Tag Archives: startup

Top 5 Startup Instant-Messaging Apps With Features to Help Boost Your Business

Can you remember when we used to communicate the old fashioned way? Phone conversations, faxes, and even emails have their disadvantages. You’re lucky you are now living in an age where instant messaging apps are taking over. Now it’s possible to reach out to people in seconds from a smartphone you can carry everywhere with you, and you won’t have to wait around to get what you want. In other words, the advantages of IM means you’ll be able to make a lot more money due to the extra time you will have available to focus on work.

The Huge Advantages of IM

A lot of businesses don’t yet know the full power of instant messaging. Everyone can appreciate they’ll be able to save a great deal of time, plus the convenience and price of the apps is easy to understand. What a lot of people running a business don’t realize is the added benefits you’ll find in lots of specialized apps at the time of writing. The IM startup scene has seen an explosion in the number of companies trying to stand out by focusing their efforts on small features certain businesses will find incredibly useful.

We’re going to look at the top five startups and you’ll find out what makes them so unique. You could also start using most of them for free right away.

Instant Messaging App 1 – MoneyMailMe

MoneyMailMe could possibly be the biggest thing to hit the FinTech industry since PayPal. Not only will you be able to communicate with people through the app, but you’ll be able to send money all over the world instantly from an e-wallet you will be able to top up. Businesses are now getting into the habit of using lots of contractors, especially if they’re small and unable to hire lots of full-time employees. It means the need for someone to carry out odd jobs is vital.  https://youtu.be/8LS2yCWlTtc

You could easily converse with contractors through MoneyMailMe, and when a job is complete it will take less than a minute to pay them. Everything will be logged on the app, so you’ll know exactly where your money went when it’s time to sort out your finances. It works in a number of different currencies and will take care of currency exchange rates. It’s also 100 percent secure, which you would expect whenever messages or money is being sent or received. A good time to migrate to MoneyMailMe from your existing app is now, particularly because its a great app and WhatsApp is selling-out its users by sharing their data with Facebook.

Instant Messaging App 2 – Google Allo

International Power is a very large power company based in London, and they discovered the executive team were spending an average of 1.5 hours per day using email. Can you imagine how much money a company wastes every year when all of their employees send and receive emails every day? Most of the time wasted is spent checking if they’ve received anything in the first place, which is why Google Allo is going to become a tremendous business app. Google Allo has the ability to connect directly with your Gmail account. https://youtu.be/v9n3drO4cOY

It means constantly checking for imaginary emails will become a thing of the past, because when you’re using Google Allo you’ll know when you receive anything. Smart Reply will also save you tons of time by learning how you communicate with people in order to do lots of the work for you. The Whisper/Shout feature is also perfect for businesses, because you need to know exactly what someone is saying and the ability to shrink or enlarge words to convey your message properly.

Instant Messaging App 3 – TexApp

There was an absolute uproar last year when hacked Sony emails found their way onto the web. Some of the emails contained damning conversations leaving a number of executives in a terrible situation. The only reason this happened in the first place was because they were silly enough to allow their communications to be hacked, which is where TexApp can swoop in and save the day. They claim to be the most secure instant messaging app available in the world. https://youtu.be/r4HQ8Bp-pfw

The level of encryption they use will ensure nobody will be able to get their hands on what your employees are talking about. This is ideal for anyone in general, but it will benefit those who have to discuss secretive things the most. If anyone can find out what you’re discussing it could cause a lot of damage to your business such as by people stealing your trade-secrets, so if you don’t want your secrets leaking out TexApp is a good choice. It also has a lovely user interface you’ll find easy to use when chatting.

Instant Messaging App 4 – Google Duo

Google Duo is another one of the apps Google has released to help cement their place as a powerhouse in the business world. Instead of speaking with someone through text you’ll be able to video call them, which is sometimes a lot more handy in certain situations. It’s good to look someone in the face when you’re speaking so you’ll see their facial expressions. The only downside is starting a conversation under less than ideal circumstances, but Google Duo will let you ignore someone by showing you what they’re doing before you answer. https://youtu.be/01qK94KBwY8

If they’re not on their own or it looks like they’re walking around in a busy street, you might decide to ignore them until they to reach out next time. Due to the fact Google Duo is based around video calling it’s the perfect way to stay in control. The app prides itself on being completely basic, so it won’t be another one of those you’ll need to spend time learning how to use. If you need to chat with someone face-to-face there are lots of options available, but none will let you get back to work quickly like this one.

