Tag Archives: learn

Teach Them; Do you have children?

Do you have children?

Written by Hope on 03/11/2013
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Disciples, Life Change
"Therefore, go and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the Name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Teach these new disciples to obey all the commands I have given you. And be sure of this: I am with you always, even to the end of the age." Matthew 28:19-20

Do you have children? If so, you might know that the Bible instructs us to "Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old, he will not depart from it" (Proverbs 22:6). Taking a new Christian on a path of discipleship can be compared to teaching or training a child. Jesus said, "Let the children come to Me. Don’t stop them! For the Kingdom of God belongs to those who are like these children. I tell you the truth, anyone who doesn't receive the Kingdom of God like a child will never enter it" (Mark 10:14-15).

Faith Like a Child
Jesus taught, "unless you turn from your sins and become like little children, you will never get into the Kingdom of Heaven" (Matthew 18:3). He said, "anyone who welcomes a little child like this on My behalf is welcoming Me" (Matthew 18:5); your service to a new believer is an act of service to the Lord! But we must be careful to teach only what is in God’s Word. Jesus warned that it would be better to die than to "cause one of these little ones who trusts in Me to fall into sin" (Matthew 18:6).

Gift from the Lord
God loves and highly values every person. His Word tells us that "children are a gift from the Lord" (Psalm 127:3). Your disciple, believing in God with faith like a child's, is also a valuable person to the Lord. Like a child, they can turn to you to gain knowledge of the Lord. If you teach your disciple the ways of the Lord while he or she is "young" in faith, they may be more likely to follow the Lord all their life. Be encouraged: "Jesus said to the people who believed in Him, 'You are truly My disciples if you remain faithful to My teachings'" (John 8:31).

Prayer, Care, and Share Jesus
"Teach them to obey everything I have commanded you!”

Scripture: Matthew 28:19-20

One of the most exciting ways we hope your faith is strengthened when learning from the Prayer, Care and Share Jesus guide (PCS) is by becoming more confident when sharing Jesus with others.

When you do lead someone to Christ, you might even feel led to share what you’ve learned in the PCS guide. It can be a great discipleship tool!

In Matthew 28: 19-20, Jesus commands us to make disciples of all nations, baptizing them and teaching them to obey (not just know) all of Jesus' commandments.

When you walk someone through accepting Jesus in their life, it’s a great idea to start the discipleship process right away – "teaching the new believer to obey everything Jesus commanded." You can also get them connected to a church or community of faith. You might not be able or feel led to be the one to disciple the new believer. But, you can help them find a way to get discipled by connecting with someone or a Christian community or church. When I have led people to Christ whom I won’t see again, such as taxi drivers or flight attendants, I have prayed and asked the Holy Spirit to orchestrate their follow-up.

You can teach them about things that Jesus teaches in the Bible like baptism, reading the Bible, prayer, involvement in a community of believers (such as a church or house church); taking communion (remembering Christ in the way he commanded us); and sanctification ("go and sin no more." John 8:11). These are not all of Jesus' teachings, but they are a good start for your new believer.

This week, start praying about your role in someone’s life as a discipleship mentor. Ask for guidance, wisdom and compassion.

Pray this week:

That your children and disciples will remain faithful to the Lord all their life.

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Business Mistakes Learned the Hard Way: 5 Entrepreneurs Share their Story

Where are you in your entrepreneurial pursuits? Idea stage? Development stage? Growth Stage? Whatever stage that may be, there is excitement and uncertainty. Many of us know to seek out mentors, business coaches, and peers about their experiences and insights. For good reason too: learn from them. Listen to their advice. Take their words of wisdom and apply it to your own situation. Yet, regardless of where we are in the process, we will encounter obstacles and problems. We KNOW we will make mistakes; we KNOW there will be failure, but we fight to minimize the depth of failure. However, there are situations that pop up without warning or they creep up on us to create havoc. These 5 entrepreneurs share their story and lessons learned:

Jennifer Tamborski, Virtual Admin Experts: “Hiring people and being a leader is entirely different from the corporate world. I hired employees and set them loose, assuming they knew what I knew. When they came back to me confused and lost, I realized I didn’t have the processes necessary for my employees to effectively perform their job. It’s a process I had to learn as I taught them.”

