Schlagwort-Archive: why

Why Verizon is losing more cellphone customers than ever

By Brian Fung April 20 
 
Verizon reported a profit and revenue miss in their first quarter, as well as a loss of subscribers despite re-launching unlimited data plans. (Reuters)
For the first time, the nation's largest wireless provider is losing customers faster than it can replace them.

It's a major milestone for Verizon, which on Thursday reported a net decline of 289,000 cellphone subscribers over the past four months.

Even though Verizon usually loses some cellular customers every quarter, it has historically lured enough back to be able to report growth in that part of its business. But recent months have seen hundreds of thousands of customers defect to competitors such as T-Mobile and Sprint, analysts say.

Things could have been even worse if Verizon hadn't suddenly reintroduced unlimited data plans in February, according to Verizon's earnings numbers. In the first six weeks of the year, Verizon lost nearly 400,000 wireless customers, according to its latest earnings report. But once the new plans became available, they helped blunt those losses by bringing in about 110,000 new subscribers, Verizon said.

Verizon's reluctance to bring back unlimited data and its sudden about-face this year reflect rising competition in the cellular industry that is forcing large incumbents to adapt. The telecom giant has long argued that consumers are willing to pay a premium for a quality wireless experience, in contrast to budget carriers such as Sprint.

[The government just wrapped a major auction that'll shape the future of the Internet]

But aggressive moves by smaller carriers to build out their networks are paying off, said Roger Entner, an industry analyst with Recon Analytics, meaning that such companies as T-Mobile are chipping away at Verizon's network advantage. In a recent federal auction of wireless airwaves, T-Mobile emerged as a major beneficiary, spending $8 billion to acquire rights to radio spectrum it will use to expand its mobile Internet capacity.

“At least three of the four nationwide carriers [are] inching closer to network parity in the major markets,” Entner said.

In addition, fewer customers are choosing to leave the smaller carriers for Verizon or AT&T, Entner said. This is important because in a market such as the United States, there aren't many new customers left; most people already have cell service, and as a result, carriers have been forced to engage in costly price wars to poach subscribers from one another. These duels have led to escalating promotions and competing terms of service that reduce corporate margins — to the benefit of consumer.

The cutthroat wireless market has prompted cellphone carriers to look to other industries for expansion. Hoping to make money by mining and selling customer data, Verizon has moved to purchase AOL and Yahoo for billions of dollars. By the same token, AT&T purchased DirecTV and is seeking regulatory approval for its acquisition of Time Warner.

In this strategy, wireless companies could raise their revenue by selling more services, such as television and Internet bundles; mining Internet users' behavioral data to sell targeted ads; or selling that data to other marketers.

Verizon’s losses underscore the urgency with which the company must make that evolution as it seeks to diversify beyond its traditional role as a provider of connectivity, said Jeff Kagan, an independent telecom analyst.

"This change in the marketplace is a threat to both Verizon and AT&T," he said

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What is Palm Sunday All About? Why did Jesus need to enter Jerusalem in the way he did?

Why did Jesus need to enter Jerusalem in the way he did?

Written by GodLife on 04/04/2017
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Prophecy, Promises, Resurrection, Faith, Love
At first, Jesus' disciples did not understand. But after he had been given his glory, they remembered all this. Everything had happened exactly as the Scriptures said it would.

John 12:16
On Palm Sunday you may be given a palm branch. If you’re a new follower of Jesus, this could be a surprise. Even if you’ve been a Christian for a long time, you may not be clear about why we celebrate this day or why it’s called Jesus’ “Triumphal Entry.” Palm Sunday is a breathtaking picture of the patience, the faithfulness and the loving heart of our Savior.

Keep reading for the secret of what Palm Sunday is about.

Palm Sunday is about timing
Many times, people in the Gospels get excited about Jesus: His teaching, (See Mark 1:21-22; John 7:46) His healing, or miracles. (John 2:23-25) Jesus didn’t let these people make Him a king (John 6:15) or arrest Him before He was ready. He often says "My time hasn’t yet come." (John 7:6)

Why was timing so important? An ancient prophecy in Daniel predicted this event’s very day:

“from the command to rebuild Jerusalem until the coming of the Chosen Leader, it will be seven weeks ("sevens") and another sixty-two weeks ("sevens"). (Daniel 9:25)

The command predicted by Daniel was issued by the Persian King Artaxerxes in Nehemiah 2:1-8. Nehemiah writes:

“‘I will need timber to rebuild the gates of the fortress near the temple and more timber to construct the city wall… I would appreciate a letter to Asaph, who is in charge of the royal forest.’ God was good to me, and the king did everything I asked.” (Nehemiah 2:8)

Exactly 483 years (69 "sevens") later, Jesus began His donkey ride into Jerusalem, fulfilling the prophecy!

