Tag Archives: technical

The 2 Biggest Cybersecurity Fears of NASDAQ’s Chief Information Security Officer

NASDAQ CISO, Lou Modano, shares the big picture fears that businesses need to think about — even if they already have a great information-security program in place.
  
By Joseph Steinberg CEO, SecureMySocial   @JosephSteinberg

I recently spoke with Lou Modano, Chief Information Security Officer of NASDAQ, and asked him what his greatest fears are right now when it comes to keeping NASDAQ cyber-safe. Of course, there are many threats facing NASDAQ – from criminals to hacktivists to nation states – and the stock exchange obviously has an army of highly skilled information-security professionals, intensive information-security-related training, and a robust information-security technological infrastructure, so my question went beyond the usual technological and human issues, and, instead focused on what risks are hardest to correct even with significant cybersecurity resources. As such, CISO Modano's observations provide insight into the big-picture problems that businesses, cybersecurity professionals, and policymakers should be thinking about.

Modano told me that his two greatest concerns are:

1. The speed at which vulnerabilities are exploited to create cyber-weapons.
It is no secret that, in recent years, hackers have become much more adept at creating cyberweapons to exploit vulnerabilities, and that the time between the disclosure of a particular vulnerability and the creation of a weapon that exploits it has dramatically decreased. When vulnerabilities are found in software, the software makers typically issue patches – that is, fixes that can be downloaded and installed either automatically or manually. Modano pointed out, however, that the because the time between the issuance of a patch and the discovery of weapons that exploit the associated vulnerability in unpatched systems is going down, organizations wishing to stay secure often have a lot less time to deploy patches than they used to have in the past. Because a formal change management process including the testing of patches is needed in order to ensure that patches do not interfere with system functions or otherwise have adverse side effects, organizations face a growing risk of being unable to fully deploy patches before hackers start attacking unpatched systems or of deploying inadequately tested patches. While businesses can work to make their patching and change management process extremely efficient, even doing so does not fully solve the problem – especially in situations in which vulnerabilities are announced before patches are available, in which cases criminals often create cyber-weapons that exploit the vulnerabilities even before the associated patches are released by vendors. We may see an example of this in the near term if Wikileaks decides to publish details of CIA cyberweapons before the associated vulnerabilities are fixed by vendors, and folks have had adequate time to test and install the fixes; such an occurrence could force security-conscious organizations to temporarily disable various online services.

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Lesson: Make sure you have an efficient process for obtaining, testing, and deploying security fixes, and be aware of when you may be at risk even with such a process in place.

2. How does the information-security team know what it does not know?
As Sun Tzu pointed our thousands of years ago, it is much easier to defend against attacks when you know your enemy and its tactics. While security professionals do attempt to monitor hacker communication channels for indications of brewing attacks and exploits, one of the greatest problems that defenders face is that hackers are, by definition, one step ahead. Security pros face challenges in getting as much intelligence about what threats are coming – sometimes there are warnings from chatter or from information shared on social media, but sometimes defenders know nothing about a powerful attack before it is launched. Modano pointed out that industry groups and other methods of exchanging information do help – as one organization that detects something anomalous or hostile can share its findings with others both to warn them and to see if others have observed similar potential threats. Even firms that compete for business often recognize that when it comes to information security it is in their common interest to share information about threats that they discover – after all, if a criminal or nation state breaches one of the firms, he/she/it is likely to launch similar attacks against the others. At the same time, however, as Modano noted to me, there is a lack of standardization across federal and state regulators on matters related to privacy, information sharing, breach notification, and other areas of security; a lack of uniformity complicates matters related to knowledge sharing, as not all businesses are subject to same rules and requirements.

Lesson for us all: Make sure you obtain as much relevant intelligence as you can about threats to your business and personal information systems. Industry groups and information-security venues can be one good source of such knowledge.

For insights from other experts who attended the recent NASDAQ – National Cybersecurity Alliance Summit in New York, please see my article 6 Insights From Experts At The NASDAQ-NCSA CyberSecurity Summit.

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Nokia’s BACK With THREE Android Phones: No Flagship In Sight, Though…

Nokia's Back With Three Android Phones. Meet The Nokia 3, Nokia 5 and Nokia 6

Nokia returned to MWC 2017 with a bang, releasing three new Android phones – the Nokia 3, 5 and 6 – as well as the oft-rumoured Nokia 3310 reboot.

