter, there will be a rise not just in talking to computers but in having them talk back.

In other words, computers will hijack your senses, more so than they already do, with your sight and your hearing intermediated by technology. It's a little scary. Think of what Facebook glitches could mean in a world where it doesn't just control what you read on your phone but in what you see in the world around you.

The promise, though, is a world where real life and technology blend more seamlessly. The major tech companies promise that this future means a world of fewer technological distractions and more balance, as the physical and digital world become the same thing. You decide how you feel about that.

The really crazy future
Still, all those decade-plus investments in the future still rely on gadgetry that you have to wear, even if it's only a pair of glasses. Some of the craziest, most forward-looking, most unpredictable advancements go even further — provided you're willing to wait a few extra decades, that is.

This week, we got our first look at Neuralink, a new company cofounded by Musk with a goal of building computers into our brains by way of "neural lace," a very early-stage technology that lays on your brain and bridges it to a computer. It's the next step beyond even that blending of the digital and physical worlds, as human and machine become one.

Assuming the science works — and lots of smart people believe that it will — this is the logical endpoint of the road that smartphones started us on. If smartphones gave us access to information and augmented reality puts that information in front of us when we need it, then putting neural lace in our brains just closes the gap.

Futurist Ray Kurzweil has been predicting our cyborg futures for a long time now. Tech Insider

Musk has said this is because the rise of artificial intelligence — which underpins a lot of the other technologies, including voice assistants and virtual reality — means humans will have to augment themselves just to keep up with the machines. If you're really curious about this idea, futurist Ray Kurzweil is the leading voice on the topic.

The idea of human/machine fusion is a terrifying one, with science-fiction writers, technologists, and philosophers alike having very good cause to ask what even makes us human in the first place. At the same time, the idea is so new that nobody really knows what this world would look like in practice.

So if and when the smartphone dies, it'll actually be the end of an era in more ways than one. It'll be the end of machines that we carry with us passively and the beginning of something that bridges our bodies straight into the ebb and flow of digital information. It's going to get weird.

And yet, lots of technologists already say that smartphones give us superpowers with access to knowledge, wisdom, and abilities beyond anything nature gave us. In some ways, augmenting the human mind would be the ultimate superpower. Then again, maybe I'm just an optimist.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

People are talking about hackers ‘ransoming’ Apple — here’s what’s actually going on

 

If you don't want to be hacked, don't use the same password across different services.

And if you're an Apple user, it's a good idea to check your Apple ID and iCloud account today to make sure it's using a unique and long password.

On Wednesday, a hacking group calling itself the Turkish Crime Family told Business Insider that it had about 600 million iCloud passwords it would use to reset users' accounts on April 7.

Apple told Business Insider in a statement that if the hackers had passwords, they did not come from a breach of Apple systems:

"There have not been any breaches in any of Apple's systems including iCloud and Apple ID. The alleged list of email addresses and passwords appears to have been obtained from previously compromised third-party services.

"We're actively monitoring to prevent unauthorized access to user accounts and are working with law enforcement to identify the criminals involved. To protect against these type of attacks, we always recommend that users always use strong passwords, not use those same passwords across sites and turn on two-factor authentication."

It is still possible that the group has some users' passwords. Information from several large breaches, including those of Yahoo and LinkedIn, have spread across the internet in recent years. If an Apple user has the same password and email for, say, LinkedIn and iCloud, there's a good chance that iCloud password is already publicly available.

Here's what you can do to protect yourself:

Turn on two-factor authentication. That means when you log in to your iCloud account you'll be asked to send a six-digit code to your phone. It's annoying, but it's the best way to ensure that your account remains your own.
Don't use the same password for multiple services. If one of your accounts is hacked or breached, hackers can essentially access all your accounts that used the same password. Make sure to use a different password for your Apple ID and your email account — here's how to change your Apple ID password and how to check if your password may already be public.
Make sure your password is long, random, and unique. Don't use your name, birthday, or other common words.
Why this matters now
Screen Shot 2017 03 23 at 10.28.06 AM Twitter
Over the past few days, the Turkish Crime Family has contacted media outlets saying it has 200 million, 250 million, 519 million, or as many as 750 million Apple ID account credentials culled from breaches of other services.

The hacking group also said it had been in contact with Apple and was demanding $75,000 in cryptocurrency like bitcoin or $100,000 in Apple gift cards.

If Apple did nothing, it would "face really serious server issues and customer complaints" in an attack on April 7, a member of the hacking group told Business Insider in an email. They said they were carrying out the attack in support of the Yahoo hacking suspect.