Instant Messaging App 5 – Globr

CNN published a list of American companies exporting jobs to places like China, where it’s much cheaper to manufacture products among other things. Whether or not their findings will hurt the country isn’t the point, but it does tell you businesses will need to communicate with people from all over the world. It’s almost impossible to do business with anyone while keeping costs at their lowest if you can’t understand them. The Globr app will let you speak over instant messaging with foreigners and it will translate your words into their language.  https://youtu.be/Zo4yuLbflfQ

If you’re running a business you want to get the most out of your overseas contacts, then Globr is going to be the cheapest way you’ll be able to achieve it. It will mean you don’t need to send employees abroad as often to make sure your orders are being carried out correctly. Globr is also a great app for companies with plans to expand their business in the future, because sometimes the only thing stopping you is the fear of something going wrong due to a breakdown in communication.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

The 1 problem why 99% startups die before birth

Crys T. T. Nguyen 
Founder, Creative Director • Essenture
The 1 problem why 99% startups die before birth

This originated from my short answer to a question on Quora (http://qr.ae/TMqjWO):

What tips could set one up for creating a successful internet based business?
Sell first, build later.

Supply and demand. The order is: validate demand first, create supply later.

Many startups, including my own in the past, are born just for the sake of creating supply, without validating demand. They’d go full out on creating a product/service, only then figure out if there’s demand and how to sell it.

In reality, it’s supposed to be the other way around. Demand first, supply second. Validate your “supply idea” using an MVP (Minimum Viable Product) first. Only actually create that supply when you’re sure there’s sufficient demand. Your MVP can be as simple as a landing page describing what problem you’re trying to solve and how exactly you’re gonna solve it. Put up an email subscription form and share that MVP (reddit, producthunt, etc., depending on your niche), see if the world actually wants it.

Thanks for reading! If you've enjoyed this piece, consider sharing with people who'll find it useful.

About @crysttn: I'm an Agency Founder and Creative Director, building brands and creative teams. Join my conversations about #Entrepreneurship, #Startup, #GrowthHacking and more, on Twitter. Oh, and I blog every so often.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

36 Startup metrics every SaaS founder should follow up with

Bhavik Limbani in Lifestyle, IT – Information Technology, Entrepreneurs
Mobile Apps Developer • 
36 Startup metrics every SaaS founder should follow up with

Entrepreneurship is always referred to a roller-coaster ride and the fact doesn’t come without valid reasons. When you are starting up, you don’t just start with an idea where you are creating a product or service, but you are striving to create a sustainable business and there’s much more to it. You have got to evaluate the market, raise enough money, think about growth and profitability,  and most importantly gauge your own personal growth. Until and unless you are authentic about your own conviction and see it clearly coming up along the way (no matter how small it is), you might be spending a lot of useless time working hard on vague goals. It is important to track some key metrics to turn  your startup into a profitable business. These 36 startup metrics will not just help you keep a keen eye on your business but also give you a clarity of vision of the journey ahead.

Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR)
MRR is the total revenue that your business gets from paid customers on monthly basis. It is probably the most important metric for startups which are based on subscription model. If you get a customer on board, then prices are charged on a regular basis. You should track your MRR  and always strive for it's uplift. 

Annual Recurring Revenue (ARR)
Recurring means there’s a subscription in place and customer is charged on a recurring basis rather than on one time basis. This is calculated simply by multiplying the monthly recurring value by 12. 

Note: Calculation of ARR excludes any one-time fee or upfront cost you charge from the customer during onboarding. 

Average Revenue per Account (ARPA)
It refers to the revenue that your business earns from each account typically over a month or a year. It can also be thought of as revenue earned per customer but you should remember that a customer can have more than one account. It analyses a company's revenue generation and growth at the per-unit level and thus help investors to identify which products are high or low revenue-generators. This can immensely help your business to make decisions on rolling out of future products.

Gross Profit
Gross profit is the difference between the total revenue and the costs of goods you sell. Gross profit is the profit a company makes after deducting the costs associated with making and selling its products, or the costs associated with providing its services.