First and foremost: these Nokia Android phones are not flagship-grade phones. They’re not designed to compete with Apple or Samsung at the top of the market; no, these handsets have a decidedly mid-range feel to them which is reflected in how they’ve been priced.

The handsets go up in price and specs as you move through the numbers; the Nokia 3 is the base model and is also the cheapest, whereas the Nokia 6 is the most potent and costly – though its still retailing under $250.

And if you're in the UK, you can pre-order any of these Nokia handsets from Carphone Warehouse right now. 

Nokia 3 Specs

Operating system Android 7.0 Nougat
CPU: MTK 6737, Quad-core 1.3Ghz
RAM: 2 GB
DISPLAY: 5.0” IPS LCD (1280 x 720, 16:9)
Camera: 8MP AF, 1.12um, f/2, LED flash; (front) 8MP AF, 1.12um, f/2, FOV 84 degrees, display flash
Battery: 2650 mAh
Storage: 16GB 
MicroSD: Yep – up to 128GB
This is Nokia’s entry level model. It should cost around $150 and is clearly aimed at the budget-end of the smartphone market, a very lucrative segment for players like Samsung, Huawei and, once again, Nokia.

The Nokia 3 features pure Android Nougat; no custom skin, no bloatware. That’s a huge plus for users, so hat’s off to Nokia for that one. Inside you have moderate specs as well as support for MicroSD cards.

This handset is an affordable option, and that’s reflected in the specs. But given the attention to detail, the nice, overall design and the decent specs we can see a lot of budget-conscious users flocking to this handset.

Nokia 5 Specs

OS: Android Nougat
CPU: Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 430 mobile platform
RAM: 2GB
Display: 5.2” IPS LCD 1280 x 720, 16:9
Camera: 13MP PDAF, 1.12um, f/2, dual tone flash; (front) 8MP AF, 1.12um, f/2, FOV 84 degrees
Battery: 3000 mAh
Storage: 16GB 
MicroSD: Yep – up to 128GB
The Nokia 5 is slightly more potent. It has better specs, a more refined design and a better camera.

It’s still a mid-range handset through and through, though it does provide way more bang for your buck than the Nokia 3.

The camera sounds decent. Ditto battery life. Again, Android will run in pure stock configuration with minimal bloatware. The display is full HD and you have a decent CPU in the form of Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 430.

The Nokia 5 will retail for around $200 once it becomes available later on this year.

Nokia 6 Specs

OS: Android Nougat
CPU: Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 430 mobile platform
RAM: 3GB
Display: 5.5” IPS LCD 1080p
Camera: 16MP PDAF, 1.0um, f/2, dual tone flash; (front) 8MP AF, 1.12um, f/2, FOV 84 degrees
Battery: 3000 mAh
Storage: 64GB/126GB 
MicroSD: Yep – up to 128GB
The Nokia 6 is the MAC DADDY for the time being, and it certainly looks the part as well. The handset features a gorgeous aluminium body, decent specs and a very appealing price tag of around $250.

Again, this isn’t a flagship handset – that phone, currently referred to as the Nokia P1 will likely launch at a later date – but it should be very competitive given its specs and operating system.

I do like what Nokia is doing here, though. It’s not coming in and trying to take on Apple and Samsung. Instead, it’s targeting the mid-to-low-end of the space, the space where handsets like the Moto G5 operate, in order to get some quick wins before rising up later on in 2017 to take on the big boys with the Nokia P1.

Click here to pre-order any of these Nokia handsets from Carphone Warehouse.     https://www.carphonewarehouse.com/nokia/pre-registration.html?awc=2264_1490087710_0ceb187f081bd0e448ad57ce6971d338&cid=Affiliate_Editorial+Content_78888

 

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Is Your Current JOB Replaceable by a ROBOT in the Next 5 Years?

It’s a vital question. Take a moment and think over it!!! As per a report by the University of Oxford, 47% of Jobs in US, 35% in UK and a whopping 77% in China are estimated to get automated. A quest arises, are we moving towards a ‘workerless’ world? The World is headed towards a more precision and error free operations whilst slipping into chaos day by day. Making sense of the world we live in is a tough task but the most we can do is safeguard our futures individually. We are seeing a rise in Self-Employment, Free Lancers and Entrepreneurship over the last decade. But how competent and sustainable will it be when the world gets even more fierce in terms of competition? A Small piece of pie will be chased by many. We need to brace ourselves for this coming time.