Lesson learned: a clear, concise, communication and documentation plan must be established. Follow-up with employees is just as important as follow-up with clients.

Chris MacLellan, Whole Care Network: “My theological background inspired me to trust without hesitation. That approach to life did not transfer well to business. I didn’t discover this until I handed over the IP (intellectual property) to a business connection in which the gesture was not reciprocated. As a result, I lost lots of money and my humility. It took a great deal of time to restructure my business, much of which conflicted with my trusting nature.”

Lesson learned: Life skills do not always transfer well to business skills.

Mary Scott, Make Believe TV: “Create a clear, contractual arrangement for each project which includes payment agreements and pricing for situations that influence the service offered. All decisions must be clear and understood before the project (or any part of the business arrangement) begins. If it isn’t clear, it will cost a lot of time, money, and frustration.

Lesson learned: Do not rush into a project without the proper documentation.

Angie Monko, Harmony Harbor Coaching: “I jumped into business without a clear plan, quickly becoming distracted by multiple business objectives. I didn’t recognize the situation until ~18 months later when cash flow and momentum declined. It took another 18 months to create a business plan and to begin recovery.”

Lesson learned: Create a business plan, follow it, and revise as your business shifts and grows.

Paul Heirendt, True Bearing Advisors: During my corporate days, I had ‘two young guys’ working with me. They frequently joked, ‘You’re not the boss of me’, which resulted in them learning very little and becoming a liability rather than an asset. I eventually left the corporate world and took one of these young guys with me. As his urging, we moved into his uncle’s free office space in downtown St. Louis. The caveat: the uncle’s son must become the CEO of my company. With no written partnership and nearly 100% of the company in my name, I dealt with legal issues, lost opportunities, lost revenue, and lots of bad blood.”

Lesson learned: It’s better off not partnering unless each member can prove their value AND share the same business goals.

These entrepreneurs faced some crushing blows to their business growth but regrouped, adjusted and recovered. Communication and documentation were the top business issues. How can you apply their lessons? Share your ideas or stories below.

Kristen Edens

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Do you worry about money?

3 reasons not to worry about money

Written by Hope on 08/03/2015
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Finances, Money, Worry
“Honor the Lord with your wealth and with the best part of everything you produce.” Proverbs 3:9

The Bible is full of stories showing God working in the lives of wealthy people. Abraham, Israel’s King David, and Lydia (a woman who sold purple dye) are just a few. But when Jesus also said that “it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter the Kingdom of God!” it was a warning that money can hurt more than it helps. (Matthew 19:24). How can you follow Jesus and His Word rather than letting money keep you from following God? Here are 3 truths to help.

Money Will Never Satisfy
Although money is not a bad thing, “the love of money is the root of all kinds of evil” (1 Timothy 6:10). Christians should not let anything–including money–interfere with their relationship with God. God is a great provider. Even among the wealthy, “those who love money will never have enough” (Ecclesiastes 5:10). The “happiness” found in things money can buy will not last, for “moths eat them and rust destroys them and thieves break through and steal.” (Matthew 6:19) Remember that Jesus gives His joy as a gift–and doesn’t take it back! (John 15:11)

God Gives What We Need
As Christians, we should strive to take good care of anything God blesses us with–including money. Our goal is to use money in a wise way. This includes providing for ourselves, our families and giving to support the local church. But how can you avoid worrying about money? God tells us to focus on Him. Jesus taught, “seek the Kingdom of God above all else, and live righteously, and He will give you everything you need” (Matthew 6:33). As you deal with and work for your money, “seek God’s will in all you do, and He will show you which path to take” (Proverbs 3:6).