Total Contract Value
It is the projection of your booking value and helps you at times when you are planning your revenue or tracking the growth of your startup. It involves all the one-time and recurring charges and professional service fees but doesn't include usage charges.

Annual Contact Value (ACV)
ACV  measures the value of a contract over a 12-month period. So let’s say a customer commits to a 24-month contract of $160,000. Considering this money will be recognized as revenue ratably, you will have $80,000 as your ACV.

Lifetime Value (LV)
It is how much you expect to earn from a particular customer during the time they are involved with your business. For the profitability of your business, it is important that the CAC is always less than the LV. If CAC is far greater that LV, your business will require significant amount of capital to grow and run and that is no way desirable.

Deferred Revenue
Deferred revenue, or unearned revenue, refers to advance payments for products or services that are to be delivered in the future. It is considered as a liability for a business as it refers to revenue that’s not being earned and is still owed to a customer.

Billings
It is the total of current quarter revenue and he total of deferred revenue from the previous quarter.

Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC)
A startup's growth entirely depends on customer acquisition and of course, there's a significant amount of cost involved which you can't afford to neglect. It helps you to evaluate the efficiency of your sales process. If the metrics is not improving over time, you will quickly understand that there's a need to make few tweaks at steps to reduce cost and increase the number of customers involved with your startup.

Customer Concentration Risk
Any founder should be aware of the customer concentration risk especially if their business is dependent on top clients. It is the ratio between the size of the business’s top customers and the total revenue of the business. You may have a customer concentration risk if one or more of your customer’s total revenue for the year represents 8% or more of all your customers’ revenue for the same year.

Daily Active Users
Daily Active Users are the number of users who are active on your platform per day. This doesn’t include one-time users. 

Monthly Active Users
Monthly Active Users are the number of users who are active on your platform per month. This doesn’t include one-time users. This helps you understand how useful your product/service is and it is important in this case to take reviews from existing users for improvement.

Number of logins
As the name suggests, it is the number of users logging in to the account to use or view the product or service.

Activation Rate
It measures of the number of converts that your startup gets, i.e., how many prospects started using your product/service on a regular basis. It can be estimated when a user takes some kind of action like a sign up or a download. This is especially true for SaaS based products which generally work on a freemium model.

Month-on-Month Growth (MOM)
This is the average of monthly growth rate of your startup. Although investors like to see the compounded month-on-month growth as it helps to understand the periodic growth of your startup.

Compounded Monthly Growth Rate (CMGR)
It measures the return of an investment over a certain period of time. It takes three coefficients into consideration – investment’s beginning value, ending value and the time period. It is calculated simply by using the formula – {(ending value/beginning value) ^ Number of months} – 1

Monthly Churn Rate
Churn Rate is the measure of the percentage of subscribers who discontinue with their subscriptions within a given time period. Monthly Churn Rate tells you the total number of customers that you have lost in a particular month.

Retention by Cohort
One way to know if customers love your product is through Retention by Cohort. It is calculated as the percentage of original installed base i.e., in the first month, who are still engaging with your business.

Gross Churn Rate
It is the measure of the monthly recurring revenue that you lose in a month when subscribers or customers discontinue with your service.

Net Churn
It is calculated as – (MRR lost – MRR from upsells)this month/MRR at the beginning of the month. It is an important metrics to understand how well you resonate with your customers. It should descend over time and if it doesn't, it's time to first figure out the reasons.

Monthly Cash Burn Rate
It is the money that goes out of the door every month. This is one of the most complicated factors that many startups fail to understand and hence fail. To be successful, you are ought to keep a check on it.

Net Burn Rate
It is the difference between revenues and gross burn. This helps you determine how long you can survive, how close you are to break even and when and how you can start generating profits.

Gross Burn
It is a measure of all the cash outlays and monthly expenses that your startup incurs. If you are a startup with not much cash in hand, this is one of the most important factors that you should be concerned about.

Total Addressable Market (TAM)
It helps to measure the revenue opportunity available for a particular product or a service. If you are thinking to startup, don’t miss out on this criterion as this will help you to get an idea of your future prospects.