People in their 20s and 30s will be the most affected because of Automation. It is set to have a cascading effect on multiple industries and support functions displacing millions from jobs. Though Computers and Robots will make work processes more accurate and easy they will need highly skilled workforce to manage them. Constant skill upgradation embracing new systems and technologies will be needed by the future workforce. The element of ‘Human’ factor will slowly minimize making humans go crazy over machines and technology. It’s an uncertain world we are headed for which will have no place for low-skilled and semi-skilled workforce which make up a substantial chunk of the economy. Many say that Computers will enhance the existing work operations thereby assisting or complimenting the human ‘Brain’ and thought processes and therefore Automation should not be painted with a grey picture.

 

But have we thought of the millions of low-skilled and semi-skilled workforces which anyway will get displaced and the effect on the subsequent families associated with them. China, the world’s manufacturing hub is headed towards rising joblessness index as automation is slowly setting in. Foxconn, the manufacturer of iPhones recently replaced 60000 of its workforce with Automation Robots. Just as the world saw a gradual phase out of Tellers at Banks because of ATM’s, aggregations and app based functions will bring disruptions in industries. How do we govern and regulate all this? We are soon approaching a stage where development is crossing that threshold of sustainable development to destructive automation which has no place for Human Emotions and Human Factor. We who have created it are becoming victims of our own creation.  Transportation and Commutation is witnessing a revolution through 'Driver-Less Cars and Drones'. Uber, the world's leading Cab aggregator is set to test Driver-less cars in its network.

Populous countries like India and China are seeing mass displacement of people caused due to the sudden spurt in technology. Demographics of such nations are seeing a dramatic change and shift in lifestyles. India carried out a Demonetisation drive in the last quarter of 2016 wiping out 85% of Cash from the system's economy thereby encouraging the population to adopt Digital Payment Systems and Banking Channels. It was alarming to see the chaos and unrest across the length and breadth of the country throwing most of the people into a frenzy. The picture is slowly transforming now. People have realised the need to adapt Digital payments and Banking channels. 

We cannot stop automation from invading our daily lives but we surely must take steps to make the current and next generation adaptable to the new world. Millennials who are currently working in the Telemarketing, Insurance, Banking, Manufacturing, Transportation, Retail and Construction profiles need to start preparing themselves actively for the automated world which will soon knock on their doors. The question will surely arise as to what exactly can be done when the future seems so grim? In the words of Google Chairman Eric Schmidt, the future world will be more of individualistic profiles competing against each other. Physical presence will matter no more but a virtual presence and virtual image on the 15-inch mobile device we carry will bear immense importance.

At Asterizk, we interact on a regular basis with Technology, Government and Industry Leaders through our think tank sessions which has really enabled us to bridge that gap and create programs and services customized to help working professionals brace for the Automated world. Interacting with individuals, youngsters, free lancers, self-employed professionals, college graduates to Senior Management officials has really made us realize and wonder over the power of human potential. There will be a need for human touch and human interference even in the automated world. We just need to strike the right balance to make sense of the world of automation.

At Asterizk, we are taking steps to amalgamate the smallest factor of working force with the automated world to make Automation more meaningful for all the sections of the society. We are taking steps to make every low skilled and semi-skilled individual realize his value, build upon his value and make him ready for the automated world. It’s an uphill task but when we have a collective desire to make a difference and bring about a change even the impossible seems possible.

To know more, You may follow Asterizk on Linkedin and Twitter

Harshal Bhalerao – Follow the Author on Twitter and Linkedin for more updates

Co-Founder and Director

ASTERIZK is a leading Business Intelligence and Resource Development Company Conceptualised, Strategized and Incorporated to service the Corporate Learning, Knowledge Management, Business Intelligence, Personal Branding and Networking Work Space. 

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Your internet speeds will be insanely fast when 5G arrives

When the 5G wireless standard hits the mainstream, our home internet speeds have the potential to be so fast that we'll be downloading 4K movies, games, software, and any other large form of content at a fraction of the time we're used to.

5G is the upcoming evolution of wireless 4G LTE, which is mostly used today for wireless mobile networks. It'll offer incredibly fast wireless communication that can be used for a number of applications outside of mobile networks, one of which is home internet.

At Mobile World Congress this year, Samsung showcased its 5G Home Routers, which achieved speeds of up to 4 gigabits-per-second (Gbps), according to PCMag. That's 500 megabytes-per-second, which could let you download a 50GB game in under two minutes, or a 100GB 4K movie in under four minutes.