If You Are Walking With God, Be Content As He Provides
The Apostle Paul famously wrote, “I have learned how to be content with whatever I have” (Philippians 4:11). God promised to provide for those who put Him first. So you do not have to “worry about anything; instead, pray about everything” (Philippians 4:6). Be faithful with your money, but when you feel worried, “give your burdens to the Lord, and He will take care of you” (Psalm 55:22). Christians can learn to “be satisfied with what you have, for God has said, ‘I will never fail you’” (Hebrews 13:5).

Pray this week:

that God will provide for you and help you learn to glorify Him with your financial resources.

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The Beatitudes: How to Have a Blessed Life

Jesus’ Radically Dependent Life Reproduced in His Followers

Written by GodLife on 24/01/2017
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Jesus, Happy, Blessed, Grace, Mercy
It is enough for disciples to be like their teacher and for slaves to be like their master.

Matthew 10:25
As followers of Jesus, we have to know what He taught in order to know Him and follow Him. Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount, found in the book of Matthew (Chapters 5-7), is a great start. A religious scholar once said that nothing “…exhorts us more than this Sermon on the Mount to be what we are meant to be, and to live as we are meant to live; to be like Christ by being a complete contrast to everyone who does not belong to Christ.”

Do you want your life to stand out in radical contrast to the rest of the world? Let His teachings be your guide.

“God blesses those people who depend only on him. They belong to the kingdom of heaven!” (Matthew 5:3)

This means we come to understand we have nothing to offer God. Jesus opened His public ministry with the command to “repent” (Matthew 4:17), and depending only on Jesus is included in this idea. This sense of spiritual poverty forms the core of all of the blessings.

“God blesses those people who grieve. They will find comfort!” (Matthew 5:4)

Another Gospel clarifies: “God will bless you people who are crying. You will laugh!” (Luke 6:21) It may sound like a contradiction, but it isn’t. One day, all of the world’s kingdoms will be under Jesus’ personal rule! Injustice will be put down. Tears will be wiped away. But only those who grieve over things as they are today will be comforted.

“God blesses those people who are humble. The earth will belong to them!” (Matthew 5:5)

In Philippians 2:5-11, Jesus is praised for His deep humility and obedience to His Father’s plan. Those who humble themselves after His example will be exalted (Luke 14:11) as He was.

“God blesses those people who want to obey him more than to eat or drink. They will be given what they want!” (Matthew 5:6)

Jesus served God and others before His own needs (John 4:34), giving His followers an example.

“God blesses those people who are merciful. They will be treated with mercy!” (Matthew 5:7)

Really understanding forgiveness helps us forgive others. Those unwilling to forgive demonstrate that they have not yet been forgiven. (Matthew 18:21-35)

“God blesses those people whose hearts are pure. They will see him!” (Matthew 5:8)

Jesus forgives those who trust Him. When we confess, He takes our sin away, making us fit to see Him. (1 John 1:9)

“God blesses those people who make peace. They will be called his children!” (Matthew 5:9)

“Prince of Peace” (Isaiah 9:6) is one of Jesus’ titles. In order to be called His children, we must be peacemakers.

“God blesses those people who are treated badly for doing right. They belong to the kingdom of heaven.” (Matthew 5:10)

Jesus goes on to personalize this blessing for those listening: “God will bless you when people insult you, mistreat you, and tell all kinds of evil lies about you because of me. Be happy and excited! You will have a great reward in heaven. People did these same things to the prophets who lived long ago.” (Matthew 5:11-12)

When persecuted, Jesus’ followers “were happy, because God had considered them worthy to suffer for the sake of Jesus” (Acts 5:41). As He had predicted, they were hated and mistreated just as He had been. (John 15:18-22, Matthew 10:18-25)

If anyone consistently lived this kind of life, they should be blessed by everyone, right? Who would be unkind to a humble, selfless, pure-hearted person who forgives others and is eager to obey God?

