Schlagwort-Archive: jobs

Jobs vs. AI: What happens when everything is automated?

ZDNet sits down with open source columnist Bob Reselman to discuss a question from our not-too-distant future: what happens to jobs when everything is automated?
By David Gewirtz for ZDNet Government 

One of the reasons I like to interview experts and students of technological change is to look at the differing perspectives we encounter. Bob Reselman is a technology press colleague of mine. When he told me he was researching the impact of automation on jobs, I knew I had to sit down and chat with him.

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Bob asks, " What will we do when everything is automated?" As the author of How To Save Jobs [free download], I immediately went to what I thought was the the big concern: lots and lots of people out of work. But in our interview, Bob took the question somewhere else entirely. His concern is how will people spend their time.

It's an interesting concern, of course, but here's where disagreements occur. From my perspective, he seems to be putting the cart before the horse. I'm far more concerned about how people will put food on the table if automation takes jobs than how they will spend their leisure time.

Both of those arguments, however, ignore the real elephant in the room: how much of an impact will automation and AI really have on jobs going into the future? America's new Treasury Secretary, Steve Mnuchin, says that losing human jobs to AI is "not even on our radar screen." He says the problem is 50 years away. That seems entirely unrealistic to me, since jobs are, and have been, lost to automation ever since automation existed.

This is a very big topic. I encourage you to watch the accompanying video. There is no doubt that AI and automation will change the nature of work, just as the internet has, and as television, radio, automobiles, planes, and trains did in the past. As technologists, it's important to not just celebrate the wonderful things our technologies can do, but also be aware of the societal implications resulting from our innovations.

During our interview, Bob cited a number of interesting and troubling statistics. I asked him to provide sources for those stats, and here they are:

Ball state study on percentage of job displacement due to automation
Oxford study on the future of employment
Global Policy study on the potential loss of jobs to autonomous vehicles
Brookings Institute expert Mark Muro on the number of people it takes to produce a million dollars Special thanks to Bob Reselman. You can find him on Twitter at @reselbob. Here at ZDNet, we'll be keeping an eye on the overall question of AI's impact on work, both positive and negative. So stay tuned.

 

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Bah! Who Needs These Pesky Humans Anyway!?

Bah! Who Needs These Pesky Humans Anyway!!??

I think it’s ironic that we are seeing such a rise is labor-saving technology, i.e. Blockchain, and that we’re also in times when so many people need jobs. Seriously now…how many people really think blockchain is going to put more of those people to work?

I’m a bit skeptical. It might turn out that the people who lost their jobs from all the McDonalds automation will now be able to meet the very same in the unemployment office lines that they used to service at the drive-through window at McDonalds.

It was just today that I became conscious of this aspect of the dawning blockchain revolution. Although cryptocurrency is the area that most people associate with blockchain technology, when one looks deeper into the news, one finds that the banking and finance industry loves blockchain too.

Why?

Because it’s not only going to make much of their work more secure and accurate, it’s also going to allow them to eliminate a lot of jobs. One quote I pulled from the internet phrased it this way:

“a way to validate transactions through little or no human intervention.”

Yeah sure….humans are known for being terrible interventionists, right?

Undoubtedly there are reasonable applications of blockchain technology to provide better value to the consumer. Everybody complains about paperwork and bureaucracy in finance…and government.

Waitta minute!! Did I just say…GOVERNMENT??

Now there’s a niche that’s ripe for elimination of waste and bureaucracy!! (not to mention good ol’ “corruption”.

In fact, there probably is a dividing line somewhere… a demarcation between where blockchain is a net improvement vs a net detriment to the employment situation. But I don’t think anybody is putting much consideration into where that line is…right now.

But for the number crunchers in the financial services sector, blockchain comes at a good time. Their industry has become extremely competitive. It has been forced to become very service intensive because they’ve pretty much long since reached the limits of what they can do with bland numbers.

They all work with the same commodity and within the same mathematical system and to a large degree they even work with the same data. So, their only recourse (other than ‘inside deals’) is to try to focus on internal efficiency and creative branding.

Blockchain is good for them but not necessarily for the thousands of people who will be ‘liberated’ from the drudgery of their mere “jobs”.

Blockchain is specifically attractive to bankers because it tends to alleviate what they call their “Liquidity” challenges.