To give you an idea of how fast that is, the average internet speed in the US as of 2016 is 55 megabits-per-second, which translates to a woeful 6.5 megabytes-per-second.

As PCMag's Sascha Segan points out, however, Samsung's router was right next to the transmitting 5G cell at the time of the demonstration. That means those speeds are probably only possible in a perfect scenario, where the 5G router is extremely close to the 5G radio cell without any interference, obstacles, or network congestion.

Still, even with 50% of that performance, we could be experiencing 2Gbps speeds at home. And even 1Gbps — 25% of the perfect scenario — would be great compared the US internet speed average.

Gigabit internet speeds aren't new, but they're extremely rare to come by. There are just a handful of ISPs that offer Gigabit Internet in just a few parts of the US, largely because it's incredibly expensive to lay down infrastructure. It involves digging up roads to install miles of fiber optic cables and connecting them to your specific address.

The best part about wireless 5G millimeter waves is that ISPs don't have to build costly infrastructure to deliver those insanely fast speeds. Instead, your internet service will be delivered wirelessly through the air, much like your mobile network for your phone.

How does it work?
Samsung's 5G Home Router will use an antenna installed outside of one of your home's windows, which is connected to a WiFi router inside your home. That antenna will pick up one of 5G's "millimeter wave" wireless signals that are transmitted from millimeter wave cell towers.

We've actually seen this technology before from a startup called Starry, which is currently in the testing phase in Boston. 

Hurry up and wait.
You can't buy it yet, but the technology is here, and now it's a matter of when this 5G millimeter wave technology will become mainstream. 

We're essentially waiting for ISPs to begin rolling out 5G. At the moment, Verizon is testing 5G in a few parts of the US, and the the overall consensus for mainstream 5G is around 2020.

There's no indication of how much these routers and other equipment will cost, nor how much the internet plans will cost, either. You can get a 500Mbps plan from Verizon Fios at the moment, but that costs $275 per month. 

Here's to hoping Gigabit 5G Internet will be cheaper.

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The iPhone 8’s most important new feature was finally just confirmed

The iPhone 8 will be Apple’s new flagship smartphone this year, introducing a variety of features that have never been seen on an iPhone before. The most important new iPhone 8 feature concerns the display. Not only will the screen size increase, but the iPhone 8 will be the first phone to have an OLED display. Apple will likely not confirm the feature until it’s ready to announce the handset in September, but the company’s suppliers aren’t always so tight-lipped.

 

Don't Miss: World’s top Apple insider just revealed a new iPhone 8 feature that’s a literal game-changer

Talking to reporters at a general meeting of the Korea Display Industry Association, LG Display CEO Han Sang-beom said that demand for LCD screens will remain steady in the next couple of years, in spite of Apple’s move to OLED.

“Apple wouldn’t switch 100 percent to OLED for the time being,” Han told The Investor. “Considering Apple’s annual shipments at about 220 to 330 million iPhones, the plastic OLED would not become the only display type for the new iPhone as well.”

Han essentially confirmed that Apple is indeed going to adopt OLED displays as soon as this year, a move that will hurt LG Display in the near future. Samsung Display is said to be the exclusive OLED screen provider for the iPhone 8, but rivals including LG Display, Japan Display, and BOE are all investing heavily in OLED plants.

Han said that mass-production of smartphone OLED screens will start in the second half of the year.

The Investor notes that the iPhone 8 could make up almost 30% of total iPhone sales this year, with Apple expected to launch three distinct flagship iPhone models in 2017. Most rumors detailing Apple’s iPhone plans for 2017 agree that Apple will have three brand-new iPhones in stores this fall, the iPhone 8, iPhone 7s and iPhone 7s Plus.

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Oculus could cost Facebook up to $11 billion, but it might be worth it

In 2014, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg spent $2 billion to purchase the virtual reality startup Oculus and its Rift headset. The deal was huge, not just from a price standpoint, but because it was proof of momentum behind the nascent VR industry.

Nearly three years later, though, it looks like that $2 billion was just a down payment for the VR company, as Facebook will likely have to shell out billions more until the social network can get the Oculus’ technology to a point where Zuckerberg and co. are satisfied.

The Facebook founder said as much while on the witness stand for a lawsuit that accuses Oculus of stealing some of its VR technology from video game company ZeniMax Media, according to The New York Times.