Of course we know that Jesus Himself was all these things. He was beaten, crowned with thorns and nailed to a cross to die, while a murderer was set free. So, like Jesus, we can expect mistreatment. And like His disciples, we can consider the world's mistreatment of us God's seal of approval on our lives when we live this way. The "happiness" of the Beatitudes does not come from the fickle approval of this world. It is an eternal blessedness: God's approval on our submission to His plan for our lives.

Pray this week:

Father, I see through these teachings that Jesus’ followers must have no trust in the world or its approval. I see Jesus’ example through all of these blessings, and I know that only He can make me over in His image. Be at work in me to want this more than anything else in the world. AMEN

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6 Social Media Jobs That Are Great For Millennials

Jimmy Rohampton ,    CONTRIBUTOR
I cover how to use social media to level up your career  

Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.
If you’re a millennial, learning to use social media was as natural as learning to walk. That might be a bit of an exaggeration, but social media has been a big part of your life for nearly as long as you can remember. In fact, it’s such a central part of your day that you probably have a hard time staying away from your apps. On average, millennials spend 5.4 hours a day consuming user-generated content, much of it on social media.

If you consume a lot of content on Twitter, Facebook and more, a social media career might be right for you. After all, you’ve already put in the time as a digital native. Now, you might as well get paid for it. The key is to match your skill set and salary needs with the right social media job.

social media careers
Pexels.com

Then, you’ll get paid to do something you love. Here are a couple social media jobs that might be right for you:

1. Social Media Manager

Are you the type of person that likes to be in charge? If so, you might be perfect for a social media manager position. Social media managers are responsible for all aspects of social media campaigns. You’ll take care of the strategy, implementation, and marketing.

If you work for a small business, expect to wear a lot of hats with this position. You will be the resident strategist one minute, and the next minute you’ll be putting that strategy into action. If you work for a big company, though, you can expect to have some employees under you. These employees will take on most of the duties and you’ll watch over them.

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Social media managers make an annual median salary of $46,169 and there is a projected growth outlook of 13%. In other words, you can expect lots of these jobs to pop up in the coming years.

2. Social Media Specialist

If you excel at strategizing but don’t want all of the responsibilities that come with being a social media manager, you can become a social media specialist. Social media specialists are responsible for developing strategies to meet companies’ and clients’ social media needs.

Don’t worry, though. It’s not all work and no play. You’ll also immerse yourself in social media posts. In fact, you’ll need to monitor all of the social media conversations to determine which direction your company should go in when posting on social media. On average, social media specialists make $38,100.

3. Social Media Coordinator

As a coordinator, you’ll be responsible for making sure that all of the posts go live every day. You can’t just post on a whim, though. You’ll follow a posting calendar for all of the social media accounts. Message relevancy is very important for social media coordinators. You’ll speak to people in all of your company’s departments to make sure you’re staying on message with each post.

A social media coordinator has a median salary of $37,865 and it has a projected growth rate of 6% up to 2024.

4. Social Media Analyst
If you like the numbers side of social media, consider becoming a social media analyst. You’ll look at various metrics and trends to help your team cultivate a social media strategy. Keep in mind that analytics are constantly changing so you’ll need to keep your hands on the wheel at all times. You can expect a fast-paced career if you become an analyst.

Social media analysts make an average of $45,720 a year.

5. Social Media Community Manager

Do you spend a lot of time interacting with people (even strangers) online? If so, you might have the perfect personality to become a social media community manager. This fast-paced job puts you right in the middle of the online action. You answer questions, join conversations, and offer solutions.

In some cases, you’ll even have to get conversations started. You’ll be the spark that ignites exciting conversations on all of the channels. When you do this, you have to keep your company’s brand in mind. Every conversation should focus on the brand and improving the user experience.

Social media community managers make an average of $31,500 a year.