A report from Motherboard said the group had shown the outlet an email from one of the hackers to an Apple product-security specialist that discussed the ransom demands. That email is fake, a person with knowledge of Apple's security operations told Business Insider.

Apple is in contact with law enforcement about the ransom demand, the person said. Apple is unsure if the group's claims are true, but people at the company say they doubt they are.

Screen Shot 2017 03 23 at 10.29.10 AM Twitter
There are other reasons to doubt the hackers' claims, such as their thirst for publicity and their fluid story.

But even if the hackers are telling the truth, Apple users can protect themselves by making sure their Apple ID password is unique and hasn't been revealed in a previous breach.

"A breach means nothing in 2017 when you can just pull the exact same user information in smaller scales through companies that aren't as secure," the group purportedly said in a post on Pastebin in response to Apple's statement.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

7 Tips For Motivating Your Team (Even When The Going Gets Tough)

“ When people are crystal clear about the most important priorities of the organization and team they work with, and prioritize their work around those top priorities, not only are they many times more productive, they discover they have the time they need to have a whole life.” 

Stephen Covey'

You can spend months defining your team’s core values, articulating your Mission and Vision, and fashioning a flexible, up-to-the-minute strategy — but your whole tower will crumble if your team members don’t feel motivated enough to execute rapidly and consistently.

If their collective attitude boils down to “Who cares?” then you’ve lost the game before you’ve even begun.

If that’s true, then who’s at fault?

Well, you can blame your team if you like. You can even punish them for being unmotivated — a dangerous form of self-sabotage that will most likely force you farther toward failure. Or you can decide to shoulder the responsibility and work to engage your team and rev their motivational engines.

 

7 Tips For Motivating Your Team (Even When The Going Gets Tough)

The Lowdown
“Individual commitment to a group effort — that is what makes a team work, a company work, a society work, a civilization work.” So said legendary football coach Vince Lombardi, who had plenty of experience with both commitment and motivation.

The son of a second-generation Italian-American butcher whose business prospered during the Great Depression, Lombardi grew up with daily exposure to the type of commitment required not just to survive but to thrive during hard times. He later earned a football scholarship to Fordham University, where he picked up the skills necessary to excel as a coach at West Point, and later with the New York Giants, Green Bay Packers, and Washington Redskins.

What can you do to inspire your team to the Lombardi level of commitment? Start by showing them you believe in them; you are going to hold them to a higher standard, because you have confidence they can achieve it.

Try these tips, especially when the going gets tough:

 

1. Make sure everyone understands the big picture
If your team isn’t already familiar with the organization’s main goals, then lay them out in plain language.

Show them where they fit within the organizational structure, and why their work moves everyone toward those goals. Make them feel valued, so they’ll have reason to engage with and “own” their jobs.

2. Give them what they need
If team members lack the right tools or training, they may not feel capable of or confident about doing the tasks you’ve assigned them. Whether they need training, a new computer, a smartphone, or a better printer, make it happen, so they can move forward with confidence.

If they express a need for something to help them be more productive, and you fail to provide or approve it, they soon will stop coming to you with improvement ideas.

3. Plan carefully
Because long-term strategies rarely survive their first brushes with reality, you’ll need to collaborate with your team on how to best achieve them, because they probably know best. Review the plans and get everyone involved in how to proceed.

Give them active, important roles in building those plans, as well as controlling deadlines, scheduling, project management, and scope creep.

4. Establish performance goals
Provide reasonable objectives to shoot for, both as individuals and as a team, but make everyone stretch a little to reach them.

The goals can take the form of quotas, profit margins, commissions, projects completed early and under budget, or whatever else matters to your company or team.

5. Provide tracking metrics
Along the way, show them how they’re doing.

If the team realizes they’re they front-runners in a company-wide sales race, for example, they may work extra hard to stay there; or if they’re in second place, they may redouble their efforts to take first.

Consider it a report card for the team, one that may inspire them to kick it into high gear.

6. Be there for them
Lead from the front, ready to smooth the path and provide anything they need to in order to execute.

During a crunch time or crisis, roll up your sleeves, and work side-by-side with them until everything’s back to normal.

7. Celebrate successes
When something goes right, even something small, make sure your team knows you appreciate their efforts.

Public pats on the back are cheap, and in some cases, just as effective as cash. You can also provide treats for the break room, or take everyone to lunch when things go well.

 Flávio Rodrigues Vieira Flávio Rodrigues Vieira
Analista de negócios / Business Analyst • Mainland 3

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e