Palm Sunday was about keeping an ancient promise
Why is it that Jesus was no longer resisting and actually offering Himself as King?

“Jesus found a donkey and rode on it, just as the Scriptures say, ‘People of Jerusalem, don’t be afraid! Your King is now coming, and he is riding on a donkey.’” (John 12:14-15)

Without knowing that promise (from Zechariah 9:9), it would not be obvious what Jesus was doing. Did the people of His day understand? Read their reactions:

“They put some of their clothes on its back, and Jesus got on. Many people spread clothes on the road, while others went to cut branches from the fields. In front of Jesus and behind him, people went along shouting, ‘Hooray! God bless the one who comes in the name of the Lord! God bless the coming kingdom of our ancestor David. Hooray for God in heaven above!’” (Mark 11:7-10)

They showed they knew what Jesus was doing when they hailed him as a king and shouted for him to save them, quoting from Psalm 118:19-27. (See also Isaiah 62:10-11)

The Pharisees showed they knew (and were bothered) that the people understood when they said:

“Teacher, make your disciples stop shouting!” But Jesus answered, “If they keep quiet, these stones will start shouting.” (Luke 19:39-40)

Palm Sunday was about making an effort to reconcile the people to their God
A large crowd had come for Passover (John 12:12) and many (Matthew 21:8) participated. Everyone in the city “was excited and asked, ‘Who can this be?’” (Matthew 21:10) Had Jesus’ day of acceptance finally arrived? No; we know that instead of an inauguration, a crucifixion was awaiting Jesus. What happened? Psalm 118 had predicted this as well:

“The stone that the builders tossed aside has now become the most important stone.” (Psalm 118:22)

The people were swayed by the religious leaders. (Mark 15:11-15) This was written in advance also. Jesus even explained this to them: “they knew that Jesus was talking about them.” (Matthew 21:33-45)

Just because Jesus knew all along what would happen does not mean He was not affected.

“When Jesus came closer and could see Jerusalem, he cried and said: ‘It is too bad that today your people don’t know what will bring them peace! Now it is hidden from them… This will happen because you did not see that God had come to save you.’” (Luke 19:41-44)

Palm Sunday is only a preview of what is coming. Next week we will celebrate Jesus’ resurrection! His death for our sins and resurrection is the only way we can be acceptable to God. (Romans 4:25) The next time Jesus returns will be as “King of Kings and Lord of Lords” (Revelation 19:16) At that time His coming will not be with meekness but “with his powerful angels and with a flaming fire. Our Lord Jesus will punish anyone who doesn’t know God and won’t obey His message. Their punishment will be eternal destruction, and they will be kept far from the presence of our Lord and his glorious strength.” (2 Thessalonians 1:7-10)

Jesus’ coming was not just to save the people of His day. God came to save you. Have you received Him as your King?

Pray this week:

Jesus, I thank You for your timing, Your faithfulness and Your love. It’s only based on Your work that I am acceptable to God. You are my King, and you have the right to order my life!

Many times, surprising things in the Bible turn out to be wonderful promises being kept by God.

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Why Suicide is Not an Option

Why suicide is the ultimate denial to God

Written by GodLife on 16/08/2016
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Betrayal, Depression, Failure, Hope, Purpose, Suicide
Then Judas threw the silver coins down in the Temple and went out and hanged himself.

Matthew 27:5
Life can sometimes feel hopeless. Maybe you are going through the death of a loved one, a permanent disability, failure or betrayal. You’re not alone.

Do not choose Judas’ path of ending his own life with suicide. Instead, read on to see how some of God’s people have responded to these feelings rather than suicide:

1.Betrayal: David
David, the “man after God’s own heart,” was running away from King Saul, whom he had served. He fled to Israel’s enemies and they betrayed him, taking his family captive. Even David’s trusted followers began to turn on him: “David, too, was in anguish. Some of his men talked about stoning him because they were so bitter about their families being taken.” Who else was left at this point? “But David took comfort in the Eternal One, his True God” (1 Samuel 30:6). With God, David had stood against impossible odds before. (See 1 Samuel 17)

2. Loss: Job
Because of the devil’s attack, Job lost everything: his riches, his family… even his health. “Why does God let me live when life is miserable and so bitter? I keep longing for death more than I would seek a valuable treasure. Nothing could make me happier than to be in the grave.” (Job 3:20-22). It’s hard to imagine Job’s suffering. But he came to realize how unwise these words had been: “I have said things that I did not understand, things too great for me, which I did not know.” (Job 42:3)

3. Hopelessness: Paul
Paul was the fearless missionary (Acts 21:13) who sang in prison (Acts 16:25) and wrote part of the New Testament. He once admitted, “We were crushed and overwhelmed beyond our ability to endure, and we thought we would never live through it” (2 Corinthians 1:8).