6. Social Media Planners

Recommended by Forbes
6 Ways To Turn Your Social Media Expertise IntIf you have a knack for advertising, you might be interested in becoming a social media planner. As a planner, it will be up to you to find a way to advertise a product or brand across social channels. You’ll have to allocate the budget and make the best advertising purchases for your company or clients.

You’ll make an average of $45,000 a year if you take a job as a social media planner.

 

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Thank you for your grace and kindness…

"No One":
For those of you who don't know, my youngest son, Christopher, is on the autistic spectrum. I went to his back to school night on Thursday and took a picture of one of his projects displayed on the wall, one of many cute little cards that all the kids in his class had filled out. It asked him to list his favorite foods, sport, TV shows etc.
I took the picture hurriedly, and didn't notice all the answers he had filled out at that time. It was only after I got home that something stood out upon closer review.
Do you guys remember, a couple of weeks ago, the massive amount of press that the Florida State Football player got when he sat down at the lunch table with an autistic boy that was eating alone? That player didn't know the boy was on the autistic spectrum when he sat down with him…he just saw a boy eating lunch all by himself and decided to join him. A teacher snapped a picture of the moment and it went viral. That's what made the story great….it wasn't staged…it was just a real moment of human kindness.
The follow up to that story was that the boy no longer ate alone; that the other kids NOW were sitting with him and patting him on the back. That boy now had "friends",B and everything was right with the world.
Something that wasn't right was fixed, and tied up neatly with a pretty little bow of kindness and understanding.
But in my head, I asked "Where were those kids prior to this child being thrust into the spotlight? We know where they were: they're in the picture: sitting at other tables, ignoring him.
If that football player had not sat down next to that child, and if it hadn't become a national news story, that kid would still be sitting by himself today.
And it's not their fault…. that's the saddest part. They were clearly not taught to embrace and accept the differences of others. Not by their teachers, which would have been nice, had they thought to do so, but by their parents. I don't mean to imply that parents that don't have this conversation with their kids are bad people, but only that somewhere in between working, soccer practice, and homework, it never occurred to them to have this particular conversation. I'm sure that if Christopher were typical (that's the word we use instead of "normal" in our world of 'Holland', for our developmentally delayed children), I would have not had this conversation with him either.
Christopher's brothers have had many, many sleepovers over the years, obviously in front of him, and it has not gone unnoticed.
"Can I have sleepover?" Christopher has asked.
"Sure, buddy….with whom?" As a response, he would flap his arms and stim instead of answeting. He didn't have an answer because he didn't have a name.
Because he didn't have a friend.
He's never had a friend.
Ever.
He just turned eleven.
And because he's had no friends….there was no one to invite.
And I don't have a solution. I don't have an answer. The reality is that I have to rely on the compassion of others to be incredibly understanding in order just to sit next to him, attempt to engage him, and make him feel included.
My son is very smart and has a great sense of humor. Every adult that meets him is drawn to him. However, because he needs the input, he will spontaneously flap his arms and make loud, guttural sounds from time to time. It draws a lot of attention in public. If you're not used to it, it's normal to feel embarrassed, as you will have all the eyes in the room upon you. He will ask the same question fifty times in a short period of time (His latest is "What time do you go to bed?" and "What's your addtess?").
I typically have to tell servers in restaurants just to give him the restaurant's address…as once he has a satisfactory answer, he will usually move on.
Like I said, there's no easy answer for this…at the end of the day it comes down to compassion, empathy and understanding.
But mostly empathy. Not from you guys, but from your children. As far as I know, (save for one time), Christopher's classmates have never been overtly cruel to him. What they have done, however, is to exclude him. And frankly, I understand this. His classmates are delayed as well, but most not as much as Christopher. They are figuring out how to interact socially every day, and because Christopher cannot engage them in a typical way, he gets left behind…excluded.
Until Thursday, I didn't know how aware he was of this divide, as he does not often talk about his peers. I should not have been surprised as he makes his wants (but not his emotional needs) very clear….but I was. Mostly, I suppose, because I had never seen him put in down on paper. For the first time, it was staring at me in the face.