From $2 billion to $11 billion

That initial $2 billion payment for Oculus wasn’t even the entire amount Facebook paid for the company. The social networking giant also paid $700 million to keep certain Oculus employees and promised an additional $300 million if the company met specific milestones, according to the report.

On top of that, Zuckerberg said Facebook might have to dump an additional $3 billion into Oculus to shore up its technology.

Why commit to spending nearly $7 billion — plus an extra $2 billion if Oculus loses its lawsuit — on a technology that has yet to blow up in the consumer market? Well, because Zuckerberg is looking beyond VR in the traditional sense. See, where the Rift, HTC’s Vive and Sony’s PlayStation VR are primarily designed as gaming systems, the Facebook founder has his sights on making virtual reality a more social experience.

During the Oculus Connect 3 conference in October, Zuckerberg took the stage to show off a kind of virtual/augmented reality system the company was working on. In the demo Zuckerberg showed how he, through a digital avatar, could interact with friends and family in real time in a digital space as if they were all in the same room.

Price is still a barrier

It’s an interesting gambit, but it’s still far from complete. What’s more, the cost of VR systems like the Rift is still prohibitively high for many consumers. The company is working to bring prices down, though.

For instance, when Oculus launched the Rift in 2016, you needed to purchase a $1,000 to $1,500 PC to run the headset, plus another $600 for the device itself. Since then, the company has worked to ensure the Rift can run on systems that cost as little as $500. Still, at $1,100 for the whole setup, the Rift isn’t exactly cheap.

HTC’s Vive costs $800 and still requires a powerful PC, while Sony’s PSVR costs $400 and only works with that company’s PlayStation 4 console. Sure, gaming enthusiasts might not have a problem spending that kind of cash on a top-notch gaming experience, but none of these headsets is quite there yet. There’s no “killer app” for high-end VR systems.

The most successful headsets, so far at least, have been Samsung’s Gear VR, which costs $100 plus the price of a compatible Samsung smartphone, and Google’s Cardboard, which costs $15 in addition to the cost of a smartphone.

Zuckerberg’s big bet

Zuckerberg is obviously keenly aware of the importance of mobile platforms — the majority of Facebook’s traffic comes from mobile users and that will only continue to grow. Which is why Facebook split Oculus into two divisions, one primarily focused on PC-style VR and the other focused on mobile VR.

The hope is that Facebook and Oculus will be able to create a system impressive enough for all consumers to want to use. How long will it take for the company to get there? If Zuckerberg’s prediction on the stand holds up, it could take anywhere from 5 to 10 years.

Still, Oculus will be in an enviable position if Zuckerberg’s prognostications prove correct. That’s because the Facebook CEO sees gaming as just the tip of the VR iceberg. In its ultimate form, Zuckerberg sees virtual reality as a means to share experiences with others in real time and feel as though you’re actually there.

In a July interview with Bloomberg, Zuckerberg explained how virtual reality is the natural progression from sharing experiences via video, just as video was the natural progression of sharing experiences via photos. VR, then, will almost literally allow us to stand in another person’s shoes as they explore the world.

And with Facebook’s enormous audience — it has roughly 1.8 billion monthly active users, already sharing everything from selfies to wedding videos — the social network is just about the only company that can help push VR forward as a means to connect the masses. If that all works out, and Facebook becomes the VR company just as it is the social network, the billions Zuckerberg spent on Oculus will surely have been worth it.

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ZTE wants you to design its next product with Project CSX

What will the next greatest mobile product be?”

It’s the question on every tech lover’s lips, and up-and-coming Chinese company ZTE wants to answer that question in a highly unusual way. The company is crowdsourcing ideas for its next mobile project from the internet and has committed to building and selling that product once a winner has been chosen.

ZTE’s Vice President of Technology Planning and Partnerships Jeff Yee is the core driving force behind Project CSX, ZTE’s mission to give the mobile-buying public what they want by asking them to formulate a product idea, and then design it from the ground up. CSX stands for Crowd Sourced X, and the X symbolises the mystery behind the final product, which will be decided by a competition. Once the votes have been cast and the winner selected, ZTE will build and sell the winning product.

That’s right. If you’ve got an idea for a mobile product that’s feasible right now — not one with three processors, a roll-up screen, and five-month battery life — here’s your chance to tell a company that not only wants to listen, but will actually make the device if it’s good enough and technically feasible. It’s Kickstarter without the risk, and the opportunity to genuinely influence the direction of a mobile company, and potentially the industry itself. Really.