Annual Run Rate
Run Rate refers to the financial performance of your company based on current projections which acts as a predictor of future performance. It often says that the current condition may continue. It is extremely helpful in understanding how likely you are to hit your forecasts and capture latest market trends. It also helps to measure the performance of segments that are running within your startup for shorter periods of time.

Gross Margin
Gross margins are a measure of your operating profitability which gives the difference between revenue and cost of goods sold. Gross margin is an important metrics to understand at what stage of the curve your business is in and also shows you how effective your management and team are at driving the business. It also helps you to know how much money from sales is left over which you can invest in operating expenses.

Sell-Through Rate
Sell through rate = Number of units sold in a period/ Number of items at the beginning of the period

The calculation of the period (usually one month) is useful when comparing the sale of a product against another, or when comparing the sell through of a specific product from one month to another.

Network Effects
It is a phenomenon where a service or product gains value when more people start using it. It tells you how well you are capturing the market and how well off you are compared to your competitors.

Virality
Viral coefficient measures the organic growth of your startup. A startup usually gets started by referring to friends and family. If they like the product, the word spreads out and your customer base increases. Other prominent ways are through social media, email invitations and so on. One way to improve viral coefficient is by building incentives into your product which urges an existing user to share their experience leading to more traffic.

It is calculated as: 

Viral coefficient = Average number of invitations sent existing user x conversion rate of invitation

Net Promoter Score
It is defined as a tool which gives you an idea of how likely your customer is to recommend your product/service to a friend. It is an important metric to understand customer’s expectations and satisfaction.

Platform Risk
If you are too much dependent on a specific platform through which you promote or sell your idea/product, it may become a risk in the long run. It is important to take care of diversity so that you don’t just reach a wider customer base but also mitigate risk.

Direct Traffic
Direct traffic is the number of visits that your site gets directly and not through any intermediary. Example: Social media or some other website. Although there is no foolproof way to measure direct traffic, you can get a fair idea by looking at the traffic of landing pages.

Organic Traffic
Organic traffic is the traffic that comes to your website as a result of unpaid search results, your network effect, brand awareness, website's SEO and insightful contents for your target customers, As a founder, your aim should be  improving your SEO by setting practical goals and sharp content strategy.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

This startup wants to replace the silicon in your smartphone with diamonds

Chances are you’ve never heard of Akhan Semiconductor, but the company is well on its way to producing the hardware at the heart of your next smartphone, smartwatch, laptop, or virtual reality headset. The new components won’t only last longer and perform better than today’s tech, but their environmental impact will be much less severe, too. The big secret? Diamonds.
Instead of making processing chips out of silicon, Akhan is using jewelry’s favorite gem stone.
Why make processors out of diamonds?
Diamonds, it turns out, aren’t just the hardest mineral on the Mohs scale. They have a knack for transferring heat, and do a much better job of retaining energy compared to the silicon in most of today’s electronics. The minerals, on average, can run five times hotter and eliminate up to 90 percent of energy typically loss in the course of electron transfer.
“We’re the only company in the world that can create [these diamonds],” Carl Shurbof, Akhan’s chief of operations, told Digital Trends, “and we’re uniquely positioned to to create a new ecosystem.”
“We can create a wearable that … is completely flexible and can easily wrap around your wrist.”
The applications are practically endless. For consumer devices like the smartphone in your pocket, diamond could drastically reduce the amount of heat it produces. A diamond-made smartphone would be cooler against your face when you’re chatting with a buddy, for one, but could also last substantially longer. High temperatures wear aggressively at electronics, meaning that any reduction in heat has the potential to boost their lifespan.
Your phone could be thinner, too, since it wouldn’t need the temperature-regulating heatsinks and fans of silicon models. And as an added bonus, it might be faster — the newfound thermal headroom would allow phone makers to bump up performance.
Perhaps even more incredibly, diamond-based electronics could be cheaper than their silicon counterparts, Shurboff said. That is, again, because manufacturers don’t have to worry about keeping the devices cool.
Related: Samsung’s first foldable phone, the Galaxy X, could launch in 2017
But smartphones aren’t the only devices that stand to benefit. Electric car manufacturers like Tesla are targeting circuitry efficiency improvements of around 18 percent, a goalpost Shurboff said Akhan’s diamonds could easily exceed. The diamonds are tailor-made for heavy manufacturing and aerospace firms, which often require materials strong enough to withstand extreme radiation like x-rays.
“It’s both elegant and extremely high tech,” Shurboff said.
Digging for diamonds
Adam Khan, Akhan’s founder and chief executive, conceived of the idea in 2007 when he began pursuing the commercialization of diamond-based electronics. Khan, a graduate of the University of Illinois at Chicago and Stanford University’s Fabrication Facility, is an electrical engineer by trade, so he sought to solve the two most imposing barriers to diamond mass production: deposition, the process of growing a layer of diamond on top a wafer-like base, and doping, or fine-tuning diamond’s electrical properties.
diamond processors take on silicon akhan semiconductor
Akhan Semiconductor
diamond processors take on silicon akhan semiconductor
Argonne National Laboratory