I guess I'm sharing this because when asked to list his friends he wrote "no one". Never have five letters cut so deep, and they weren't even directed at me….it was just an overly simplistic statement that spoke volumes.
And because I know him so well, and because I have pretty good handle on him after raising him for eleven years, I know this disconnect makes him feel lonely, and it makes him sad.
Usually, I have to figure out what Christopher is trying to say, as his manner of speaking is very straightforward; very black and white.
This time I did not.
It's clear to me that he desperately wants to be part of the group, but his challenges make it difficult for his peers to include him.
The only solution I can come up with is to share this with you and ask that you have a conversation with your kids. Please tell them that children with special needs understand far more than we give them credit for. They notice when others exclude them. They notice when they are teased behind their back (a lot of times "behind their back" is right in front of them because they think the 'different' child doesn't understand). But mostly they are very much in tune when they are treated differently from everyone else.
Trust me when I tell you this hurts them. Even if it's not obvious to you and me.
For the first time ever, I'm going to ask for two favor, here, on Facebook.
One: Share this post on your time line. Awareness and empathy are the only solutions I can come up with.
Two: Speak with your children. Show them the video of the Florida State Football player. The Internet is full of feel-good stories about a special needs child being included. Remember the special needs child that was put in the basketball game for the last few minutes of the final game of the season? Very recently, there was the prom king who gave his crown to a special needs classmate.
These stories are newsworthy because they are unusual. We are not used to hearing about kids being kind to those that are different and unique.
I not so naive that I think this post is going to change the world. But, if, by sharing this, I can make you think about having a conversation with your children about empathy, about going out of their way to include those that are different from everybody else, especially if it goes against the group mentality, especially if it's not socially poplar (I'm not so old that I don't remember that this takes bravery…bravery to break from the confines of whet your friends think is cool in the middle and high school worlds), then I will feel like Christopher's voice has been heard.
Because even though he can't say it, he wants to be included.
He wants a voice, that, at the moment, he doesn't have.
And he needs help to find his voice.
And the child that will finally reach out to him, that will help him, that will include him, will be the kindest child, the child that does the right thing by going above and beyond.
He will be Charlie Bucket.
And that child will be Christopher's first true friend.
Thanks for listening.
Sincerely,
Christopher's Dad
UPDATE:
As I have just leaned that this has gone viral, All of the requests I have been receiving to write Christopher a letter or send a care package now make sense. This was an idea that was started by KMBZ radio personalities Dana and Scott, or one of their listeners to be precise, so this "card shower" is on its way.
Many of you have asked to send cards and packages to Christopher, so, please join the party…I will be posting his reactions online. You may write to him at: Christopher Cornelius….96 Valley View Drive…Rockaway NJ )7866. Thank you for your grace and kindness….it is very much appreciated!  Bob Cornelius

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Learn To Take Responsibility

Most of us don't want to take responsiblity for our actions and problems.It's always someone else or the world,but never us.I'v heard some people say that they need someone to give them responsibility,"what they really are saying is that they need someone to tell them what to do.

But the truth is that no one will give you responsibility;it's up to you to become responsible by yourself. Become responsible by looking out for a need and reaching out to meet that need.That is a principle of success.There are people who complain about situations they could actually do something about,if only they would take some responsibility.See the opportunity to help out where you can, it will make you a better person and will show you some responsibility.

Learn to be responsible in church,at home,in school and at work.Have the ability to respond when there's a need,cause no one might.If you are a young person living with your parents,make up your mind that your impact would be felt at home and if you are a parent,ensure that you live up to your obligation to your kids,brought them up inthe way of the Lord.

CONCLUSION
Learn to be responsible;responsible people are noble,it will reveals the greatness in you.

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