The term liquidity refers to the degree to which an asset or security can be quickly bought or sold in the market without affecting the asset's price and this is a growing concern in financial product trading activity. Blockchain technology can alleviate liquidity challenges by providing a way to reduce friction.

What is ‘friction’?

Friction simply refers to the limitation or resistance injected into a process by another factor, i.e. from paper-shuffling or other bureaucratic processes. Blockchain, because it automates so many of these processes, reduces ‘friction’ and improves the bottom line of the company.

Money (or Value) is everywhere, therefore buying and selling is (potentially) everywhere, therefore transactions are (potentially) everywhere. Thus, because blockchain is a decentralized technology, it can reside in decentralized devices much closer to where the actual work is being done and increase the speed that work is processed (and verified).

Thus allowing everyone more time to wander to…whatever.

Some very complex transactions might still require more humans in the loop. In fact, this whole process might go ‘full circle’ and human verification might eventually turn out to be an extra added service.

But the reality of blockchains and how they’re being used points to a future in which human third-party transaction validation and recordkeeping could be the exception rather than the rule.

Ain’t technology wonderful?

 

 

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6 Social Media Jobs That Are Great For Millennials

Jimmy Rohampton ,    CONTRIBUTOR
I cover how to use social media to level up your career  

Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.
If you’re a millennial, learning to use social media was as natural as learning to walk. That might be a bit of an exaggeration, but social media has been a big part of your life for nearly as long as you can remember. In fact, it’s such a central part of your day that you probably have a hard time staying away from your apps. On average, millennials spend 5.4 hours a day consuming user-generated content, much of it on social media.

If you consume a lot of content on Twitter, Facebook and more, a social media career might be right for you. After all, you’ve already put in the time as a digital native. Now, you might as well get paid for it. The key is to match your skill set and salary needs with the right social media job.

social media careers
Pexels.com

Then, you’ll get paid to do something you love. Here are a couple social media jobs that might be right for you:

1. Social Media Manager

Are you the type of person that likes to be in charge? If so, you might be perfect for a social media manager position. Social media managers are responsible for all aspects of social media campaigns. You’ll take care of the strategy, implementation, and marketing.

If you work for a small business, expect to wear a lot of hats with this position. You will be the resident strategist one minute, and the next minute you’ll be putting that strategy into action. If you work for a big company, though, you can expect to have some employees under you. These employees will take on most of the duties and you’ll watch over them.

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Social media managers make an annual median salary of $46,169 and there is a projected growth outlook of 13%. In other words, you can expect lots of these jobs to pop up in the coming years.

2. Social Media Specialist

If you excel at strategizing but don’t want all of the responsibilities that come with being a social media manager, you can become a social media specialist. Social media specialists are responsible for developing strategies to meet companies’ and clients’ social media needs.

Don’t worry, though. It’s not all work and no play. You’ll also immerse yourself in social media posts. In fact, you’ll need to monitor all of the social media conversations to determine which direction your company should go in when posting on social media. On average, social media specialists make $38,100.

3. Social Media Coordinator

As a coordinator, you’ll be responsible for making sure that all of the posts go live every day. You can’t just post on a whim, though. You’ll follow a posting calendar for all of the social media accounts. Message relevancy is very important for social media coordinators. You’ll speak to people in all of your company’s departments to make sure you’re staying on message with each post.

A social media coordinator has a median salary of $37,865 and it has a projected growth rate of 6% up to 2024.

4. Social Media Analyst
If you like the numbers side of social media, consider becoming a social media analyst. You’ll look at various metrics and trends to help your team cultivate a social media strategy. Keep in mind that analytics are constantly changing so you’ll need to keep your hands on the wheel at all times. You can expect a fast-paced career if you become an analyst.

Social media analysts make an average of $45,720 a year.

5. Social Media Community Manager

Do you spend a lot of time interacting with people (even strangers) online? If so, you might have the perfect personality to become a social media community manager. This fast-paced job puts you right in the middle of the online action. You answer questions, join conversations, and offer solutions.

In some cases, you’ll even have to get conversations started. You’ll be the spark that ignites exciting conversations on all of the channels. When you do this, you have to keep your company’s brand in mind. Every conversation should focus on the brand and improving the user experience.

Social media community managers make an average of $31,500 a year.

6. Social Media Planners

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You’ll make an average of $45,000 a year if you take a job as a social media planner.

 

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