Khan got a leg up from colleagues, most notably scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory. Akhan inked intellectual property licensing agreements, which gave the company exclusive methods to create synthetic diamonds and use them to produce transistors, capacitors, and resistors — the components of modern-day computers.
Related: Forget one screen — two screens could be the future of the smartwatch
The lab’s research dovetailed with one of Khan’s early breakthroughs: diamonds that stuck securely to conductive metals. The novelty was in the binding process. Khan figured out a way to reliably affix metals and alloys to diamond wafers without impacting either material’s conductivity. That discovery set the final cogs in motion toward Akhan’s end game: semiconductors — the essential component of electric circuits — made of diamond. He received a U.S. patent for the work in 2012.
Not your typical diamonds
Akhan’s diamonds aren’t the cut you might find on a Harry Winston tiara. Instead, Akhan’s Chief of Operations Carl Shurboff told Digital Trends, they’re designed expressly to percolate electrons around the insides of gadgets.
“When you say ‘diamond,’ everyone thinks mine diamonds or blood diamonds,” he said. “The idea of a semiconducting diamond is difficult to convey to the general public.” Unlike the diamonds extracted from subterranean tunnels in Siberia and Zimbabwe, Akhan’s are man-made and manufactured with methane — “the most abundant molecule in the universe,” Shurboff notes, a fact that helps the company keep costs well within reason.

To produce them, Akhan uses microwaves to heat a reactor filled with hydrogen, argon, and the aforementioned methane. Once the cycle finishes, the methane reaches a plasma state, taking on the consistency and appearance of a super-hot gas. The result: thin sheets of diamond material about 1/70 the diameter of a human hair. That is where the future starts.
Transluscent, bendable devices
More exciting than a smartphone with diamond in it is what lies on the horizon: translucent, bendable diamond devices. Akhan is working on flexible diamond semiconductors that can bend a full 45 degrees in any direction, which Shurboff thinks would be a boon for smartwatches and fitness trackers.
“People who bought smartwatches and are interested in styling don’t like how bulky and ugly they are, and so they don’t wear them,” he said. “We can create a wearable technology that can be transposed to anything you want, is completely flexible, and can easily wrap around your wrist.”

The diamonds aren’t going to sprout up overnight, of course. Akhan’s starting small, combining its diamond tech with traditional silicon for a clientele that skews largely industrial. Its new Gurnee facility, the product of a $5.5 million incentives package from the state of Illinois, began shipping chips in the first quarter of 2016. It’ll begin producing consumer-ready, all-diamond models in about two years.
And when it does, Shurboff said the environmental impact will be negligible. The company claims that its diamond semiconductors require 20 percent less water to produce than silicon, and that the devices without heat sinks and fans made newly possible by its chips will cut down on the roughly 85-90 percent thermal materials that end up in landfills. While Akhan currently sources methane from third-party suppliers, Shurboff said one future source could be pollution like the kind produced by cars.
Related: This prototype shows how amazing flexible screens might be
“We’re working with high-caliber people and high-value partners,” he said. “It’s world-leading.”
It’ll be a while yet before Akhan gets a chip for the global semiconductor market, an industry worth an estimated $327 billion in 2016, but Shurboff is confident that diamonds will be a big competitor to silicon.
Also watch: Project Scorpio: Everything We Know | News and Rumors

Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/diamond-processors-take-on-silicon/#ixzz4EPDE8usD 

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e