More understanding may not change how you feel, but don’t trust your emotions. For a child of God, life is never hopeless. How can you really say you trust God with your eternity if you don't trust Him now? All of these men suffered greatly, but God had a greater plan for their lives on earth which they fulfilled. Please read 2 Corinthians 4:1 through 6:1. This is where Paul reveals this plan, and how it includes you

Pray this week:

Oh, God, I may be hurting so much right now, but I commit to trusting you no matter what. Your love for me is so great that you suffered worse for me. You have total knowledge and power. Your plan for my life is bigger than what I am going through, so I believe you will bring me through it.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

Why Do We Read the Bible?

You might hear the Bible referred to as “the Word of God,” “Scripture,” or “God’s Word.” But why did God use this book to share His story — and why should you care?

Written by Hope on 09/11/2014
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Bible
“Your Word is a lamp to guide my feet and a light for my path.” Psalm 119:105

When you are learning about Jesus Christ and about becoming His follower, Christians will suggest that you read the Bible. You might hear the Bible referred to as “the Word of God,” “Scripture,” or “God’s Word.” But why did God use this book to share His story — and why should you care?

What Is The Bible?
Thousands of years ago, God began revealing His plan to people on Earth. When people responded in “faith” (Genesis 15:6), God led them and taught them His ways. The Bible tells us Who God is, as God “revealed [His plan] to His holy apostles and prophets” (Ephesians 3:5). These plans were written in laws and holy letters. God also inspired His followers to record the great things He did in their lives, and to write about what He’s like. That means the Bible is not one message; it is a collection of God’s messages through much of human history.

The Bible Guides Your Life
God gave these messages to communicate His love and plan to save all people. God’s message changes lives. The Apostle Paul described God’s Scripture as “inspired by God, useful to teach us what is true and to make us realize what is wrong in our lives. It corrects us when we are wrong and teaches us to do what is right” (2 Timothy 3:16). Being familiar with the Bible helps you learn to trust God’s Holy Spirit, rather than yourself, so “that you may be thoroughly equipped for every good work” (2 Timothy 3:17) which God calls you to.

Power From God’s Word
Jesus quoted, “‘People do not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from God’” (Matthew 4:4). Just as our physical bodies gain energy from daily meals, so our spiritual lives gain power from daily intake of God’s Word. God will bring to mind what you’ve read and help you overcome evil in your life. This helps you trust God for the life to come. Learn how to accept Christ so you can have power from His word today.

Pray this week:

That God will reveal His will and help you grow through His Word.

The Bible is God's love letter to you… have you read the words from your Beloved Savior today?

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Why suicide is the ultimate denial to God

Why Suicide is Not an Option
Why suicide is the ultimate denial to God

Written by GodLife on 16/08/2016
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Suicide, Depression, Failure, Betrayal, Hope, Purpose
Then Judas threw the silver coins down in the Temple and went out and hanged himself.

Matthew 27:5
Life can sometimes feel hopeless. Maybe you are going through the death of a loved one, a permanent disability, failure or betrayal. You’re not alone.

Do not choose Judas’ path of ending his own life with suicide. Instead, read on to see how some of God’s people have responded to these feelings rather than suicide:

1.Betrayal: David
David, the “man after God’s own heart,” was running away from King Saul, whom he had served. He fled to Israel’s enemies and they betrayed him, taking his family captive. Even David’s trusted followers began to turn on him: “David, too, was in anguish. Some of his men talked about stoning him because they were so bitter about their families being taken.” Who else was left at this point? “But David took comfort in the Eternal One, his True God” (1 Samuel 30:6). With God, David had stood against impossible odds before. (See 1 Samuel 17)

2. Loss: Job
Because of the devil’s attack, Job lost everything: his riches, his family… even his health. “Why does God let me live when life is miserable and so bitter? I keep longing for death more than I would seek a valuable treasure. Nothing could make me happier than to be in the grave.” (Job 3:20-22). It’s hard to imagine Job’s suffering. But he came to realize how unwise these words had been: “I have said things that I did not understand, things too great for me, which I did not know.” (Job 42:3)

3. Hopelessness: Paul
Paul was the fearless missionary (Acts 21:13) who sang in prison (Acts 16:25) and wrote part of the New Testament. He once admitted, “We were crushed and overwhelmed beyond our ability to endure, and we thought we would never live through it” (2 Corinthians 1:8).