This is how a new product usually comes to life: ZTE gets an idea, designers come up with mockups that are agreed on, and the device goes into production for consumers to buy. Project CSX turns this on its head. “No company has flipped the process before,” said Yee, continuing, “Now it’s customers coming up with the idea, and engineers will work with them on design.”

Still time to get involved

Project CSX is already underway, and the first product ideas have been selected from the more than 400 submissions in total, ready for people to come up with a concept design. The three product ideas that need a concept design are:

A system to minimize physical interaction with a phone using eye tracking, or a polymer case to stick the device to various surfaces.
A wearable device that makes learning a skill easier and more fun. For example, a glove that teaches you to play the guitar through guided finger movement.
More waterproof gadgets, such as a submersible VR headset to turn a pool into the Great Barrier Reef.
ZTE wants to see what’s called a six-view breakdown — a design term for an image showing the product from six different angles. There needs to be a story attached to the features so the benefits are easy to sell, you’ll need to consider where to place components, what materials are used for the construction, the dimensions, and even an app or device user interface if one is necessary.

Creativity and fun come first, and ZTE will guide you through the rest.
You don’t have to be an engineer, be able to use Powerpoint or CAD design programs, or know how to code. You can sketch out the product, take inspiration for the materials in the world around you, and get the app’s flow down perfectly without doing anything other than picking up a sketchpad. You may need years of experience to do this professionally, but that’s not true here. Creativity and fun come first, and ZTE will guide you through the rest.

If you missed out on the opportunity to submit your product idea and already have a concept design for it, ZTE’s going to put a wildcard of its own choosing alongside the three Project CSX finalists, so you still have time to get involved and pitch your idea. You’ll have to be quick though, as the window closes on September 30.

ZTE wants to make something new

Project CSX’s winner will be announced after a series of votes ending on October 19, and the final product will be revealed at the CES tech show at the beginning of 2017. The sale date is the only factor that’s currently variable because it will depend on which product wins. The unusual project is already changing the mentality at ZTE.

“The engineers love it,” Yee told Digital Trends, adding that it was the interaction between all teams that he enjoyed the most. “It’s really listening to the customer,” about products rather than just relying on a focus group to fine-tune an internal idea.

One of the few rules in Project CSX is that it must be a mobile device. However, mobile could mean many different things.

“I want to have a challenge. Something innovative that doesn’t already exist,” Yee enthused.

ZTE’s Senior Director of Mobile Devices Waiman Lam had earlier told us he was hoping for something exciting that may use virtual reality or augmented reality. It’s obvious the company really wants Project CSX to birth something exciting, interesting, and innovative.

At the moment it’s only ZTE behind Project CSX, but it has attracted the attention of T-Mobile — a network that’s never afraid to push the industry in a new direction — which apparently “loves the idea,” and may want to work on a similar project in the future. For now, though, you could shape the future of mobile with ZTE.

ZTE is on a roll

Project CSX could go either way. The result may be hugely exciting or terribly lame, but there’s no arguing that ZTE’s current range of phones is extremely tempting. Last year, there were many different Axon phones made for different regions, with different specs. This year there are two — the super Axon 7 and its newly announced, Digital Trends’ award-winning counterpart, the Axon 7 Mini. Both phones represent superb value for your money, have strong spec sheets, some interesting differentiating features, and a delectable design.

Related: The Nubia Z11 will launch internationally later this year

It’s a big shift from the confusion of last year, in which there were dozens of Axon phones with little to no differences between them. While maturity plays a part in this shift, ZTE has likely been looking at two of its biggest competitors, Huawei and OnePlus, for inspiration. The Axon 7 challenges the OnePlus 3 on price and specs, and comes very close to matching the considerably more expensive Huawei P9 in outright sleek design.

ZTE’s Waiman Lam told Digital Trends that the only reason it can beat companies like Huawei on price is that it doesn’t throw outrageous phone launches and multiple press events.

We really don’t think it’s a coincidence that this newly streamlined company has not only introduced the Axon 7, easily the best phone it has ever made, but is also running a truly fascinating competition that could end up introducing an entirely new mobile product that we’d have otherwise never seen.

The potential, drive, and ambition were always there for ZTE, but it’s all coming together in 2016, and the company has done everything right so far. We’re going to be watching Project CSX and ZTE very closely over the next year, and suggest you do the same.

If you want to enter Project CSX, visit the dedicated website here.

Also watch: Huawei MediaPad M3 Hands On  Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile

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