More understanding may not change how you feel, but don’t trust your emotions. For a child of God, life is never hopeless. How can you really say you trust God with your eternity if you don't trust Him now? All of these men suffered greatly, but God had a greater plan for their lives on earth which they fulfilled. Please read 2 Corinthians 4:1 through 6:1. This is where Paul reveals this plan, and how it includes you

Pray this week:

Oh, God, I may be hurting so much right now, but I commit to trusting you no matter what. Your love for me is so great that you suffered worse for me. You have total knowledge and power. Your plan for my life is bigger than what I am going through, so I believe you will bring me through it.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e

So, why is forgiveness – like Wanda showed her father – so important?

Forgiveness is the work of the courageous. There are many – from all walks of life – who testify to that and who state the importance of practicing it in our lives:

“For if you forgive men when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you.” – Jesus (Matthew 6:14)

“We must learn to forgive.” – Mother Theresa

“When you haven’t forgiven those who’ve hurt you, you turn your back against the future. When you do forgive, you start walking forward.” – Tyler Perry

“Forgiveness is God’s command.” – Martin Luther

“Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much.” – Oscar Wilde

So, why is forgiveness – like Wanda showed her father – so important?

Dr. Tabor Shares Three Reasons We Should Forgive

1. We are told to forgive. – As is mentioned above, Jesus tells us to forgive others. Peter asked Jesus how many times we were required to forgive – seven? That might seem like a strange number, but, in Peter’s time, the religious leaders said you only had to forgive someone three times. Jesus answered Peter that he was to forgive 77 times. Now, this doesn’t mean we need to keep track. What Jesus was telling Peter – and what Peter no doubt understood – is that there is no limit to the number of times we are to forgive. (Matthew 18)

2. Unforgiveness hurts us. – Unforgiveness can hinder our prayers. Many times we hold onto unforgiveness, and we expect it to hurt the person toward whom we harbor those feelings. It has been said, however, that holding unforgiveness inside you is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die. It hurts you and causes stress and negativity in your life – not the other person’s.

3. We are forgiven. – God forgives us. We are to forgive others. That is what Jesus was saying in Matthew 6. It is out of gratitude for God’s forgiveness that we can forgive.

That said, forgiveness is not always easy. It is a process, but, with God’s help, we can move through it.

We can forgive – like Wanda forgave.

“I’m so happy to meet my dad,” said Wanda. Although they’ve had discussions as to what happened over 40 years ago, Wanda isn’t interested in dwelling on the past. She wants to get to know who her father is now and enjoy the short time they have together. That’s what’s important – providing memories that will last until the end of time.

Did you see the very fitting song Wanda’s dad sang to her, and hear Wanda’s teary account of the beautiful story?

https://youtu.be/x5cLaSxZMDU

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Why Does God Allow Suffering and Sin?

Lessons from the life of Joseph

Written by Dan Lee on 28/06/2016
Series: Weekly Devotional
Tags: Sovereignty, Circumstances
As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today.

Genesis 50:20
Every day, we read or hear about a terrible crime committed against innocent people. Shootings, bombings, attacks, and more. We often wonder, “Why does God allow suffering and sin?” — especially when the victim is someone we know and love.

The Bible story of Joseph in the book of Genesis (starting in Chapter 37) can help to answer this question. Here are three things to understand and remember…

1. Know that God is in Control
Joseph was the favorite son of Jacob (the founder of the nation of Israel). As a young man, he was sold into slavery in far away Egypt by his jealous brothers.

He became a servant to a powerful Egyptian, but then he was falsely accused of a crime and was put in prison.

Eventually, Joseph was given a chance to interpret the dreams of the king – the Pharaoh. This led to his release, and he was given to the highest position in Egypt, next to the Pharaoh himself.

Joseph used his authority to command the Egyptians to store up food to protect against the coming famine. Jacob and his family traveled to Egypt, were reunited with Joseph, and the nation of Israel was saved.

2. Remember that God Uses the Actions of Sinful People for Good
Years later, when Jacob died, the brothers worried that Joseph would now take revenge on them. But then Joseph said these famous words: “As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today.”

Joseph’s brothers had committed an evil, sinful act. And though God hates sin, he used their actions to save the nation of Israel.

3. Understand that God Always has a Purpose
Some 1,700 years later, one of Jacob’s descendants was born in Bethlehem; His name was Jesus. He came to show us what God is like, but also to give His life for us.

So when the greatest evil action of all time happened, it was also part of God’s plan: "…Jesus, delivered up according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of lawless men."

We can rejoice in knowing that this same God can and will use every circumstance – even people’s evil actions – to accomplish His purposes.

Pray this week:

Ask God to give you the faith to believe that He is in control, no matter what you are going through.

Visit the Kairos webiste https://cabinet.kairosplanet.com/register/#111b0e